Galen Rupp runner-up as U.S. shines at Boston Marathon

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Kenyan runners swept the Boston Marathon titles, but the U.S. had its best combined male and female finishes since 1985 on Monday.

Rio Olympic bronze medalist Galen Rupp finished second in his first city marathon, 21 seconds behind Kenyan Geoffrey Kirui. Kirui prevailed in 2 hours, 9 minutes, 37 seconds, on a warm day with temperatures in the 70s.

Jordan Hasay, who like Rupp trains under 1982 Boston winner Alberto Salazar, was third in her marathon debut. Hasay crossed 69 seconds behind champion Edna Kiplagat, who clocked 2:21:52.

The Boston Marathon started awarding prize money in 1986, a greater incentive for the world’s top runners to take part. This is the second year since that the U.S put male and female runners in the top three (Kara Goucher and Ryan Hall were both third in 2009).

Meb Keflezighi, the 2014 Boston winner, finished 13th in the men’s race, more than seven minutes behind Kirui. The 41-year-old Keflezighi ran Boston for the final time as an elite racer.

Full Boston Marathon results are here.

Rupp, 30, ran his first marathon last year after a decorated track career that included a 2012 Olympic 10,000m silver medal. He won the February 2016 Olympic Trials marathon before earning bronze in Rio.

Rupp entered Boston as one of the favorites given the field lacked the world’s best handful of marathoners.

Rupp and Kirui were alone when Kirui made his move with about three miles left. Kirui, 24, was not one of the pre-race favorites, largely because he had never contested a major marathon (nor won either of his previous marathons).

“Just didn’t have an answer for him,” Rupp said on NBCSN. “I was really happy with the way I ran. You know, I wasn’t sure two weeks ago if I was even going to be able to come here and start and run.”

Rupp withdrew before January’s Houston Half Marathon with plantar fasciitis in his left foot. Two weeks ago, he spoke of left foot discomfort after finishing 11th in a half marathon in Prague. But a cortisone shot worked wonders.

He ran Monday wearing a white cap given to him by two-time Boston winner Joan Benoit in the hotel lobby that morning. Rupp has a long way to go to reach the status of Benoit, the first Olympic women’s marathon champion, but he seems intent on chasing it.

“I have a lot of room to grow,” said Rupp, who plans to race his final season on the track this summer before moving full-time to the marathon.

The U.S. put six men in the top 10. Keflezighi was not one of them.

The Eritrean-born 2004 Olympic silver medalist has just one marathon left, the 26th of his career in New York City on Nov. 5. Keflezighi struggled Monday, finishing outside the top eight in Boston for the first time.

“I went for it early on, but it was pretty warm and really tough conditions, and training wasn’t the greatest training I ever had,” said Keflezighi, who noted Achilles problems before the race and quad issues after. “It’s not like a victory that I could have ended up with, but at the same time, I enjoyed every bit of it.”

Keflezighi said he broke down in tears about two minutes after finishing, flooded with the emotions brought on by support from the crowd along the course. He noted one sign telling him he was a hero.

“Everybody was saying you’re our hero, we love you, and all that,” said Keflezighi, the only U.S. male or female runner to win Boston since 1985. “Even if you finish 15th or 20th, they still love you.”

In a poignant finish-area moment, Keflezighi embraced the family of Martin Richard on Boylston Street, feet away from where Richard, then 8 years old, was killed in the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings.

In the women’s race, the 37-year-old Kiplagat became the second-oldest winner in Boston history. Her time was the fastest-ever by a woman that old, according to the IAAF’s Jon Mulkeen.

Kiplagat has five children — two biological, two adopted from her sister who died from breast cancer and one adopted from a neighbor who died in childbirth, according to the Chicago Marathon. She has won two world titles and the London and New York City Marathons, but this was her first marathon win since 2014.

Hasay and two-time U.S. Olympian Desi Linden were part of a group of six leaders that began disintegrating after Kiplagat surged around the 19-mile mark.

Hasay’s ability to hang on for third proved to her that moving from the track to the roads at such a young age — 25 — was the right call.

“It was kind of a risky decision,” said Hasay, who ran the fastest debut marathon by a U.S. woman by three minutes. “We weren’t sure how it was going to play out, but it seems like this is definitely my distance. … I can’t wait to do another one.”

Hasay said she ran the entire 26.2 miles with the voice of her mom in her head. Teresa Hasay died unexpectedly at age 56 in November for a reason the family is keeping private.

Teresa used to call Jordan “Paula,” after Jordan’s idol, British marathoner Paula Radcliffe.

On Monday, Jordan repeated to herself, “Good job, Paula, good job, Paula,” along the course.

She always told me that I could be a great marathoner,” Jordan said of her mom.

Of all the Americans, many predicted Linden had the best shot at winning. She was disappointed in placing fourth. Linden remains the fastest U.S. female marathoner never to win a 26.2-mile race.

“I feel like I’ve poured everything into this to figure out how I can get better,” Linden said. “Maybe this is my peak, you know.”

Earlier, 17-time Paralympic medalist Tatyana McFadden finished fourth in the wheelchair division, weeks after surgeries for blood clots. McFadden had previously won each of the world’s four major city marathons each of the last four years.

Swiss Manuela Schar won Boston in 1 hour, 28 minutes, 17 seconds, a course record by nearly six minutes.

McFadden, born in Russia paralyzed from the waist down and adopted from a St. Petersburg orphanage at age 6 by an American, is the only marathoner, able-bodied or wheelchair, to sweep Boston, Chicago, London and New York City in one year, let alone four.

McFadden shockingly lost the Rio Paralympic marathon in a photo finish (video here).

In the men’s wheelchair race Monday, Swiss Marcel Hug won his third straight Boston title. Hug, the Rio Paralympic marathon champion, clocked 1:18:04, the fastest wheelchair marathon time ever.

The time does not count for record purposes as Boston is not a record-eligible course due to its point-to-point, net downhill layout.

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Alysia Montano announces pregnancy with clever video, no racing plans

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U.S. Olympic 800m runner Alysia Montaño is due in November with her second child, but this time she has no current plan to race at the U.S. Championships while pregnant.

Montaño’s husband and manager, Louis, said Wednesday that she has no races on her calendar (nationals are in late June) but hopes to continue her fitness during pregnancy. She may do a couple of 5Ks this summer.

Earlier Wednesday, the family announced the pregnancy in a clever video.

The video included the couple’s first child, Linnea, was born in August 2014, two months after Montaño made worldwide headlines for racing while eight months pregnant at nationals.

Montaño, 31, last raced at the Millrose Games on Feb. 11 in her first meet since falling in the Olympic Trials 800m final on July 4.

Montaño is set to be awarded her first two world outdoor championships medals, four and six years after she ran those races, due to a former Russian rival’s doping ban.

MORE: Montaño finds little joy after Russian stripped of medals

Sweden drops 2026 Winter Olympic bid

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The city of Stockholm says it won’t bid for the 2026 Winter Olympics.

Karin Wanngard, the city official in charge of finances, says the reason is because the International Olympic Committee will not be able to report how big the financial contribution to the host city will be.

She says the figures “will arrive at the earliest in November.”

This means that time will be too short to get enough analysis for the issues raised by several actors,” said the Swedish lawmaker, whose Social Democratic Party had been supportive of hosting the event.

“We Social Democrats have always thought that the Olympic Games are important for Stockholm’s growth and development,” Wanngard said in a statement, adding there was little backing for the event. “Unfortunately, we are alone to have this position about the Olympic Games.”

Swedish Sports Confederation chairman Bjorn Eriksson said he and his organization “fully respect the decision as we also believe in a realistic budget and a sustainable economy.”

Sports Minister Gabriel Wikstrom also supported the decision, adding that the Social Democratic-led government was “ready to handle requests for financial guarantees.”

“We have also been clear that it is Stockholm’s city that must make its decision first,” he told Sweden news agency TT.

The news comes six days after the Swedish Olympic Committee named a CEO for the 2026 bid.

In January, the committee said that Stockholm staging the 2026 Winter Olympics was “possible and desirable” and that a formal bid was expected in March 2018.

In 2015, Stockholm pulled out of the race for the 2022 Winter Games after Swedish politicians refused to give financial backing. Swedish politicians were uncomfortable because of concerns over costs, the environment, post-Games use of venues, the environment and other issues.

The early 2026 bid plan called for 80 percent of the events in Stockholm, while most of the Alpine competitions would be in the northern resort of Are, more than 600 kilometers (400 miles) from the capital. A few skiing events would be in Falun, 215 kilometers (130 miles) northwest from there.

The 2026 Winter Olympics have one bidder — Sion, Switzerland.

Cities in Austria, Canada, Japan and have also discussed potential 2026 bids, as has Lillehammer, Norway, the 1994 Winter Olympic host. The U.S. is not expected to bid for the 2026 Winter Games.

The next two Winter Olympics will be in East Asia in PyeongChang in 2018 and Beijing in 2022, giving a European or North American city a greater opening to be the 2026 host.

The 2026 Olympic host city is expected to be chosen from an International Olympic Committee members vote in 2019.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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