Katie Ledecky, Simone Manuel
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Katie Ledecky, Chase Kalisz top U.S. swim rankings as nationals near

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The U.S. Championships in three weeks will herald a changing of the guard in many events.

Katie Ledecky is the only active member of the Big Four. Michael Phelps is retired, Ryan Lochte is suspended and Missy Franklin is out of competition indefinitely after shoulder surgeries.

Ledecky continued her dominance as the headliner of this spring’s Pro Series meets, impressive coming off a long freshman season at Stanford.

Now that the six-event series is finished, the 2017 U.S. rankings have come into view going into nationals, where the top two per individual event qualify for the world championships in Budapest in July. The top six in the 100m and 200m frees will likely qualify for relays.

The rankings for Olympic events (plus the men’s 800m free and women’s 1500m free) are below, but first some notes:

  • Ledecky is again No. 1 by a comfortable margin in the 200m, 400m, 800m and 1500m freestyles. She’s likely to repeat her 2015 World Championships slate, where she became the first swimmer to sweep those four races at a single worlds. She could also go for the 4x100m and 4x200m free relays, which would mean a possible six gold medals to tie Franklin’s record from 2013. Though Ledecky ranks No. 1 in the U.S. in the 400m individual medley by nearly one second, she’s not expected to race it at nationals.
  • Ledecky’s world-record times from the last two years in the 800m and 1500m frees would rank No. 4 on the U.S. men’s 800m and 1500m free lists for 2017. The U.S. has zero men who have met the A standard in either event, which means it will only be able to send one entry per event if nobody hits the standard at trials.
  • In the absence of Phelps and Lochte, Chase Kalisz emerged as the U.S.’ best all-around swimmer. The Olympic 400m IM silver medalist leads the rankings in both IMs, plus the 200m butterfly.
  • Ryan Murphy, who swept the backstrokes in Rio, will likely go into nationals ranked second in both events.
  • Anthony Ervin, who won Rio Olympic 50m free gold at age 35, ranks No. 16 in the U.S. this year.

Men
50m freestyle
1. Nathan Adrian (22.09)
2. Caeleb Dressel (22.13)
3. Michael Chadwick (22.22)
4. Michael Andrew (22.38)

100m freestyle
1. Nathan Adrian (48.18)
2. Michael Chadwick (48.69)

3. Blake Pieroni (49.18)
4. Caeleb Dressel (49.26)
5. Ryan Held (49.32)
6. Michael Jensen (49.35)
7. Justin Ress (49.48)
8. Ryan Murphy (49.60)

200m freestyle (1:47.73 A standard)
1. Blake Pieroni (1:48.14)
2. Zane Grothe (1:48.73)
3. Jay Litherland (1:49.28)
4. Patrick Callan (1:49.41)
5. Jack Conger (1:49.44)
6. Drew Kiebler (1:49.45)
7. Conor Dwyer (1:49.47)
8. Gunnar Bentz (1:49.54)

400m freestyle (3:48.15 A standard)
1. Zane Grothe (3:47.99)
2. Clark Smith (3:49.40)
3. Jay Litherland (3:50.96)
4. Andrew Abruzzo (3:51.01)

800m freestyle (7:54.31 A standard)
1. True Sweetser (8:01.44)
2. Zane Grothe (8:01.94)
3. Clark Smith (8:02.34)
4. Liam Egan (8:05.10)

1500m freestyle (15:12.79 A standard)
1. Andrew Abruzzo (15:13.95)
2. Zane Grothe (15:22.05)
3. True Sweetser (15:23.95)
4. Michael Brinegar (15:25.70)

100m backstroke
1. Matt Grevers (53.31)
2. Ryan Murphy (53.48)

3. Justin Ress (53.49)
4. Jacob Pebley (53.77)

200m backstroke
1. Jacob Pebley (1:55.56)
2. Ryan Murphy (1:55.82)
3. Sean Lehane (1:59.57)
4. Drew Kibler (2:00.22)

100m breaststroke
1. Cody Miller (1:00.30)
2. Kevin Cordes (1:00.43)
3. Andrew Wilson (1:00.45)
4. Nic Fink (1:00.70)

200m breaststroke
1. Josh Prenot (2:09.93)
2. Nic Fink (2:10.62)
3. Chase Kalisz (2:10.74)
2. Kevin Cordes (2:11.50)

100m butterfly
1. Tom Shields (52.09)
2. Jack Conger (52.24)
3. Caeleb Dressel (52.29)
4. Tripp Cooper (52.84)

200m butterfly
1. Chase Kalisz (1:55.82)
2. Pace Clark (1:56.75)

3. Tom Shields (1:58.05)
4. Jack Conger (1:58.44)

200m individual medley
1. Chase Kalisz (1:57.21)
2. Josh Prenot (1:58.93)
3. Michael Andrew (1:59.12)
4. Jay Litherland (2:00.48)

400m individual medley
1. Chase Kalisz (4:09.43)
2. Jay Litherland (4:13.79)
3. Josh Prenot (4:14.74)
4. Abrahm DeVine (4:17.57)

Women
50m freestyle

1. Simone Manuel (24.66)
2. Madison Kennedy (24.99)
3. Kelsi Worrell (25.11)
4. Lia Neal (25.12)

100m freestyle
1. Simone Manuel (53.66)
2. Mallory Comerford (53.91)
3. Lia Neal (54.38)
4. Amanda Weir (54.59)
5. Katie Ledecky (54.69)
6. Kelsi Worrell (54.84)
7. Abbey Weitzeil (55.05)
8. Courtney Caldwell (55.11)

200m freestyle
1. Katie Ledecky (1:55.34)
2. Melanie Margalis (1:57.69)
3. Leah Smith (1:57.72)
4. Simone Manuel (1:57.87)
5. Mallory Comerford (1:58.54)
6. Katie Drabot (1:58.85)
7. Katie McLaughlin (1:59.11)
8. Hali Flickinger (1:59.20)

400m freestyle
1. Katie Ledecky (4:00.98)
2. Leah Smith (4:05.62)
3. Katie Drabot (4:08.07)
4. Hali Flickinger (4:08.52)

800m freestyle
1. Katie Ledecky (8:15.44)
2. Leah Smith (8:23.27)
3. Cierra Runge (8:29.27)
4. Ashley Twichell (8:30.19)

1500m freestyle
1. Katie Ledecky (15:35.65)
2. Hannah Moore (16:22.96)

3. G Ryan (16:25.64)
4. Leah Stevens (16:36.13)

100m backstroke
1. Hannah Stevens (59.40)
2. Ali Deloof (59.43)
3. Regan Smith (59.74)
4. Olivia Smoliga (1:00.70)

200m backstroke
1. Regan Smith (2:09.79)
2. Asia Seidt (2:09.82)
3. Eva Merrell (2:10.22)
4. Hali Flickinger (2:10.56)

100m breaststroke
1. Katie Meili (1:05.95)
2. Lilly King (1:06.20)
3. Molly Hannis (1:06.47)
4. Breeja Larson (1:07.17)

200m breaststroke
1. Katie Meili (2:23.18)
2. Madisyn Cox (2:25.62)
3. Melanie Margalis (2:25.71)
4. Lilly King (2:25.90)

100m butterfly
1. Kelsi Worrell (57.44)
2. Amanda Kendall (58.27)
3. Kendyl Stewart (58.32)
4. Hellen Moffitt (58.59)

200m butterfly
1. Hali Flickinger (2:08.77)
2. Kelsi Worrell (2:09.04)
3. Cassidy Bayer (2:10.16)
4. Katie McLaughlin (2:10.35)

200m individual medley
1. Melanie Margalis (2:10.43)
2. Madisyn Cox (2:11.14)
3. Ella Eastin (2:14.04)
4. Alex Walsh (2:14.37)

400m individual medley
1. Katie Ledecky (4:38.16)
2. Madisyn Cox (4:39.07)
3. Elizabeth Beisel (4:40.00)
4. Melanie Margalis (4:40.47)

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IOC expects decisions on Russian doping cases next month

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Investigators at the International Olympic Committee expect to have “a number” of doping cases involving Russians at the Sochi Olympics resolved by the end of November, but they have no plans to dictate the eligibility of these athletes for next year’s Winter Games in PyeongChang.

The leader of an IOC delegation in charge of reviewing 28 cases involving athletes at Sochi wrote to the head of the IOC Athletes Commission this week to update the timeline of cases stemming from a report detailing a Russian doping scheme at the 2014 Olympics and beforehand.

Denis Oswald said that of the cases his committee is reviewing, priority has been given to those involving athletes looking to compete in PyeongChang. Top priority goes to six cross-country skiers whose provisional suspensions expire Oct. 31.

Oswald also said his committee would rule on these athletes’ results for Sochi, but will not determine their eligibility for PyeongChang, instead handing over evidence to their respective sports federations to decide.

The IOC also appointed a task force to look at the Russian doping scandal as a whole, the results of which could have wider repercussions on the country’s eligibility at next year’s Olympics.

In a separate letter sent to worldwide sports leaders, IOC President Thomas Bach said only that the Schmid Commission is continuing its evaluation and that “I hope that the IOC Executive Board will still be able to take a decision this year because none of us want this serious issue to overshadow” the upcoming Olympics.

The updates come amid a growing chorus of calls for a timely decision and for Russia’s ouster from PyeongChang.

The IOC commissions are operating off information from the McLaren Report, the first part of which was released in July 2016.

In explaining the timeline, Oswald wrote that because the Russian scheme involved exchanging dirty urine samples with clean ones, it took time to adopt methods to verify that samples had been tampered with — in part by finding evidence of scratch marks on collection bottles that had been opened and re-sealed.

“The task has not been easy in both establishing a methodology in an area in which there are no established protocols,” he wrote, “and then moving through the necessary scientific analysis of each individual sample in a way which would withstand legal challenge.”

MORE: USOC boss calls for immediate action on Russian doping

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Two-time Olympian becomes first woman to lead U.S. national swim team

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COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (AP) — Two-time Olympian Lindsay Mintenko has been picked to lead the U.S. national swimming team. She is the first woman to hold the title.

USA Swimming made the announcement Wednesday.

Mintenko replaces Frank Busch, who retired Oct. 1 as managing director. She has been a member of the national team staff since 2006.

During her swimming career, Mintenko won gold medals as a U.S. team captain at the 2000 and 2004 Olympics 800m freestyle relay and added a silver in 2004 on the 400m freestyle relay.

USA Swimming also announced an organizational restructuring that will place all technical divisions, including the national team, under the oversight of chief operating officer Mike Unger.

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