Déjà vu for Lindsey Vonn in Olympic test event super-G

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Lindsey Vonn came to the 2018 Olympic venue and just missed victories on two straight days, by .07 on Saturday and then .04 in a super-G on Sunday.

Italian Sofia Goggia bumped Vonn to second both days, picking up the first two World Cup wins of her career in Jeongseon, South Korea.

Vonn’s performances this week certainly bode well for what should be her fourth and final Olympics next year. She came to South Korea on Tuesday still recovering from a race crash the previous Saturday, plus food poisoning last week.

Vonn overcame it to post the fastest downhill training runs Thursday and Friday before her back-to-back podium finishes in the official races.

She also made a hefty improvement in super-G. Before Sunday, Vonn’s best super-G finish was ninth in four races since returning from crash-caused knee and arm fractures in January.

“I’m really happy with my performance [Sunday], you know I struggled this season in super-G, so this is my best result by a lot,” Vonn said on NBCSN. “But still definitely frustrated by getting second place. … But, you know, I’ve learned to be patient in ski racing. I’ve lost many races by a few hundredths. I hope that the time will come back around next year for the Olympics.”

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After two training runs, Vonn said her confidence level on the South Korean track was similar to how she feels at her favorite venue of Lake Louise, Alberta.

Vonn has won 18 times in 41 World Cup starts at Lake Louise, a record number for any racer (male or female) at one place in history.

“The main point of this weekend is that I’m really confident on this hill,” said Vonn, who was also second in the Olympic test event downhill for the 2010 Winter Games in Whistler, B.C. “It suits my skiing really well. I know what I can do to be faster.”

Vonn remains on 77 career World Cup wins, nine shy of the record held by retired Swede Ingemar Stenmark. If Vonn stays healthy (no sure thing) and wins at her usual rate, she could break the record next season. Vonn owns one victory in 12 races across all disciplines since returning to racing in January from her latest injuries.

World Cup overall leader Mikaela Shiffrin skipped the South Korean speed races to prepare for next week’s giant slalom and slalom in Squaw Valley, Calif.

Shiffrin leads by 178 points over Slovenian Ilka Stuhec with six races left this season. Only a complete collapse would prevent Shiffrin from becoming the third U.S. woman to take the World Cup overall title (Tamara McKinney, Vonn).

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MORE: Vonn among Olympic medalists in documentary about gender in sports

Sarah Hammer, four-time Olympic cycling medalist, retires

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COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (AP) — Three-time Olympian Sarah Hammer, one of the most decorated track cyclists in U.S. history, is retiring after a prolific career spanning more than two decades.

The 34-year-old Hammer announced Monday that she’s stepping away from competitive riding to focus on the training facility that she founded in Colorado Springs with her coach and husband, Andy Sparks.

Hammer began riding at age 8 and won her first junior title in 1995. She briefly walked away from the sport in 2003, citing burnout, but returned to make the U.S. team for the 2008 Beijing Games.

Focusing on endurance events, Hammer won four Olympic medals and eight world titles and set two world records. Her team pursuit of a silver medal at the 2012 London Games — won with teammates Jennie Reed, Dotsie Bausch and Lauren Tamayo — was chronicled in the documentary “Personal Gold: An Underdog Story.”

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MORE: World Road Cycling Championships broadcast schedule

How to watch Berlin Marathon world-record attempt

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The 26.2-mile world record could fall at the Berlin Marathon on Sunday, live on NBCSN and NBC Sports Gold.

The NBC Sports Gold stream starts at 2:30 a.m. ET, with NBCSN coverage beginning at 3 a.m.

The time to beat is 2:02:57, the world record set by Kenyan Dennis Kimetto in 2014, also in Berlin.

Olympic champion Eliud Kipchoge is the headliner of three candidates to lower that mark.

He won Berlin in 2015 in 2:04:00 with his insoles infamously slipping out the back of his shoes and flopping the last half of the race.

Kipchoge then prevailed at the 2016 London Marathon in 2:03:05, eight seconds shy of Kimetto’s world record, and the Rio Olympics in 2:08:44 in conditions not suitable for a fast time. He won the Olympic marathon by 70 seconds, the largest margin of victory since Frank Shorter won in 1972.

Then on May 6, Kipchoge ran 2:00:25 on an Italian Formula One race track in a bid to become the first person to run 26.2 miles in under 2 hours. It was contested under special conditions that made it ineligible for record purposes with pacers entering mid-race.

Berlin is the world’s fastest record-eligible marathon.

With its pancake-flat roads, the German capital was the site of the last six times the men’s 26.2-mile world record was lowered in the last 14 years, coming down from 2:05:38 to the current mark of 2:02:57.

Kipchoge will also benefit from a strong field.

He will likely be pushed to a fast time, if not beaten, by Ethiopian Kenenisa Bekele, who won the 2016 Berlin Marathon in 2:03:03, the second-fastest time ever.

And by Kenyan Wilson Kipsang, who ran three of the eight fastest marathons ever.

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MORE: Top Americans set for major marathon later this month