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Gabby Douglas’ mom: Leslie Jones ‘came to the rescue’ in Rio

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Gabby Douglas‘ mom said comedian Leslie Jones triggered the biggest display of kindness she and her daughter felt during a difficult time at the Rio Olympics.

“A lot of what I’ve seen and we’ve encountered [on social media] and experienced has been negativity,” Natalie Hawkins said on a Share Kindness panel with Lady Gaga‘s mom and the Today Show parenting team on Wednesday. “I know it wasn’t the whole world, but it sort of felt like it was. We couldn’t go on her time feed without seeing just the most hateful, the most disgusting things.

“Leslie Jones who kind of came to the rescue with the #LoveforGabby hashtag. … That was glorious, in fact. It went so far in making our family feel so much better. It was so hard to see so many people weighing in with so many hateful things and not one ounce of compassion.”

Hawkins said she made a mistake in telling her daughter to “suck it up” when the criticism was affecting her.

“If this is going on at your job, how well would you be sucking it up,” Douglas told her.

“Knowing me and my personality, I wouldn’t have sucked it up,” Hawkins said. “I would have marched down to HR and demand that something be done, and I would not have rested until it was.

“I actually learned a lesson, that you can’t sweep it under the rug.”

Hawkins said she was more proud of Douglas enduring tough competitions in her comeback than during her triumph at the 2012 Olympics.

“You were more of a champion to me in those moments than when you stood on the podium and got a gold medal in London,” Hawkins said.

Hawkins, a single mom, reflected on raising her four kids — Douglas and her three older siblings, sisters Arielle and Joyelle and brother Johnathan.

Douglas left her family in Virginia at age 14 in October 2010 to train with coach Liang Chow in West Des Moines, Iowa.

One story in particular about the London Olympic all-around champion learning about another mom who was struggling to provide for her children:

“When she found out about it, she immediately got online and got them some things,” Hawkins said. “And I think the thing that touched me the most is that she could have gotten those items for free, because she had a partnership, but she said it didn’t feel like a gift. She wanted to take from her own abundance now and share it with someone else.”

Douglas has not publicly said if or when she will return to gymnastics.

MORE: Laurie Hernandez undecided on competing in 2017

U.S. boblsedders remembering Steve Holcomb

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PYEONGCHANG, South Korea (AP) — The memories are impossible to ignore. Justin Olsen sees him in the start house. Elana Meyers Taylor hears him on her track walks. Mentions of his name bring some members of the team to tears, and others still can’t fully open up about how difficult moving on has been.

NBCOlymipcs.com: 2018 U.S. Olympic bobsled team

It’s been nine months since Steven Holcomb died.

USA Bobsled is not over it, not by any stretch of the imagination.

Holcomb was the best bobsledder in U.S. history, and he was supposed to be at these PyeongChang Olympics for what likely would have been the final races of his career. Instead, the Americans will head to the start house at the Alpensia Sliding Center on Sunday for the first bobsled races of these games and face the nearly impossible task of doing as well as he would have done.

This season has been one struggle after another for the Americans. Nerves have been frayed all year. Results have been far from what the U.S. wanted or envisioned. Getting a third men’s sled to PyeongChang was a challenge until the final possible moment, something that certainly would not have been the case if Holcomb was still driving.

Read the rest of the story and watch live streams by clicking here 

Mikaela Shiffrin opens up on slalom disappointment

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The day after an winning an Olympic gold in the women’s the giant slalom, Shiffrin was widely expected to defend her gold medal in the slalom.

Shiffrin, failed to do so, finishing in fourth position. In what she considered to be her favorite event, the American came up short by just eight one-hundredths of a second of winning the bronze. The American even admitted to vomiting before she took to the course. 

The American took to Twitter earlier this morning giving fans more detail about the race that’s been lingering on her mind, and the nerves that overcame her.

Shiffrin continues to detail in the tweets below that, though not the result she wanted, she was proud of herself for showcasing the passion and love that she has for the sport and for the Olympic Games.

An athlete who is held to the highest of standards, and when one Olympic gold medal might feel like a minute failure from someone who has been expected to dominated these Olympic Games, Shiffrin expressed the gratitude she feels to be a part of the 2018 Olympics and to compete alongside athletes, many of whom will walk away without any medal whatsoever.

Shiffrin continued:

Shiffrin did not participate in the super-G, which was astonishingly won by Czech Republic’s Ester Ledecka. The dual-athlete wore Shiffrin’s skis en route to her own Olympic memory.

The American is expected to be competing next in the women’s downhill, where qualification begins on Feb. 21. Lindsey Vonn is also expected to be competing in the downhill.