Mark Cavendish, yellow jersey crash at Tour de France (video)

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Mark Cavendish crashed hard in the final straightaway sprint after colliding with Peter Sagan at the Tour de France on Tuesday.

The 30-time Tour stage winner said he reinjured his right shoulder but did not have specifics.

“I’m not a doctor, but the feelings, I’m not optimistic,” Cavendish said, his right arm wrapped in a sling.

Arnaud Demare won the stage after multiple crashes in the last mile, becoming the first Frenchman to win a bunch sprint since 2006.

Shortly before that, Tour leader Geraint Thomas hit the pavement due to riders crashing ahead of him but appeared not to suffer serious injury. He retained the yellow jersey.

Then, on the final straightaway, Cavendish was squeezed into a barrier on the right side after colliding with Peter Sagan‘s right arm.

Cavendish spent minutes on the ground but eventually got back on his bike and rolled across the finish line favoring his right arm. The right side of his jersey was ripped apart, and Cavendish’s right hand was bandaged.

Sagan found Cavendish outside Cavendish’s Dimension Data team bus, and the two exchanged calm words.

“I get [along] with Peter,” Cavendish repeated. “If he came across it’s one thing, but his elbow, I’m not a fan. … I’d like to know about the elbow.”

Sagan said he didn’t have time to move left as Cavendish came up his right. The five-time Tour green sprinters’ jersey winner said he apologized.

“Yeah, for sure, because it’s not nice to crash like that,” Sagan said.

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Cavendish is riding this year’s Tour after being diagnosed with the Epstein-Barr virus in April. He has 30 career Tour stage wins, four shy of Eddy Merckx‘s record.

Cannondale–Drapac’s Nate Brown, who on Monday took the King of the Mountains polka-dot jersey from countryman Taylor Phinney, retained that jersey Tuesday. He’s the first American to do so in Tour history.

Wednesday’s Stage 5 is 100 miles, but the key is the final eight kilometers. The general classification contenders will be put on notice on the short, steep ascent to the La Planche des Belles Filles. This is where Chris Froome won his first Tour stage in 2012.

NBC Sports Gold and NBCSN’s live coverage starts at 7 a.m. ET.

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MORE: 10 Tour de France riders to watch

Stage 4
1. Arnaud Demare (FRA) — 4:53:54
2. Peter Sagan (SVK) — +:00
3. Alexander Kristoff (NOR) — +:00
4. Andre Greipel (GER) — +:00
5. Nacer Bouhanni (FRA) — +:00

General Classification
1. Geraint Thomas (GBR) — 14:54:25
2. Peter Sagan (SVK) — +:07
3. Chris Froome (GBR) — +:12
4. Michael Matthews (AUS) — +:12
5. Edvald Boasson Hagen (NOR) — +:16

Green Bay Packers pull another Olympic sport TD celebration

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We’re halfway to a decathlon of Olympic sport touchdown celebrations over the last two seasons.

After the hurdles, the long jump, the bobsled and the relay came the race walk on Sunday.

Green Bay Packers wide receiver Davante Adams, once part of a three-man bobsled team, led three other teammates in a race walk after scoring in Sunday’s loss to the Carolina Panthers. (Adams later left the game with a concussion.)

Adams won the race walk, which was much, much shorter than the standard Olympic distances of 20km and 50km, over teammates Jordy NelsonRandall Cobb and Geronimo Allison.

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Canada in control of hockey rivalry going into Olympics

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Four years ago, the U.S. women’s hockey team rode a four-game winning streak over rival Canada into the Olympics, then lost both games in Sochi, including a gut-wrenching overtime final.

This time, Canada goes into the Winter Games having won four straight.

The Canadians beat the Americans 2-1 in overtime in Edmonton on Sunday night, taking their pre-Olympic series 5-3 overall.

“I don’t think it was our best performance,” Canada coach Laura Schuler said. “There’s still more work to do.”

The Canadians were led by their stalwarts — captain Marie-Philip Poulin scored in regulation, Sochi gold medalist Jennifer Wakefield scored 26 seconds into overtime and longtime goalie Shannon Szabados stopped 34 of 35 shots.

Hilary Knight netted the U.S. goal, with Maddie Rooney making 24 saves.

“The goal for us is to be hitting on all cylinders in February,” U.S. coach Robb Stauber said.

The U.S. appeared to be in that kind of form until about two weeks ago.

Before this losing streak, the U.S. had a 12-4 record against Canada since the start of 2015, including taking the last three world championship finals.

At one point, the U.S. won six straight games over a 12-month stretch, its longest streak over Canada since it famously won eight straight going into the 2002 Salt Lake City Olympics then lost the gold-medal game.

Canada also beat the U.S. in their last four meetings before the 2006 Olympics and five straight going into the 2010 Olympics.

The U.S. Olympic team will be announced Jan. 1. The national-team roster is at 25 players (22 skaters, three goalies), but the Olympic roster is 23 (20 skaters, three goalies).

“Can’t live in the past, can’t live in the future, so tonight we were worried about this game,” U.S. captain Meghan Duggan said, according to the Canadian Press. “We weren’t looking ahead to February.”

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