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Gary Bettman: No Olympic meetings scheduled for NHL

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NHL commissioner Gary Bettman said Wednesday that there are no meetings scheduled between the NHL and the International Olympic Committee or the International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF) regarding PyeongChang Olympic participation, according to the Canadian Press.

The league hasn’t announced whether it will send players to a sixth straight Olympics in PyeongChang in 11 months.

“Unless something changes we’re not going,” deputy commissioner Bill Daly repeated Wednesday, according to the report. “We’ve said that consistently for three months, so there’s nothing new about that.”

What is new is that there now doesn’t appear to be a resolution before IOC coordination commission meetings in PyeongChang next week.

“I have a coordination commission in March in Korea,” IIHF president Rene Fasel said last month, according to The Associated Press. “We need to know about the accommodation. We need to know about the transportation. The sooner we know, the better we can prepare the conditions for the NHL players and the NHL.”

Fasel said then that the majority of representatives from the 12 qualified nations for the 2018 Olympic men’s hockey tournament “felt that the NHL will likely need to decide during the month of March because of their scheduling needs for next season.”

“However, we do not feel at this time that it would be constructive to set a hard deadline for the NHL and [NHL Players Association] to confirm their participation,” Fasel said.

Daly said in December that the NHL was preparing to devise two separate schedules for the 2017-18 season, one with an Olympic break.

On Wednesday, Bettman said the NHL was focused at the moment on a 2017-18 schedule that didn’t include the Olympics, but a revamped bye-week period, according to the Canadian Press.

The NHL made its 2013-14 schedule and 2014 Olympic participation announcements jointly on July 19, 2013, seven months before the Sochi Winter Games.

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Sarah Hammer, four-time Olympic cycling medalist, retires

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COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (AP) — Three-time Olympian Sarah Hammer, one of the most decorated track cyclists in U.S. history, is retiring after a prolific career spanning more than two decades.

The 34-year-old Hammer announced Monday that she’s stepping away from competitive riding to focus on the training facility that she founded in Colorado Springs with her coach and husband, Andy Sparks.

Hammer began riding at age 8 and won her first junior title in 1995. She briefly walked away from the sport in 2003, citing burnout, but returned to make the U.S. team for the 2008 Beijing Games.

Focusing on endurance events, Hammer won four Olympic medals and eight world titles and set two world records. Her team pursuit of a silver medal at the 2012 London Games — won with teammates Jennie Reed, Dotsie Bausch and Lauren Tamayo — was chronicled in the documentary “Personal Gold: An Underdog Story.”

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How to watch Berlin Marathon world-record attempt

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The 26.2-mile world record could fall at the Berlin Marathon on Sunday, live on NBCSN and NBC Sports Gold.

The NBC Sports Gold stream starts at 2:30 a.m. ET, with NBCSN coverage beginning at 3 a.m.

The time to beat is 2:02:57, the world record set by Kenyan Dennis Kimetto in 2014, also in Berlin.

Olympic champion Eliud Kipchoge is the headliner of three candidates to lower that mark.

He won Berlin in 2015 in 2:04:00 with his insoles infamously slipping out the back of his shoes and flopping the last half of the race.

Kipchoge then prevailed at the 2016 London Marathon in 2:03:05, eight seconds shy of Kimetto’s world record, and the Rio Olympics in 2:08:44 in conditions not suitable for a fast time. He won the Olympic marathon by 70 seconds, the largest margin of victory since Frank Shorter won in 1972.

Then on May 6, Kipchoge ran 2:00:25 on an Italian Formula One race track in a bid to become the first person to run 26.2 miles in under 2 hours. It was contested under special conditions that made it ineligible for record purposes with pacers entering mid-race.

Berlin is the world’s fastest record-eligible marathon.

With its pancake-flat roads, the German capital was the site of the last six times the men’s 26.2-mile world record was lowered in the last 14 years, coming down from 2:05:38 to the current mark of 2:02:57.

Kipchoge will also benefit from a strong field.

He will likely be pushed to a fast time, if not beaten, by Ethiopian Kenenisa Bekele, who won the 2016 Berlin Marathon in 2:03:03, the second-fastest time ever.

And by Kenyan Wilson Kipsang, who ran three of the eight fastest marathons ever.

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