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Gus Kenworthy not fazed by condensed schedule for first X Games gold

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Gus Kenworthy may be the world’s best freestyle skier, yet he still lacks X Games gold. Kenworthy will get two chances for a maiden title in Aspen this weekend, but they will come in a tight 15-hour stretch.

An X Games crown “would be everything, everything he’s been shooting for ever since he started this sport,” his agent said Thursday.

Kenworthy, the Olympic ski slopestyle silver medalist, is entered in both ski halfpipe and ski slopestyle at X Games for a fifth straight year. (Kenworthy has also competed in ski big air in the past, but that is not an Olympic event, and he is not doing it this year)

Last year, Kenworthy became the first man to earn Aspen X Games medals in both halfpipe and slopestyle (silvers) since Swede Jon Olsson in 2005. They were his first career medals in Aspen.

The halfpipe was Thursday. The slopestyle was Sunday. Those events have been condensed on this weekend’s schedule.

The ski halfpipe final is at 10:30 p.m. ET on Friday. The ski slopestyle final is at 1 p.m. ET on Saturday.

“It’s actually not that bad, because they’re back to back,” Kenworthy’s agent said Thursday. “Because he went straight into the final for slope [bypassing Thursday qualifying], he gets to focus straight on pipe for tomorrow night. We’ve had all week to train, and the training’s gone pretty well except for some issues with snow.”

Kenworthy also hopes to double at the 2018 PyeongChang Olympics, where he should have days off between events.

“It’s really important to get to the Olympics in both disciplines,” Kenworthy, known in 2014 for adopting puppies in Sochi and in 2015 for coming out as gay, said in the fall. “If I only made it for one, I actually would rather go for pipe because I already got the experience of going for slope.”

In 2014, Kenworthy was part of a U.S. slopestyle sweep in Sochi with gold medalist Joss Christensen and bronze medalist Nick Goepper.

Some may forget that Kenworthy also nearly made the Olympic ski halfpipe team, finishing fourth in qualifying standings. The top three automatically made the Sochi team, while U.S. Ski and Snowboard had a discretionary selection for the last pick.

Kenworthy was passed over for Torin Yater-Wallace, who had won the 2013 World and X Games silver medals but missed all of Olympic qualifying after suffering a collapsed lung and two broken ribs.

Kenworthy called the decision “one of the most heartbreaking things.”

“I was really gutted, it made me feel like the coaches didn’t believe in me, so that really hurt,” said Kenworthy, who at that time had zero world or X Games halfpipe medals. “I felt like I kinda had risked my health for doing the qualifying events for both [slopestyle and halfpipe]. I achieved what I wanted to do — and the person they gave the spot to fell both of his runs [in the Olympics], so it was really upsetting.”

Yater-Wallace said he wasn’t fully recovered in time for Sochi. He and another American, Lyman Currier, finished 26th and 28th out of 28 in the first Olympic ski halfpipe won by American David Wise.

Yater-Wallace praises Kenworthy.

“The most impressive thing about Gus is the way he balances different disciplines,” Yater-Wallace said last week. “There’s few people in this day and age. In the history of freeskiing, everybody used to do it. Now that the levels are so intense in each discipline, and the tricks have such a high level, trying to compete in the halfpipe, big air and slopestyle really is a skill set that only a few can have. And to also maintain a physical and mental level of strength to do that. With such a little amount of people doing all three disciplines, event organizers never set up the practices and events to favor those people. If you’re going into Aspen X Games and you’re Gus Kenworthy, you’ve got to strategically pick which practices you’re going to skip because the other event might overlap that.”

Kenworthy puts the majority of his time into slopestyle because the fields are deeper and the courses more challenging than pipe.

“I train whenever there’s pipe training at an event, I’ll be there that whole time, and maybe in the summer I’ll ski pipe once or twice, learn a new trick to add into my run,” he said. “All my focus goes into slopestyle.”

Which makes Kenworthy’s improvement in halfpipe the last few years all the more impressive. Starting in 2012, his X Games halfpipe results have been 14th, 16th, seventh, fifth and then second last year.

“Gus always had all the tricks, but never went very, very big [in amplitude],” Wise, a three-time Aspen X Games ski halfpipe champion, said last fall. “Then, one year, he just decided that wasn’t OK anymore, and he started going big.”

NBC Olympics researcher Rachel Thompson contributed to this report.

MORE: Mark McMorris, after horrible injury, eyes 2 Olympic golds

Yulia Efimova wags finger as Lilly King rivalry heats up (video)

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The Lilly KingYulia Efimova rivalry is back on, but this time the Russian is wagging her finger.

Efimova missed the 100m breaststroke world record by .01 in the semifinals at the world swimming championships in Budapest on Monday.

Efimova celebrated her time by finger wagging, an homage to King’s famous move in the ready room at the Rio Olympics.  She and King will go head to head in the final as the top two seeds on Tuesday after King won her later semifinal in a personal-best time .17 slower than Efimova.

“I’m always looking at the results from the heat before,” King told media in Budapest, adding that she wasn’t shaved for Monday’s semifinals. “I saw a little finger wag. I saw it. It’s just motivating me more, so that’s OK.”

King, who criticized Efimova’s presence in Rio after serving a doping ban, beat the Russian in the Olympic 100m breaststroke final last year.

Efimova served a 16-month ban for testing positive for the banned steroid DHEA in 2013. She again tested positive in February 2016 for meldonium, though she said she stopped taking it before it became a banned substance Jan. 1 and was absolved along with other athletes.

“You’ve been caught for drug cheating, I’m just not a fan,” King memorably said in Rio, adding last fall, “[Doping] was on all of our minds. We had team meetings talking about what it was going to be like. We were going to be racing dopers, and we all knew it.”

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Katinka Hosszu wins 200m IM as swimmer leaves pool mid-race (video)

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Hungarian Katinka Hosszu delivered the gold-medal performance a raucous Budapest crowd hoped for at the world swimming championships.

Canadian Sydney Pickrem, a medal favorite, appeared to get out of the pool after 50 meters. Swimming Canada later said she “took on water” approaching the first wall.

“Unfortunately it inhibited her to the point where she wasn’t able to continue in the race,” a press release said.

Hosszu won her third straight world title in the 200m individual medley, clocking 2:07.00 at the Danube Arena. The Olympic champion and world-record holder was followed by Japan’s Yui Ohashi (2:07.91) and American Madisyn Cox (2:09.71).

Hosszu was the overwhelming favorite, given she held the three fastest times in the world this year going into Monday’s final. She became the first woman to win 10 individual world championships medals, a mark that Sarah SjostromKatie Ledecky and Yulia Efimova can surpass later in the meet. Retired Australian Leisel Jones won nine, all in breaststroke.

Hosszu scratched her other event Monday night, the 100m backstroke, one of three events she won at the Rio Olympics. Hosszu could earn medals in the 200m backstroke and 400m individual medley later this week.

Pickrem ranked No. 3 in the world this year and had the third-fastest time in the semifinals behind Hosszu and American Melanie Margalis, who finished fourth.

“Just another stepping stone,” said Cox, who finished her University of Texas career this year and made her major international debut in Budapest. “Of course, I want to be better. That time will come.”

Women’s 200m Individual Medley Results
Gold: Katinka Hosszu (HUN) — 2:07.00
Silver: Yui Ohashi (JPN) — 2:07.91
Bronze: Madisyn Cox (USA) — 2:09.71
4. Melanie Margalis (USA) — 2:09.82
5. Runa Imai (JPN) — 2:09.99
6. Kim Seoyeong (KOR) — 2:10.40
7. Siobhan-Marie O’Connor (GBR) — 2:10.41
DQ. Sydney Pickrem (CAN)

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