Nathan Chen, quad king, ups ante at world championships; men’s preview

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Nathan Chen landed a record seven quadruple jumps at each of his two most recent competitions. He may try for eight this week in a bid to become the youngest men’s world champion of all time.

The 17-year-old wunderkind, who spent two months last year in a leg brace, is the star attraction of the world figure skating championships in Helsinki.

Chen is certainly a favorite to earn the first U.S. men’s worlds medal since 2009.

He’s arguably the man to beat for gold, coming in with the highest total score in the world this season.

That mark was set at his most recent competition last month, the Four Continents Championships, where Chen beat Olympic champion Yuzuru Hanyu at the 2018 Olympic venue in South Korea.

Chen faced repeated questions about gold medals in a media call last week and refused to bite on outside expectations.

“This is my first worlds,” he stressed, twice. “It’s already in itself a big stepping stone for me to be at my first world championships and competing against everyone together in one event. This is the same people, basically, who will be competing at the Olympics. But a lot can change, as you’ve seen with me, in the course of year.”

Chen, the 10-year-old darling of the 2010 U.S. Championships, would have made his senior worlds debut last season. But he aggravated a hip injury at the U.S. Championships exhibition gala in January 2016. He needed surgery. It took two months before he could walk without a brace.

Now, after rehab and a steady rise of a season, Chen downplays talk of possibly toppling Hanyu and two-time reigning world champion Javier Fernandez of Spain.

“From a technical aspect, of course, I think I’m at that level to be able to make the podium, at least,” Chen said. “But it just really depends on what [other skaters] do and how clean I’m able to perform.”

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It was believed that if Chen landed his record seven quadruple jumps between two clean programs — like he did at nationals in January and Four Continents in February — and Hanyu has two clean programs, then Hanyu wins.

But on Monday, Chen showed in practice that he may attempt an additional quad in his free skate.

On the same day, major Japanese newspaper Mainichi Shimbun ran a story hyping a Chen-Hanyu clash at worlds with an infographic comparing the two skaters’ scores from Four Continents.

“I’m not going into the competition scared that I’ll be outdone [by Chen],” Hanyu said, according to the newspaper’s translation (though it is unclear if they are recent comments or from last month). “Rather, I want to go for perfection.”

Hanyu, who broke scoring world records last season, has not been perfect this season.

He had major jumping errors at December’s Grand Prix Final (where a clean Chen outscored him in the free skate) and in both programs at Four Continents (where Chen topped him in the short program).

If Chen does eight quads, that’s two more than Hanyu’s typical total this season, and three more than Fernandez, but skating is not all about jumps. The veterans can still outpoint Chen in other areas.

Chen proved last month he can handle the pressure. He competed on the 2018 Olympic rink right after Hanyu posted the highest free-skate score in the world this season. Chen, cushioned by a short-program lead, did enough in his five-quad program to hold off Hanyu’s charge.

Chen landed his first quadruple jump at age 15 and by last season was up to four quads in a free skate. Now, he could try six quads in his free in Helsinki.

“Even when I was younger, I never really saw an end to where we could take jumps,” said Chen, the youngest of five children to parents who emigrated from Beijing. “But I never really thought that I would be doing the stuff that I’m doing.”

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Ten swimmers to watch at USA Swimming National Championships

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The U.S. team for the world swimming championships will be determined this week, and it’s going to include some new faces.

Absent are the retired Michael Phelps and Maya DiRado, suspended Ryan Lochte and recovering Missy Franklin.

Katie Ledecky is the headliner, but there are of course many others who will emerge this week as medal favorites for Budapest next month.

The top two per individual event at the USA Swimming National Championships, part of the TeamUSA Summer Champions Series, presented by Comcast, are in line to make the world team. Plus extra swimmers in the 100m and 200m frees for relays.

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Here are 10 swimmers to watch in Indianapolis from Tuesday through Saturday:

Mallory Comerford
No Olympic experience

The rising Louisville junior tied Katie Ledecky for the NCAA 200-yard freestyle title on March 17. Remember, Ledecky is undefeated in 15 individual finals at the Olympics, World Championships and Pan Pacific Championships. It was all the more surprising given Comerford, who is five months younger than Ledecky, was 12th and 13th in the 100m and 200m frees at the Olympic Trials. She enters nationals ranked Nos. 2 and 5 in the 100m and 200m freestyles, respectively.

Madisyn Cox
No Olympic experience

Cox is the best all-around female swimmer in the U.S. aside from Ledecky. She ranks second this year in both individual medleys and the 200m breaststroke. The former University of Texas standout is the direct beneficiary of Ledecky opting not to swim the 400m IM on Thursday, given Ledecky is fastest in the U.S. this year in that event. Cox was fourth in both IMs at the Olympic Trials.

Lilly King
Olympic 100m breast champion

Best known for finger-wagging Yuliya Efimova and then beating the Russian in Rio. King actually ranks No. 2 — in the U.S. — this year in the 100m breast behind Rio bronze medalist Katie Meili. Meili has also been 2.72 faster than King this year in the 200m breast, an event King is trying to improve after being eliminated in the Olympic semifinals.

Katie Ledecky
Five-time Olympic champion

It would be shocking if Ledecky does not win the 200m, 400m, 800m and (if she races it) 1500m frees this week. The intrigue comes in the 100m free, which Ledecky did not contest at this meet four years ago. She lowered her 100m free personal best from 56.00 to 53.75 in the last four years and enters Tuesday’s event ranked No. 5 in the U.S. this year (same as her ranking last year). No doubt Ledecky has the talent to make the 4x100m free relay at worlds (as she did at the Olympics), but could she make the 100m free team outright by finishing top two?

Simone Manuel
Four-time Rio Olympic medalist

Manuel is comfortably the fastest U.S. woman this year in the 50m and 100m frees, where she earned silver and gold in Rio. She’s also ranked No. 4 in the 200m free, and only .18 behind No. 2, after handing Ledecky two defeats in the NCAA 200-yard free this past season.

Michael Andrew
No Olympic experience

Andrew, who turned professional at age 14 in 2013, is entered in nine events this week. No way he swims them all, but could this be the year Andrew fulfills promise and makes his first major international meet? He ranks fourth in the 50m free and third in the 200m individual medley nationally this year but has been best known in recent years for his breaststroke. His best Olympic Trials finish was fourth in the 100m breast.

Caeleb Dressel
Olympic 4x100m free relay champion

Dressel memorably delievered under pressure in Rio, setting a personal best in his first Olympic swim leading off the 4x100m free relay final. Dressel went even faster in his three 100m free swims, placing sixth overall. At age 20, Dressel already holds NCAA records in the 50- and 100-yard frees, plus the 100-yard butterfly. Is he ready to overtake Nathan Adrian as the top U.S. sprinter?

Anthony Ervin
Two-time Olympic 50m free champion

At 36, Ervin is the oldest swimmer at nationals by three years. He defied age most recently in Rio, becoming the oldest individual Olympic swimming champion in winning the 50m freestyle a whopping 16 years after sharing gold in the event in Sydney. Ervin hasn’t shown that kind of form this year. He ranks No. 16 in the U.S. in the 50m free.

Chase Kalisz
Olympic 400m IM silver medalist

No U.S. male swimmer has been more impressive this season than Kalisz. In a three-day span in May, he set personal bests in the 200m IM and the 200m breaststroke, swam the second-best 200m butterfly of his life and posted the then-fastest time in the world this year in the 400m IM. Kalisz is entered in three events this week and owns the fastest time in the U.S. this year in all of them — 200m and 400m IM and 200m butterfly.

Ryan Murphy
Three-time Rio Olympic champion

Murphy may have swept the backstrokes in Rio, but he is ranked second in the country this year in the 100m and 200m distances. Beijing Olympic champion Matt Grevers has been faster in the 100m back. Rio Olympic teammate Jacob Pebley tops the 200m back. Still, it would be a shock to not see Murphy swimming both in Budapest, plus perhaps the 50m.

MORE: King to be less vocal on Efimova topic this summer

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Tori Bowie does not want to double at world champs

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Add Tori Bowie to the list of sprinters not looking to double at the world championships in August.

Bowie won the 100m and finished third in the 200m at the USATF Outdoor Championships, part of the TeamUSA Summer Champions Series, presented by Comcast.

That put her on the U.S. team for worlds in London in both sprints.

But Bowie, who earned Rio 100m silver and 200m bronze, was exhausted after four days of racing in Sacramento heat that eclipsed 110 degrees.

“I for sure don’t want to do the double [at worlds],” Bowie said Sunday. “I just wanted to give myself an option [to race the 100m or the 200m].”

Bowie said she and her coaches will probably decide her racing schedule for worlds in the next two to three weeks.

“More than anything I wanted to try to get this 100m right and try to achieve a gold medal somewhere,” Bowie said, according to TeamUSA.org. “I don’t have a gold medal yet individually, so that’s my main concern right now.”

If Bowie drops the 100m, Olympian Morolake Akinosun is in line to take her spot. If she drops the 200m, it’s Ariana Washington.

“I already experienced that, I did the double in Rio,” Bowie said. “I collected my two medals that I wanted to collect in both events. Right now, I’m satisfied.”

Deajah Stevens and Christian Coleman also made the U.S. team in both the 100m and 200m and are expected to compete in both events.

Meanwhile, both Olympic 200m champions — Usain Bolt and Elaine Thompson — are expected to sit out the 200m in London to focus on the 100m.

World 200m silver medalist Justin Gatlin, 2012 Olympic 200m champion Allyson Felix and LaShawn Merritt all pulled out of the 200m at USATF Outdoors, ruling out world championships doubles.

Gatlin doubled in 2015. Felix doubled in 2011 (200m and 400m) and tried to for Rio but finished fourth in the 200m at the Olympic Trials. Merritt raced the 200m and 400m in Rio.

Both Olympic 400m champions — Wayde van Niekerk of South Africa and Shaunae Miller-Uibo of the Bahamas — plan to also race the 200m at worlds.

MORE: Centrowitz recovers from ‘rock bottom’ to make world team

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