Mark Cavendish, yellow jersey crash at Tour de France (video)

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Mark Cavendish crashed hard in the final straightaway sprint after colliding with Peter Sagan at the Tour de France on Tuesday.

The 30-time Tour stage winner said he reinjured his right shoulder but did not have specifics.

“I’m not a doctor, but the feelings, I’m not optimistic,” Cavendish said, his right arm wrapped in a sling.

Arnaud Demare won the stage after multiple crashes in the last mile, becoming the first Frenchman to win a bunch sprint since 2006.

Shortly before that, Tour leader Geraint Thomas hit the pavement due to riders crashing ahead of him but appeared not to suffer serious injury. He retained the yellow jersey.

Then, on the final straightaway, Cavendish was squeezed into a barrier on the right side after colliding with Peter Sagan‘s right arm.

Cavendish spent minutes on the ground but eventually got back on his bike and rolled across the finish line favoring his right arm. The right side of his jersey was ripped apart, and Cavendish’s right hand was bandaged.

Sagan found Cavendish outside Cavendish’s Dimension Data team bus, and the two exchanged calm words.

“I get [along] with Peter,” Cavendish repeated. “If he came across it’s one thing, but his elbow, I’m not a fan. … I’d like to know about the elbow.”

Sagan said he didn’t have time to move left as Cavendish came up his right. The five-time Tour green sprinters’ jersey winner said he apologized.

“Yeah, for sure, because it’s not nice to crash like that,” Sagan said.

TOUR: Results/Standings | Highlights | Broadcast Schedule

Cavendish is riding this year’s Tour after being diagnosed with the Epstein-Barr virus in April. He has 30 career Tour stage wins, four shy of Eddy Merckx‘s record.

Cannondale–Drapac’s Nate Brown, who on Monday took the King of the Mountains polka-dot jersey from countryman Taylor Phinney, retained that jersey Tuesday. He’s the first American to do so in Tour history.

Wednesday’s Stage 5 is 100 miles, but the key is the final eight kilometers. The general classification contenders will be put on notice on the short, steep ascent to the La Planche des Belles Filles. This is where Chris Froome won his first Tour stage in 2012.

NBC Sports Gold and NBCSN’s live coverage starts at 7 a.m. ET.

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MORE: 10 Tour de France riders to watch

Stage 4
1. Arnaud Demare (FRA) — 4:53:54
2. Peter Sagan (SVK) — +:00
3. Alexander Kristoff (NOR) — +:00
4. Andre Greipel (GER) — +:00
5. Nacer Bouhanni (FRA) — +:00

General Classification
1. Geraint Thomas (GBR) — 14:54:25
2. Peter Sagan (SVK) — +:07
3. Chris Froome (GBR) — +:12
4. Michael Matthews (AUS) — +:12
5. Edvald Boasson Hagen (NOR) — +:16

Michael Phelps still has ‘no desire’ to come back

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Michael Phelps says he has “no desire” to return to competitive swimming, but he is eager to stay involved with the sport and cheer on those who follow in his enormous wake.

In an interview Tuesday with The Associated Press while promoting a healthy pet food campaign, Phelps said he is excited about the birth of his second child and numerous opportunities away from the pool.

It was around this time four years ago when Phelps got serious about ending his first retirement, but he now seems content with his decision to step away again after the Rio Olympics.

His wife, Nicole, is about four months pregnant. The couple already has a 16-month-old son, Boomer.

“I’ve got no desire, no desire to come back,” the 32-year-old Phelps said flatly.

Phelps has attended a handful of swimming meets since the Rio Games, where the winningest athlete in Olympic history added to his already massive career haul by claiming five gold medals plus a silver. A few months ago, he conceded to the AP that he was eager to see how he would feel about a possible comeback after this year’s world championships in Budapest, Hungary.

Turns out, it had no impact.

Phelps said watching others compete “truly didn’t kick anything off or spike any more interest in coming out of retirement again.”

He is eager to follow the development of his heir apparent, Caeleb Dressel, who emerged as the sport’s newest star by winning seven gold medals at Budapest. The 21-year-old Floridian joined Phelps and Mark Spitz as the only swimmers to accomplish that feat at a major international meet.

“I’m happy Caeleb decided to go off this year instead of last year,” Phelps joked. “I’m kind of happy to see him swimming so well when I’m not there.”

With Dressel and Katie Ledecky now leading the American team, the U.S. is expected to remain the world’s dominant swimming country heading into the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

Even without Phelps.

“It’s time to kind of move on,” he said, “and watch other people come into their own.”

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MORE: Michael Phelps: I’d give Conor McGregor a head start

Dutch cyclist returns from horrific Rio crash to win world title

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Dutch road cyclist Annemiek van Vleuten came back from this dramatic Rio Olympic crash to win her first world title on Tuesday, taking the time trial in Bergen, Norway.

“This one is really beautiful without the crash in Rio, but this makes the story really, really special,” an emotional van Vleuten said. “Actually, I still cannot believe it. … This season I’m surprising myself what I can do. To be world champion in the time trial, I never thought I’d be able of this.”

Van Vleuten, 34, covered the 13-mile course in 28 minutes, 50.35 seconds, topping countrywoman Anna ven der Breggen by 12 seconds.

Australian Katrin Garfoot took bronze, 19.02 seconds ahead of Chloe Dygert, a U.S. Olympic silver medalist in track cycling. American Amber Neben, the defending champion, was 11th.

Full results are here.

In Rio, van Vleuten suffered three small spine fractures and a concussion when her brakes appeared to lock, and she flipped over into a ditch during the road race. Van Vleuten was alone in the lead at the time with about seven miles to go of the 87-mile course.

She was eventually hospitalized in intensive care.

Van der Breggen went on to win the Olympic title.

Van Vleuten wasn’t out long. She raced at last October’s world championships, placing a career-high fifth in the time trial. She then won La Course in France, a two-day race, in July.

“To be an athlete is to have really ups and downs,” van Vleuten said Tuesday. “Sometimes really downs, but the downs make the ups even more beautiful, I think.”

Van Vleuten’s first celebratory act Tuesday was to climb past two barriers and into her mother’s arms.

“Last year my mum watched the Rio race on television, it was her birthday and she was with lots of my family, so it was a really hard day for her,” Van Vleuten said in a news conference, according to Cyclingnews.com. “My father died in 2008, and so it was really special to have her here and celebrate the good things of cycling together. We’ve dealt with bad things together in the past, so it’s important to be really happy and proud to celebrate and to also remember my father.”

The world championships continue Wednesday with the men’s time trial at 7 a.m. ET on the Olympic Channel: Home of Team USA and streaming on NBCSports.com/live.

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MORE: World Road Cycling Championships broadcast schedule