Hayley Wickenheiser
Getty Images

Hayley Wickenheiser ends one of the greatest Olympic careers

1 Comment

Hayley Wickenheiser, the greatest women’s hockey player in history, ended her decorated career after five Winter Olympics at age 38.

The four-time Olympic champion retired one year before the PyeongChang Winter Games because of “opportunities I couldn’t put off any longer,” including medical school.

Wickenheiser played in her first world championship since the Olympics last season, and had said she wanted to play through 2018, after undergoing left foot surgeries in consecutive years.

“The longer I sat on it, the more I felt it’s the right time,” Wickenheiser said in a Canadian Press interview. “It’s always hard to leave something you love so much behind … and it’s scary to move forward. … Either I rip the Band-Aid off, or you stall on it. It would have been good to go to one more Olympics.”

For the national team, the forward played in 276 games the last 23 years, recording 168 goals and 211 assists, in addition to the five Olympic medals and seven world titles.

Growing up on a Saskatchewan ranch, Wickenheiser caught the Olympic bug watching the 1988 Calgary Games in person, in particular Finnish ski jumper Matti Nykanen.

She would play in the first five Olympic women’s hockey tournaments, starting at age 19 at Nagano 1998. She and teammate Jayna Hefford share the record for most Olympic hockey medals.

Canada lost to the U.S. in the Nagano final but won all of its 20 Olympic hockey games since, including gold-medal finals in Salt Lake City, Torino, Vancouver and Sochi. Wickenheiser was on all of those teams, plus the 2000 Sydney Olympic softball team for Canada, and earned tournament MVP honors in 2002 and 2006.

Wickenheiser also carried the Canadian flag at the Opening Ceremony in Sochi and recited the Athletes’ Oath at the Opening Ceremony in Vancouver and was elected to the International Olympic Committee Athletes’ Commission in 2014.

In 33 years playing hockey, Wickenheiser became known for not only her talent but also her leadership and grit.

She was at the center of the 2002 Olympic flag stomping controversy, thanks to a furious interview after the Canadians stunned the U.S. in the Salt Lake City Winter Games final. USA Hockey and Hockey Canada denied that a stomping incident took place, but Wickenheiser has said in recent years that she believes there was something to the rumor.

Wickenheiser also became the first woman to score a goal in a men’s professional league on Jan. 31, 2003, in Finland’s second division.

In 1998 and 1999, she attended the Philadelphia Flyers rookie training camp.

“Kind of plays like [two-time U.S. Olympian] John LeClair, only I think she’s a little meaner,” Flyers general manager Bobby Clarke said in 1998, according to the Canadian Press.

The number of registered female hockey players in Canada went from 16,000 in her first year on the national team to almost 87,000 now, according to the Canadian Press.

“I’m also most proud of the fact that a little girl in this country, 5 years old, can walk into any rink with a hockey bag and stick and not have to run into the bathroom and hide in the bathroom stall like I used to have to, or be afraid that someone would find out she’s a girl,” Wickenheiser said. “For me, that’s a long ways, because I had to go through a lot when I was a kid.”

MORE: Amanda Kessel sets sights on 2018 Olympics

Katie Ledecky wins again at nationals; Lilly King sets Russian showdown

Leave a comment

Katie Ledecky, racing while not very rested, still lowered her fastest time in the world this year in the 200m freestyle by a half-second Wednesday night.

And Lilly King set up another showdown with her Russian rival.

Ledecky took her second title in as many days at the USA Swimming Nationals, part of the TeamUSA Summer Champions Series, presented by Comcast.

The quadruple Rio Olympic champion clocked 1:54.84 to win by 1.84 seconds over Leah Smith, repeating their one-two finish from the 800m freestyle Tuesday in Indianapolis.

SWIM NATIONALS: Broadcast Schedule | Event Schedule/Results

The top two swimmers per individual event are in line to make the team for the world championships in Budapest in July, plus extra swimmers in the 100m and 200m frees for relays.

The women’s 200m free was loaded with not only Ledecky and Smith, but also Mallory Comerford, who on Tuesday swam the second-fastest 100m free ever by an American. Plus, Olympic 100m free champion Simone Manuel and Olympian Melanie Margalis.

They made up the top five in the 200m free final, putting them all in the world 4x200m free relay pool.

Ledecky has one race left at nationals, the 400m freestyle on Friday. She is the least tapered she’s ever been at a trials meet, meaning she should be much faster at worlds.

If she finishes top two in the 400m free, she’ll be in line to swim six events at worlds in Budapest, her busiest schedule yet at an Olympics or worlds. In 15 career Olympic/world events, Ledecky brought home 14 golds and one silver.

In other events Thursday, King took 2.2 seconds off her 200m breaststroke personal best to win in 2:21.83 over Bethany Galat.

Only Rebecca Soni and Micah Lawrence have swum faster among Americans all time. Only Russian rival Yuliya Efimova has swum faster this year (though significantly, 2:19.83). King of course won the Rio 100m breast over Efimova but didn’t make the Olympic 200m breast final.

Olympic silver medalist Josh Prenot failed to make the world team in the men’s 200m breast, finishing third behind Rio teammate Kevin Cordes and Nic Fink.

Townley Haas convincingly won the men’s 200m free in a personal-best 1:45:03. Haas had the fastest 4x200m free relay split in Rio but finished fifth in the individual final at his first Olympics.

His time on Thursday is second to only one man over the last three years — Olympic champion Sun Yang.

Rio 4x100m free member Blake Pieroni finished second Thursday (1:46.30) to nab the other world team spot.

Zane Grothe (1:46.39) and Olympic bronze medalist Conor Dwyer (1:47.25) were third and fourth and made the relay. The last time Dwyer did not qualify for the 200m free at a major international meet was the 2012 Olympics.

Olympic champion Ryan Murphy took the 200m backstroke followed by Jacob Pebley in a repeat of the Olympic Trials.

Kathleen Baker won the women’s 200m backstroke by 2.17 seconds in 2:06.38, the fastest time in the world this year. The Olympic 100m back silver medalist dropped 2.98 seconds off her personal best in the 200m back on Wednesday.

Regan Smith, a 15-year-old who finished second, will in Budapest become the youngest American to race individually at a worlds since Elizabeth Beisel in 2007.

VIDEO: Michael Phelps’ Shark Week promo

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

Usain Bolt wins Ostrava 100m, unhappy with time, then long jumps

AP
Leave a comment

Usain Bolt won a 100m in 10.06 seconds, his slowest time in a 100m final this late into a season, and then cited a tight back in Ostrava on Wednesday.

Video of his race is here.

“I just need to go to my doctor and get everything checked out to make sure everything is smooth,” Bolt said, according to British media on site. “It’s just my back, as always. It is a bit tight. But I didn’t get injured, and that’s the key thing. It’s just about sorting it out, and I should be fine.”

Bolt, in his farewell season, has run 10.03 and 10.06 in two 100m races, his slowest final times in June or later of his career. He has one more meet scheduled — Monaco on July 21 — before the world championships in London in August.

Bolt moved into the lead — past a sprinter who has never broken 10 seconds — about 50 meters into Wednesday’s race in the Czech city. He slowed his final few strides once victory was assured, extending a four-year winning streak in individual races.

“I’m not happy with the time, but I’m just getting into my running,” said Bolt, who missed two or three weeks of training this spring following the death of friend and 2008 Olympic high jump silver medalist Germaine Mason. “I have some training to do.”

Bolt has until the world 100m final on Aug. 5 to round into form. He has done it before, but as mentioned never from this kind of time deficit at the start of a summer.

“His preparation is not normally where it used to be at this time, so he is certainly has ground to catch up,” Bolt’s coach, Glen Mills, said this week, according to the Jamaica Gleaner. “A number of factors have interfered with his preparation, but I thought he ran brilliantly at the Racers Grand Prix [the 10.03 on June 10]. His 10.03 in his first race in almost a year with the setbacks in place, if we can build on that over the next six to seven weeks, we should be able to be right where we can feel comfortable taking on the rest of the world.”

The fastest man in the world this year is American Christian Coleman, who ran 9.82 seconds at the NCAA Championships on June 7. Coleman clocked a best of 9.93 in three rounds at the USATF Outdoor Championships last week.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Van Niekerk gets his wish for world champs