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Kenenisa Bekele’s marathon world record quest resumes next week

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Ethiopian Kenenisa Bekele is entered in the Dubai Marathon on Jan. 20 and the London Marathon on April 23, in what appear to be his next two bids to break the 26.2-mile world record.

The London field is deeper, also including Rio Olympic marathon silver medalist Feyisa Lilesa of Ethiopia and 2015 New York City Marathon winner Stanley Biwott of Kenya.

Bekele, 34, padded his argument as the greatest runner of all time when he ran the second-fastest marathon ever, 2:03:03, to win Berlin on Sept. 25. He missed Kenyan Dennis Kimetto‘s record by six seconds.

“It was fantastic for me to get a personal best, but I’m still disappointed to have missed out on the world record,” Bekele said in a media statement Sunday. “I knew I had trained well and I knew what my strengths were. The Berlin race was fantastic, but I could see that I still had to make a couple of changes in my training.”

Bekele racked up world records and Olympic and world titles in the 5000m and 10,000m from 2004 to 2009. He had done little of note since, debuted in the marathon in 2014 and was controversially left off Ethiopia’s Olympic team for Rio.

Bekele’s resurgence came four months ago in Berlin, known as the world’s fastest record-eligible course, and now he goes into 2017 as one of the world’s top two marathoners.

The other is Olympic champion Eliud Kipchoge of Kenya, who is not expected to run a record-eligible spring marathon as he is part of Nike’s sub-two-hour marathon project.

If Bekele breaks the marathon world record, he becomes unquestionably the greatest distance runner of all time (he arguably already is), which would beg the debate over the greatest runner of all time, with his chief rival in that conversation being Usain Bolt.

Bekele’s best shot at the world record this year may come in Dubai next week.

Dubai and London have similar amounts of the fastest marathon times ever, despite Dubai’s disadvantage of not being a World Marathon Major that attracts more of the world’s fastest runners.

World record: 2:02:57 (Kimetto, Berlin 2014)
London Marathon course record: 2:03:05 (Kipchoge, 2016)
Dubai Marathon course record: 2:04:23 (Ayele Abshero, 2012)

If Bekele runs the Berlin Marathon again in September, that would give him the greatest chance of breaking the world record. Berlin appears unlikely if Bekele races at the world track and field championships in August, which he said he will do if he is selected by the Ethiopian federation, according to the IAAF.

Bekele attempted the Dubai-London double in 2015. He dropped out of Dubai around the 19-mile mark due to injury and withdrew before the London Marathon due to an Achilles tendon injury. Bekele wouldn’t run another marathon until London the following year.

The only marathon star whose spring plans haven’t been announced is Kenyan Wilson Kipsang, the only person to break 2:04 three times.

MORE: Boston Marathon field includes 5 of 6 U.S. marathoners from Rio

USOC expects to discuss possible Winter Olympic bid

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PARK CITY, Utah — USOC leaders are expected to discuss a possible Winter Olympic bid as early as next month.

The U.S. could bid for the 2026 or 2030 Winter Olympics. USOC CEO Scott Blackmun said it would be more difficult to bid for 2026 with the 2028 Summer Games set for Los Angeles.

Salt Lake City, Denver, Reno-Tahoe and other cities have expressed interest in bidding, Blackmun said Monday.

The USOC executive board meets Oct. 13. USOC chairman Larry Probst said they “need to talk about” a possible Winter Olympic bid and whether it could be for 2026 or 2030 or later down the line.

The USOC has focused on Summer Olympic bids since 2003. It was officially awarded the 2028 Olympics 12 days ago.

Blackmun added Monday that he hopes multiple U.S. cities could participate in the IOC’s invitational phase for possible bids over the next year. That phase is for cities to receive feedback before formally deciding to put forward a bid.

IOC members are expected to vote in 2019 to determine the 2026 Winter Olympic host.

Sion, Switzerland, is the only city to confirm bid plans.

Probst, an IOC member, also expects Innsbruck, Austria, to bid to become the first city to host the Winter Olympics three times. A public vote for a possible Innsbruck bid to move forward is scheduled for Oct. 15.

Calgary and Stockholm could also bid.

I think [IOC president] Thomas Bach has publicly stated that he would like to see the Winter Games return to a more traditional location,” Probst said. “So, to me, that’s code for Europe or North America. … We’ll have to monitor that, see what the situation looks like and then develop our strategy for whether we’re going to bid for the next Winter Games or longer than that.”

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MORE: Austria looks into multi-country 2026 Winter Olympic bid

USOC supports athletes expressing themselves after anthem protests

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PARK CITY, Utah — The U.S. Olympic Committee supports American athletes expressing themselves at winter sports events leading up to the PyeongChang Olympics.

Some MLB, NFL and WNBA players kneeled and remained in locker rooms during the national anthem at games over the weekend.

USOC CEO Scott Blackmun was asked Monday if the USOC would support American athletes peacefully protesting during the national anthem this fall and winter.

“I think the athletes that you see protesting are protesting because they love their country, not because they don’t,” Blackmun said at a pre-Winter Games media summit. “We fully support the right of our athletes and everybody else to express themselves. The Olympic Games themselves, there is a prohibition on all forms of demonstrations, political or otherwise. And that applies no matter what side of the issue you’re taking, no matter where you’re from. … But we certainly recognize the importance of athletes being able to express themselves.”

Blackmun mentioned Tommie Smith and John Carlos‘ raised-fist salute at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics. The USOC has honored Smith and Carlos. They visited the White House last year with the Rio Olympic team.

“That was a seminal moment not only for the Olympic Movement, but for the U.S. Olympic team,” Blackmun said of the 1968 podium gesture. “Our stance on this has been fairly clear. We certainly recognize the rights of the athletes to express themselves.”

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