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Carmelita Jeter’s busy summer will not include racing at U.S. Championships

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Carmelita Jeter hasn’t raced in nearly one year. The second-fastest woman in history jokes that you will probably see her at the U.S. Championships in Sacramento later this month.

“But you will not see me competing,” said Jeter, a 37-year-old who lives in the Los Angeles area.

Jeter, the 2011 World 100m champion and triple 2012 Olympic medalist, was slowed significantly by torn quads from 2013 through 2016. That forced her to withdraw ahead of the 2016 U.S. Olympic Trials.

Jeter said the injuries are behind her now, but she decided that 2017 would be a year to let her body rest.

“Am I training? Yes, I am training, but I’m training to just stay in shape now,” Jeter said.

No U.S. Championships means no world championships for Jeter. Asked if she might compete again elsewhere later this year, or next year, and Jeter offered this with a laugh:

I have not retired. I’m still getting drug tested constantly.”

Olympic sports athletes generally make retirements official by filing paperwork to take their names out of a U.S. Anti-Doping Agency drug-testing pool.

Jeter is adamant that she could come back to compete. The evidence is on her Instagram. Video of Jeter starting out of the blocks for the first time since her last quad tear 11 months ago.

But she has other priorities now. Jeter spent this past school year coaching at her alma mater, Division II Cal State Dominguez Hills.

“I can see the eyes of girls that haven’t gotten to where I’ve been,” she said. “It gave me the love of the sport again.”

Jeter is working with her professional agency, Total Sports, to hand-pick athletes to mentor and manage.

And she’s now writing a to-be-titled book due out by August that will be largely about her career. It has been a unique one.

After failing to make the 2008 Olympic team, Jeter put together a stunning four-year cycle that concluded with a medal of every color at London 2012.

In 2009, she broke 11 seconds in the 100m on 16 occasions in six months (some wind-aided, via Tilastopaja.org). Jeter had broken 11 seconds once in her life prior to 2009.

She dropped her personal best from 10.97 to 10.64 that year and became the second-fastest woman all time in the 100m, behind Florence Griffith-Joyner. Her incredible improvement at age 29 (advanced for sprinting) led to scrutiny and skepticism, but Jeter had a clean drug-test record.

“A lot of [the book] is going to be about how I felt when I ran 10.6 and how I didn’t get the notoriety I felt I should have received,” Jeter said. “There were so many question marks on my 10.6 when people weren’t asking all the right questions. They were asking me all the wrong questions. They weren’t asking me, what did I change? How did my life change? How did my mindset change? Those questions weren’t asked, as if those were not important.”

Jeter said three men were largely responsible for her improvement.

Famed sprint coach John Smith, whom she began working with in late 2008. A doctor, Craig Dossman, who worked on her body twice a week. And a nutritionist, Wayne Douglas.

At the 2012 Olympics, Jeter took silver behind Jamaican Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce in the 100m and bronze in the 200m behind Allyson Felix and Fraser-Pryce. She capped the meet by anchoring the U.S. 4x100m relay team to gold in a world-record time.

At the world championships, Jeter took 100m gold in 2011 and bronze in 2007, 2009 and 2013. She is the only U.S. man or woman to win an Olympic or world 100m title in this Jamaican-dominated era.

Jeter is now the same age as the oldest U.S. Olympic sprinter in history (Gail Devers was also 37 at the 2004 Athens Games). If she does come back, it will only be in the 100m, and likely not for another Olympics.

“If I just stay training and stay healthy, then we’re talking a different conversation in 2019,” Jeter said. “But for right now, 2020 is a bit far. It’s like looking down a long hallway. That’s really not where my eyes are set right now, but who knows what could happen.”

What’s for sure is that Jeter would be pleased if another woman comes along and runs faster than her 10.64.

“One thing I always say is somebody will come along and evolve,” she said.

Rio Olympic 100m champion Elaine Thompson of Jamaica is 24 years old and last year ran 10.70. This year, she has already run 10.78 into a slight headwind with the world championships still to come in August.

“Is she capable of running faster than me? Yes, she is,” Jeter said. “I’m not a hater. If it can be done, I want to see it.”

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Serena Williams eyes Australian Open return after pregnancy

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Serena Williams hopes to return from pregnancy (due date by the end of the summer) to defend her Australian Open title in January, according to Vogue.

“It’s the most outrageous plan,” Williams said, according to the report. “I just want to put that out there. That’s, like, three months after I give birth. I’m not walking anything back, but I’m just saying it’s pretty intense.”

Williams, a four-time Olympic gold medalist, won her 23rd Grand Slam singles title last January and, two months later, said she played that event while about two months pregnant.

Williams, 35, is already the oldest Grand Slam women’s singles champion in the Open Era. That’s by virtue not of her 2017 Australian Open title but of her 2016 Wimbledon crown.

She hopes to pass Margaret Court‘s record of 24 Grand Slaim singles titles, though Court won the majority of her events before the Open Era began in 1968.

“In this game you can go dark fast,” Williams said, according to the report. “If I lose, and I lose again, it’s like, she’s done. Especially since I’m not 20 years old. I’ll tell you this much: I won’t win less. Either I win, or I don’t play.”

As for another Olympics?

“I can’t promise that … Tokyo 2020 is a lot,” Williams said on Japanese TV on Jan. 28 after winning the Australian Open, while knowing she was already, secretly, two months pregnant.

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Vuelta a España TV, live stream schedule

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Less than a month after winning his fourth Tour de France, Chris Froome returns to headline the Vuelta a España, the final Grand Tour of the season, with daily live coverage on NBC Sports Gold’s Cycling Pass and the Olympic Channel: Home of Team USA.

Olympic Channel coverage will be live streamed on OlympicChannel.com, the Olympic Channel app, NBCSports.com/live and the NBC Sports app.

NBCSN will also air encore broadcasts of select stages.

NBC Sports Gold coverage will be commercial-free.

Froome, eyeing his first Tour of Spain win after a trio of runners-up, is joined by Spaniard Alberto Contador, who has won every Grand Tour multiple times and is set to retire after this event.

Rounding out the marquee men is 2014 Tour de France champion Vincenzo Nibali, who also captured the Vuelta back in 2010.

Romain Bardet and Fabio Aru, who challenged Froome at the Tour de France last month, are also in the Vuelta field.

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Day Time (ET) Network Stage
Saturday, Aug. 19 11:25 a.m.-1:30 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 1
Saturday, Aug. 19 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 1
Sunday, Aug. 20 9 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 2
Sunday, Aug. 20 12-2 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 2
Monday, Aug. 21 7:10 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 3
Monday, Aug. 21 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 3
Monday, Aug. 21 12 p.m. NBCSN Stage 3
Tuesday, Aug. 22 9 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 4
Tuesday, Aug. 22 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 4
Wednesday, Aug. 23 9 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 5
Wednesday, Aug. 23 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 5
Thursday, Aug. 24 9 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 6
Thursday, Aug. 24 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 6
Friday, Aug. 25 9 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 7
Friday, Aug. 25 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 7
Friday, Aug. 25 5 p.m. NBCSN Stage 7
Saturday, Aug. 26 9 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 8
Saturday, Aug. 26 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 8
Sunday, Aug. 27 9 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 9
Sunday, Aug. 27 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 9
Tuesday, Aug. 29 9 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 10
Tuesday, Aug. 29 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 10
Tuesday, Aug. 29 6:30 p.m. NBCSN Stage 10
Wednesday, Aug. 30 9 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 11
Wednesday, Aug. 30 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 11
Thursday, Aug. 31 9 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 12
Thursday, Aug. 31 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 12
Thursday, Aug. 31 1 p.m. NBCSN Stage 12
Friday, Sept. 1 9 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 13
Friday, Sept. 1 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 13
Saturday, Sept. 2 9 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 14
Saturday, Sept. 2 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 14
Sunday, Sept. 3 7:45 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 15
Sunday, Sept. 3 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 15
Tuesday, Sept. 5 9 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 16
Tuesday, Sept. 5 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 16
Tuesday, Sept. 5 9 p.m. NBCSN Stage 16
Wednesday, Sept. 6 6:25 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 17
Wednesday, Sept. 6 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 17
Thursday, Sept. 7 9 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 18
Thursday, Sept. 7 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 18
Friday, Sept. 8 9 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 19
Friday, Sept. 8 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 19
Saturday, Sept. 9 8:15 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 20
Saturday, Sept. 9 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 20
Sunday, Sept. 10 10:55 a.m.-3 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 21
Sunday, Sept. 10 1-3 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 21
Sunday, Sept. 10 7 p.m. NBCSN Stage 21