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Olympic taekwondo star accused of sexual abuse, report says

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Two brothers under investigation for sexual misconduct were allowed to take part in the Rio Olympics last summer, according to a report.

USA Today reported that USA Taekwondo began investigating claims against Steven and Jean Lopez more than two years ago after multiple women said the brothers sexually assaulted them.

The organizing body consulted with the U.S. Olympic Committee and agreed to halt the probe before the Olympics, according to USA Today. That meant Steven Lopez – a 38-year-old, three-time Olympic medalist – and Jean, at 43 a veteran coach, could participate.

The newspaper obtained a March 22 letter from investigating attorney Donald Alperstein to one of the women in which he said he notified the FBI “because so much of the misconduct occurred in multiple jurisdictions” and added that he “felt the Lopez brothers needed to be removed from the sport.”

Both brothers denied sexual assault allegations made by four women to the newspaper and to investigators.

“I’ve never been inappropriate with anyone,” Jean Lopez said.

Mandy Meloon, a former taekwondo participant who says Jean Lopez molested her in 1997 when she was 16, said an FBI agent interviewed her for roughly two hours on May 19. She said she provided names of other women who say they were abused by the Lopez brothers and others in the sport.

Heidi Gilbert, another former athlete, told the newspaper that Jean Lopez drugged and sexually assaulted her. She said she did not contact law enforcement officials because “they’re not going to believe me, nothing is going to happen.” She said she did detail the allegations to investigators for USA Taekwondo and the U.S. Center for SafeSport.

Another woman, identified only as a former member of the junior national team, said she was drugged three times and that Steven Lopez once had sex with her while she was unconscious. She also notified USA Taekwondo and SafeSport but not law enforcement.

The Associated Press doesn’t typically name victims of sex abuse, but Meloon and Gilbert made their accusations publicly.

USOC spokesman Patrick Sandusky said in a statement provided to the newspaper that “preventing and responding to sexual abuse is something we take incredibly seriously” and is why it founded SafeSport, which operates independently from the USOC. The organizing body declined to specifically address questions about the Lopez brothers and the investigation.

“When the center opened in March, we appropriately submitted the taekwondo matter for its review, and to comment publicly in the midst of the center’s investigation would be inappropriate,” Sandusky said.

IOC expects decisions on Russian doping cases next month

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Investigators at the International Olympic Committee expect to have “a number” of doping cases involving Russians at the Sochi Olympics resolved by the end of November, but they have no plans to dictate the eligibility of these athletes for next year’s Winter Games in PyeongChang.

The leader of an IOC delegation in charge of reviewing 28 cases involving athletes at Sochi wrote to the head of the IOC Athletes Commission this week to update the timeline of cases stemming from a report detailing a Russian doping scheme at the 2014 Olympics and beforehand.

Denis Oswald said that of the cases his committee is reviewing, priority has been given to those involving athletes looking to compete in PyeongChang. Top priority goes to six cross-country skiers whose provisional suspensions expire Oct. 31.

Oswald also said his committee would rule on these athletes’ results for Sochi, but will not determine their eligibility for PyeongChang, instead handing over evidence to their respective sports federations to decide.

The IOC also appointed a task force to look at the Russian doping scandal as a whole, the results of which could have wider repercussions on the country’s eligibility at next year’s Olympics.

In a separate letter sent to worldwide sports leaders, IOC President Thomas Bach said only that the Schmid Commission is continuing its evaluation and that “I hope that the IOC Executive Board will still be able to take a decision this year because none of us want this serious issue to overshadow” the upcoming Olympics.

The updates come amid a growing chorus of calls for a timely decision and for Russia’s ouster from PyeongChang.

The IOC commissions are operating off information from the McLaren Report, the first part of which was released in July 2016.

In explaining the timeline, Oswald wrote that because the Russian scheme involved exchanging dirty urine samples with clean ones, it took time to adopt methods to verify that samples had been tampered with — in part by finding evidence of scratch marks on collection bottles that had been opened and re-sealed.

“The task has not been easy in both establishing a methodology in an area in which there are no established protocols,” he wrote, “and then moving through the necessary scientific analysis of each individual sample in a way which would withstand legal challenge.”

MORE: USOC boss calls for immediate action on Russian doping

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Two-time Olympian becomes first woman to lead U.S. national swim team

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COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (AP) — Two-time Olympian Lindsay Mintenko has been picked to lead the U.S. national swimming team. She is the first woman to hold the title.

USA Swimming made the announcement Wednesday.

Mintenko replaces Frank Busch, who retired Oct. 1 as managing director. She has been a member of the national team staff since 2006.

During her swimming career, Mintenko won gold medals as a U.S. team captain at the 2000 and 2004 Olympics 800m freestyle relay and added a silver in 2004 on the 400m freestyle relay.

USA Swimming also announced an organizational restructuring that will place all technical divisions, including the national team, under the oversight of chief operating officer Mike Unger.

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