Tokyo 2020 Olympic Aquatics Centre
Tokyo Metropolitan Government

Tokyo 2020 Olympic swimming venue stays, but volleyball could move

Leave a comment

TOKYO (AP) — Olympic organizers agreed Tuesday to keep the rowing, canoe sprint and swimming venues at their planned sites in Tokyo for the 2020 Games, while postponing a decision until Christmas on a possible switch for volleyball.

Representatives of the International Olympic Committee, Tokyo organizers and Japan’s central and city governments have been discussing ways of reducing costs, including possibly moving three sports from planned new venues to existing ones.

The group was established in October after a Tokyo government panel said the Olympics cost could exceed 3 trillion yen ($27 billion) unless drastic cuts were made.

At Tuesday’s four-party talks, Tokyo organizing committee CEO Toshiro Muto proposed putting a 2 trillion yen ($18 billion) cap on total Olympic costs. A final budget has yet to be released.

IOC vice president John Coates, who heads the international body’s coordination commission for Tokyo, said the ceiling was too high.

“The IOC has not agreed to that amount of money,” Coates told reporters.

“We believe the cost can be significantly lower than that,” he added, citing “high figures” on the rent. “We can make some savings on those figures.”

The Tokyo panel had initially proposed moving the rowing and canoe sprint venue, currently planned at the Sea Forest in Tokyo, to Miyagi prefecture, 400 kilometers (250 miles) north of Tokyo, after its cost estimate soared to nearly 50 billion yen ($450 million). A new feasibility study shows the cost could come down to around 30 billion yen ($270 million).

“Considering the cost, location and various other factors, we have decided to hold (the rowing and canoeing) at the planned Sea Forest site,” Tokyo Gov. Yuriko Koike said.

Koike proposed using the Naganuma boat facility, which she had considered as an option, as a training facility ahead of the Tokyo Games. Koike had pushed for the Naganuma facility, which is in the area still recovering from the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami, as a symbol of reconstruction, which she says gives significance to holding the Olympics in Japan in 2020.

A new swimming facility at its planned location, Tatsumi in eastern Tokyo, will have seating capacity reduced from 20,000 to 15,000, saving 14 billion yen ($125 million).

Koike said she still needs time to decide whether to move indoor volleyball to Yokohama Arena instead of building a new arena in Tokyo’s coastal Ariake district. She said the estimated 40 billion yen ($360 million) cost of the Tokyo venue is “still very high,” promising a decision by Christmas — a delay the group accepted.

Christophe Dubi, the IOC’s executive director of the Olympic Games, said a venue change would require a lot of work and would be “ambitious,” hinting the likelihood of volleyball also staying in Tokyo.

Cost estimates at a number of venues have surged since Tokyo was awarded the games in 2013, in part due to rising construction costs related to disaster reconstruction.

Koike repeatedly cited the IOC’s “Agenda 2020” reforms that seek sustainable Olympics and encourage the use of existing venues, not just in Japan but universally, saying her effort is fully in line with them. Concerns over costs have discouraged some cities from bidding.

MORE: Some 2020 Olympic baseball, softball games set 150 miles from Tokyo

Tyson Gay keeps sprinting in memory of 15-year-old daughter

AP
Leave a comment

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — She ran the 100m and 200m — just like dad. She was so fast and would’ve been a college standout. This he has no doubt.

That’s why Tyson Gay nearly walked away from racing. It was too painful with his daughter gone. So painful that when he trains he feels the stress in his back and can’t shake it off.

Only, she wouldn’t want him to quit. So he keeps sprinting in the memory of his 15-year-old daughter, Trinity , who was shot and killed in October outside a restaurant in Lexington, Kentucky.

“It’s crushing and it never goes away. But you try to live with it,” said Gay , who competes in the first round of the 100m on Thursday night at the USATF Outdoor Championships. “You try to think about the good times.”

Like how she used to visit him in Florida for spring break or Thanksgiving. Or how they had the same teacher in high school and the teacher once playfully told Trinity how much better of a student she was than her father. Or how when he couldn’t spell a word, he would turn and ask her.

Out of habit, he still does that.

“I think about my daughter every day,” Gay said as he sat in a hotel lobby after a training session. “Every day.”

He didn’t hear the phone ring in the early morning hours on Oct. 16. His sister came downstairs and woke him up. Trinity was shot outside a Lexington restaurant after witnesses told police that gunfire was exchanged between two vehicles. She was hit by a stray round. There have been four charged in connection with her death.

“You’re upset you couldn’t be there to stop it,” Tyson Gay said. “It was just a group of honor students, going out to have a good time. And something like that happens? Crazy.

“I cried on the plane the whole way home. I was numb. I probably never cried that hard in my life.”

The tears keep flowing .

“The funeral, the wake, the burial, everything was unreal,” Gay said. “It’s been eight months and it still seems unreal. … I don’t think you ever have peace. I’ve learned to think about the good times, try to block that image of her death out of my mind.”

For the next month, it was hard for him to do much of anything, let alone return to track. After all, running was their thing.

Trinity was a sprinter at Lafayette High in Lexington and finished fourth in the 100m and fifth in the 200m at the state Class 3A high school track meet in May 2016. She also ran on a 4x200m relay team that finished fourth.

She never thought of herself as the daughter of Tyson Gay. She was Trinity Gay.

“I was so proud of her with that,” Gay said. “She was just a happy person. She was happy, loving and wanted to be herself. I never felt like she was in my shadow.”

He returned to training in late November more to “clear my mind and get out of the house,” he said. “You’re looking for closure every day and it doesn’t come. It’s just been tough in that sense.”

At 34, he’s not sure how many years he has left in the sprint game. This season for sure and then he will see how he feels.

Gay is the American record holder in the 100m (9.69 seconds) and he competed in the last three Summer Olympics. He was part of a team that won a silver medal in the 4x100m relay at the 2012 London Games, though that medal was ultimately stripped after Gay tested positive for steroids in 2013.

“I’ve been through every major upset and every major stresser that life can give you,” Gay said. “It’s very hard emotionally. It would’ve been easy for me to quit (track). I’m still fighting.”

She would’ve wanted him to keep running. She had a front row seat at some of his biggest meets.

“Track is something she loved. It’s something I loved,” Gay said. “I had a college coach tell me a year ago, ‘Hey man, we need your daughter to run for us.’ I told her about it and she got tickled. She thought it was so cool. That made me so proud.”

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Double amputee entered in USATF Outdoor Champs

USA Swimming National Championships broadcast schedule

Getty Images
Leave a comment

NBC Sports will air daily coverage of the USA Swimming National Championships broadcast schedule in Indianapolis next week, part of the Team USA Summer Champions Series.

Olympic gold medalists Katie LedeckyRyan MurphySimone Manuel and Lilly King are expected to headline the field at nationals, where the top two per individual event qualify for worlds in Budapest in July.

NBCSN will air live finals coverage on the first two nights Tuesday and Wednesday, with Universal HD airing the last three nights of finals. Finals start at 6 ET each night.

NBC will also air coverage Saturday and Sunday at 1 p.m. ET.

NBCSports.com/live and the NBC Sports app will stream all coverage on NBCSN and NBC, plus the USA Swimming webcast on Universal HD nights.

A USA Swimming webcast will live stream all prelim sessions that begin at 9 a.m. ET daily.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Phelps takes on great white on Shark Week

Date Time (ET) Network
Tuesday 7-8 p.m. (LIVE) NBCSN, Streaming
Wednesday 7-8 p.m. (LIVE) NBCSN, Streaming
Thursday 6-8 p.m. (LIVE) Universal HD
Friday 6-8 p.m. (LIVE) Universal HD
Saturday 1-3 p.m. NBC, Streaming
Saturday 6-8 p.m. (LIVE) Universal HD
Sunday 1-3 p.m. NBC, Streaming