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Tessa Virtue, Scott Moir return to top with Grand Prix Final win

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Canadians Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir stamped their comeback to the top of ice dance, nearly five years since their last major title, by winning their first Grand Prix Final in record fashion Saturday.

The 2010 Olympic champions, back this season after a two-year break from competition, knocked off the two-time reigning world champions from France, training partners Gabriella Papadakis and Guillaume Cizeron, on French ice in Marseille.

“At the start of the season our goal was really to qualify for this event,” said Virtue, who with Moir earned four Grand Prix Final silver medals before this week’s breakthrough. “After competing at Grand Prix Final five times, it feels nice to finally get the win.”

Virtue and Moir tallied 197.22 points, the highest total ice dance score under a judging system implemented in 2005. The French were 4.11 points behind, followed by U.S. champions Maia and Alex Shibutani in third.

Virtue and Moir completed a perfect fall season in a sport, and a discipline, where a climb back to the top after ceding the throne can be arduous.

Virtue and Moir won the 2010 Olympic title in Vancouver, then swapped world titles with then-training partners Meryl Davis and Charlie White in 2011 and 2012 before being supplanted by the Americans on the Olympic stage in Sochi.

Moir kissed the ice after their final performance in Russia, just as he did in Vancouver, but it was not a kiss goodbye to competition. The couple announced their comeback last Feb. 20.

“We probably have one more shot at it [the Olympics], so we have to take advantage of it,” Moir said then, following up his reported May 2015 comments, “We’re not coming back unless it’s to become Olympic champions again.”

Davis and White have not skated since Sochi (yet haven’t retired), but a new power ascended in ice dance the last two seasons.

In 2015, Papadakis and Cizeron became the youngest world champions in 40 years. They repeated last season, impressively, after Papadakis suffered a concussion in a practice fall seven months earlier.

When Virtue and Moir came back, they joined Papadakis and Cizeron’s training base in Montreal.

“I think we have to earn that term to be associated as rivals to Gabriella and Guillaume,” Virtue reportedly said early this season. “We are not quite there yet for sure, but they have taken the ice dance world to an entirely different level in the last few years.”

Virtue and Moir beat Papadakis and Cizeron by nine points at NHK Trophy two weeks ago, with a world-record total, and scored even better in Marseille.

“We just wanted to be in the mix [this season],” Moir said. “The state of ice dance has come up quite a ways. And this is not something that we expected. Now we know that this doesn’t make it easy for us, it makes it a lot harder. … Now we have a huge target on our backs. … Our workload just multiplied by 10.”

Now, Virtue and Moir may be on their way to a rare feat in 2018 — to win an Olympics, see somebody else win an Olympics, and then regain the gold. Across all figure skating disciplines, only Russian pairs Yekaterina Gordeeva and Sergey Grinkov have done this.

After their win in Marseille, Moir was asked about returning to the Grand Prix Final for a seventh time next season.

“There are a couple of other goals we’re looking for other than the longevity award,” he said.

The Grand Prix Final concludes Saturday with the women’s and men’s free skates (schedule here). NBCSN will air coverage Sunday from 8:30-11 p.m. ET.

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Ice Dance Results
GOLD: Tessa Virtue/Scott Moir (CAN) — 197.22
SILVER: Gabriella Papadakis/Guillaume Cizeron (FRA) — 192.81
BRONZE: Maia Shibutani/Alex Shibutani (USA) — 189.60
4. Yekaterina Bobrova/Dmitry Soloviyev (RUS) — 181.95
5. Madison Hubbell/Zachary Donohue (USA) — 179.59
6. Madison Chock/Evan Bates (USA) — 179.32

Eliud Kipchoge wins London Marathon; no world record (video)

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Eliud Kipchoge won his eighth straight marathon (ninth if you count Nike’s sub-two attempt), but missed the world record at a steamy London Marathon by more than one minute on Sunday.

The Kenyan Olympic champion clocked 2:04:27, pulling away from Ethiopian Tola Kitata by 33 seconds. Mo Farah, the four-time Olympic track champ in his second marathon, finished third in 2:06:32.

Kipchoge and Kitata fell off Dennis Kimetto‘s world-record pace around the 20th mile. Kimetto ran 2:02:57 at the 2014 Berlin Marathon.

Full results are here.

The temperature eclipsed 70 degrees Farenheit during the race, making it one of the hottest London Marathons ever.

No world record in the women’s race, either. Kenyan Vivian Cheruiyot won in 2:18:31, passing pre-race favorite Mary Keitany in the 23rd mile. Cheruiyot won by 1 minute, 42 seconds over countrywoman Brigid Kosgei. Keitany slowed to fifth in 2:24:27.

Cheruiyot, a 34-year-old mom, made her marathon debut in London last year, finishing fourth. Before that, Cheruiyot earned four Olympic medals on the track, plus four world titles combined in the 5000m and 10,000m.

Paula Radcliffe‘s world record with male pacers — 2:15:25 from 2003 — was a target for Keitany. Last year, Keitany broke Radcliffe’s world record without male pacers by 41 seconds, winning her third London title in 2:17:01.

The other leading contender Sunday, Ethiopian Tirunesh Dibaba, stopped in the 20th mile.

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MORE: Shalane Flanagan looks to future after last Boston Marathon

2018 London Marathon results

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Top finishers from the 38th London Marathon (full searchable results here) …

Men’s Elite
1. Eliud Kipchoge (KEN) 2:04:27
2. Tola Kitata (ETH) 2:05:00
3. Mo Farah (GBR) 2:06:32
4. Abel Kirui (KEN) 2:07:07
5. Bedan Karoki (KEN) 2:08:34
6. Kenenisa Bekele (ETH) 2:08:53
7. Lawrence Cherono (KEN) 2:09:25
8. Daniel Wanjiru (KEN) 2:10:35
9. Amanuel Mesel (ERI) 2:11:52
10. Yohanes Gebregergish (ER) 2:12:09
17. Guye Adola (ETH) 2:32:35

Women’s Elite
1. Vivian Cheruiyot (KEN) 2:18:31
2. Brigid Kosgei (KEN) 2:20:13
3. Tadelech Bekele (ETH) 2:21:30
4. Gladys Cherono (KEN) 2:24:10
5. Mary Keitany (KEN) 2:24:27
6. Rose Chelimo (BRN) 2:26:03
7. Mare Dibaba (ETH) 2:27:45
8. Lily Partridge (GBR) 2:29:24
9. Tracy Barlow (GBR) 2:32:09
10. Stephanie Bruce (USA) 2:32:28
DNF. Tirunesh Dibaba (ETH)

Men’s Wheelchair
1. David Weir (GBR) 1:31:15
2. Marcel Hug (SUI) 1:31:15
3. Daniel Romanchuk (USA) 1:31:16
4. Josh George (USA) 1:31:24
5. Kurt Fearnley (AUS) 1:31:24

Women’s Wheelchair
1. Madison de Rozario (AUS) 1:42:58
2. Tatyana McFadden (USA) 1:42:58
3. Susannah Scaroni (USA) 1:43:00
4. Manuela Schar (SUI) 1:43:01
5. Amanda McGrory (USA) 1:43:04

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MORE: Shalane Flanagan looks to future after last Boston Marathon