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Ashton Eaton wants to be the first person on Mars

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Olympic decathlon champ Ashton Eaton‘s recent life changes included a retirement and an edit to his Twitter bio, which now partially reads, “I’m deciding what to do next. Being the 1st person on Mars would be cool.”

“That is a pretty serious idea and goal of mine,” Eaton said, according to ESPN.com, after he and wife Brianne Theisen-Eaton announced the end of their track and field careers Wednesday. “But I have to think about my family, my future, the family I might have one day with kids. And Brianne is not too thrilled about it. Because especially if you are on the first space ship, there is a good chance you won’t make it. Do I really want to put my family through that?”

Eaton’s Twitter bio also lists interests of education, transportation, infrastructure, architecture and energy.

“I would prefer he does those,” rather than Mars, Theisen-Eaton said Thursday. “I’m not a fan of going to Mars. He’s actually said, Bri, how cool would it be if we both went to Mars and had the first Martian? I was like, no, we’re not doing that. I’m the one who’s going to have a kid on Mars, and I’m not cool with that. So, not happening. I’m hoping that’s more of a joke than anything.”

Eaton’s fascination with the red planet is nothing new. In February, while in a New York hotel room, he found an online contest put on by a British group to design a map symbol for Mars.

“I sent in a hand sketch that, looking back on it, it was obviously really bad,” Eaton said Thursday. “Basically it was a space boot with an emblem.”

Eaton later blogged about his exploration desires for the British group. The winner’s design was a landing-craft symbol.

The Eatons are 28 years old. Time is running out if they want to go to Mars.

“I think it’s kind of like track,” Eaton said. “You’re close to making the Olympic team, but all of a sudden you get an injury. That can be something like a rocket going up and just completely blowing up. That’ll delay stuff a really long time. We’re going to put humans in this thing? The chance increases that people die. … All things going well, I think we’re always close.”

MORE: Eatons’ coach says they’re retiring at the right time

Eliud Kipchoge wins London Marathon; no world record (video)

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Eliud Kipchoge won his eighth straight marathon (ninth if you count Nike’s sub-two attempt), but missed the world record at a steamy London Marathon by more than one minute on Sunday.

The Kenyan Olympic champion clocked 2:04:27, pulling away from Ethiopian Tola Kitata by 33 seconds. Mo Farah, the four-time Olympic track champ in his second marathon, finished third in 2:06:32.

Kipchoge and Kitata fell off Dennis Kimetto‘s world-record pace around the 20th mile. Kimetto ran 2:02:57 at the 2014 Berlin Marathon.

Full results are here.

The temperature eclipsed 70 degrees Farenheit during the race, making it one of the hottest London Marathons ever.

No world record in the women’s race, either. Kenyan Vivian Cheruiyot won in 2:18:31, passing pre-race favorite Mary Keitany in the 23rd mile. Cheruiyot won by 1 minute, 42 seconds over countrywoman Brigid Kosgei. Keitany slowed to fifth in 2:24:27.

Cheruiyot, a 34-year-old mom, made her marathon debut in London last year, finishing fourth. Before that, Cheruiyot earned four Olympic medals on the track, plus four world titles combined in the 5000m and 10,000m.

Paula Radcliffe‘s world record with male pacers — 2:15:25 from 2003 — was a target for Keitany. Last year, Keitany broke Radcliffe’s world record without male pacers by 41 seconds, winning her third London title in 2:17:01.

The other leading contender Sunday, Ethiopian Tirunesh Dibaba, stopped in the 20th mile.

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MORE: Shalane Flanagan looks to future after last Boston Marathon

2018 London Marathon results

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Top finishers from the 38th London Marathon (full searchable results here) …

Men’s Elite
1. Eliud Kipchoge (KEN) 2:04:27
2. Tola Kitata (ETH) 2:05:00
3. Mo Farah (GBR) 2:06:32
4. Abel Kirui (KEN) 2:07:07
5. Bedan Karoki (KEN) 2:08:34
6. Kenenisa Bekele (ETH) 2:08:53
7. Lawrence Cherono (KEN) 2:09:25
8. Daniel Wanjiru (KEN) 2:10:35
9. Amanuel Mesel (ERI) 2:11:52
10. Yohanes Gebregergish (ER) 2:12:09
17. Guye Adola (ETH) 2:32:35

Women’s Elite
1. Vivian Cheruiyot (KEN) 2:18:31
2. Brigid Kosgei (KEN) 2:20:13
3. Tadelech Bekele (ETH) 2:21:30
4. Gladys Cherono (KEN) 2:24:10
5. Mary Keitany (KEN) 2:24:27
6. Rose Chelimo (BRN) 2:26:03
7. Mare Dibaba (ETH) 2:27:45
8. Lily Partridge (GBR) 2:29:24
9. Tracy Barlow (GBR) 2:32:09
10. Stephanie Bruce (USA) 2:32:28
DNF. Tirunesh Dibaba (ETH)

Men’s Wheelchair
1. David Weir (GBR) 1:31:15
2. Marcel Hug (SUI) 1:31:15
3. Daniel Romanchuk (USA) 1:31:16
4. Josh George (USA) 1:31:24
5. Kurt Fearnley (AUS) 1:31:24

Women’s Wheelchair
1. Madison de Rozario (AUS) 1:42:58
2. Tatyana McFadden (USA) 1:42:58
3. Susannah Scaroni (USA) 1:43:00
4. Manuela Schar (SUI) 1:43:01
5. Amanda McGrory (USA) 1:43:04

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MORE: Shalane Flanagan looks to future after last Boston Marathon