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Mikaela Shiffrin wins first World Cup giant slalom outright

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Mikaela Shiffrin finally has a World Cup giant slalom victory all to herself, in her 38th start in the discipline.

Shiffrin, the world’s best slalom skier, notched her first solo GS win in Semmering, Austria, on Tuesday. She prevailed by .78 of a second over two runs, after leading by .27 after the first run.

France’s Tessa Worley was second, followed by Italian Manuela Moelgg.

“I believed in myself for the first time in a GS race, and that was very emotional,” said Shiffrin, who pumped her fists and screamed after crossing the finish line. “I don’t expect to win every GS now. I’m just trying to go with this feeling.”

FULL RESULTS | RUN 2 REPLAY

Before Tuesday, Shiffrin had won 23 World Cup races before the age of 22, 22 of them in slalom and one shared giant slalom victory from two years ago. A solo GS win had eluded her, amid a trio of runners-up, two thirds and a string of eight straight top-10s earlier in her young career.

Shiffrin said she focused on giant slalom in recent training, limiting her slalom training to “every now and then” while she holds a 14-race winning streak in that discipline.

“I keep training GS, eventually I have to get good at it, right?” Shiffrin joked. “Hopefully, it helps my GS and doesn’t hurt my slalom too much.”

Remember at the Sochi Olympics, Shiffrin said she dreamed of winning five gold medals at PyeongChang 2018. She must still make substantial gains in the speed events of downhill and super-G to make that a possibility. Her best World Cup speed-event finish is 13th in five career starts.

However, a goal of becoming World Cup overall champion is becoming more and more possible. Shiffrin moved 55 points clear of Swiss Lara Gut in the standings through 13 of a scheduled 37 races Tuesday.

Shiffrin could become the youngest World Cup overall winner since Janica Kostelic in 2003 and the third U.S. woman to claim the title (Tamara McKinneyLindsey Vonn).

“It’s a dream to win, but I’m not expecting to win this year,” Shiffrin said. “Lara is so strong in every event. … I’m just trying to focus on giant slalom and slalom and see what happens.”

Also Tuesday, Austrian Anna Veith, in her first race since March 22, 2015 due to knee surgery, was 49th out of 60 finishers in the first run and did not qualify for the 30-skier second run.

Veith, the 2014 and 2015 World Cup overall champ, hit a stone early in her run, damaging a ski, according to the Associated Press.

“Unfortunately this was not how I thought it would be,” Veith said, according to the AP. “But I am happy that I was back at the start again even though the skiing was far off from where I want it to be.”

The women’s World Cup continues with a giant slalom and slalom in Semmering on Wednesday and Thursday, both live on NBCSports.com/live. The night slalom’s second run will also air live on NBCSN on Thursday at 11:30 a.m. ET.

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Eliud Kipchoge wins London Marathon; no world record (video)

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Eliud Kipchoge won his eighth straight marathon (ninth if you count Nike’s sub-two attempt), but missed the world record at a steamy London Marathon by more than one minute on Sunday.

The Kenyan Olympic champion clocked 2:04:27, pulling away from Ethiopian Tola Kitata by 33 seconds. Mo Farah, the four-time Olympic track champ in his second marathon, finished third in 2:06:32.

Kipchoge and Kitata fell off Dennis Kimetto‘s world-record pace around the 20th mile. Kimetto ran 2:02:57 at the 2014 Berlin Marathon.

Full results are here.

The temperature eclipsed 70 degrees Farenheit during the race, making it one of the hottest London Marathons ever.

No world record in the women’s race, either. Kenyan Vivian Cheruiyot won in 2:18:31, passing pre-race favorite Mary Keitany in the 23rd mile. Cheruiyot won by 1 minute, 42 seconds over countrywoman Brigid Kosgei. Keitany slowed to fifth in 2:24:27.

Cheruiyot, a 34-year-old mom, made her marathon debut in London last year, finishing fourth. Before that, Cheruiyot earned four Olympic medals on the track, plus four world titles combined in the 5000m and 10,000m.

Paula Radcliffe‘s world record with male pacers — 2:15:25 from 2003 — was a target for Keitany. Last year, Keitany broke Radcliffe’s world record without male pacers by 41 seconds, winning her third London title in 2:17:01.

The other leading contender Sunday, Ethiopian Tirunesh Dibaba, stopped in the 20th mile.

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MORE: Shalane Flanagan looks to future after last Boston Marathon

2018 London Marathon results

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Top finishers from the 38th London Marathon (full searchable results here) …

Men’s Elite
1. Eliud Kipchoge (KEN) 2:04:27
2. Tola Kitata (ETH) 2:05:00
3. Mo Farah (GBR) 2:06:32
4. Abel Kirui (KEN) 2:07:07
5. Bedan Karoki (KEN) 2:08:34
6. Kenenisa Bekele (ETH) 2:08:53
7. Lawrence Cherono (KEN) 2:09:25
8. Daniel Wanjiru (KEN) 2:10:35
9. Amanuel Mesel (ERI) 2:11:52
10. Yohanes Gebregergish (ER) 2:12:09
17. Guye Adola (ETH) 2:32:35

Women’s Elite
1. Vivian Cheruiyot (KEN) 2:18:31
2. Brigid Kosgei (KEN) 2:20:13
3. Tadelech Bekele (ETH) 2:21:30
4. Gladys Cherono (KEN) 2:24:10
5. Mary Keitany (KEN) 2:24:27
6. Rose Chelimo (BRN) 2:26:03
7. Mare Dibaba (ETH) 2:27:45
8. Lily Partridge (GBR) 2:29:24
9. Tracy Barlow (GBR) 2:32:09
10. Stephanie Bruce (USA) 2:32:28
DNF. Tirunesh Dibaba (ETH)

Men’s Wheelchair
1. David Weir (GBR) 1:31:15
2. Marcel Hug (SUI) 1:31:15
3. Daniel Romanchuk (USA) 1:31:16
4. Josh George (USA) 1:31:24
5. Kurt Fearnley (AUS) 1:31:24

Women’s Wheelchair
1. Madison de Rozario (AUS) 1:42:58
2. Tatyana McFadden (USA) 1:42:58
3. Susannah Scaroni (USA) 1:43:00
4. Manuela Schar (SUI) 1:43:01
5. Amanda McGrory (USA) 1:43:04

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MORE: Shalane Flanagan looks to future after last Boston Marathon