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IOC set to award 2024, 2028 Olympics at Lima session

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It is scheduled to become official on Wednesday at about 2 p.m. ET in Lima, Peru.

International Olympic Committee members will ratify an agreement among Los Angeles, Paris and Olympic leaders that awards the 2024 Olympics to Paris and the 2028 Olympics to Los Angeles.

Then the host-city contracts will be signed, sealing what the IOC has called a “win-win-win” situation that arose last year and came together earlier this summer.

The last time two Olympic hosts were determined at once was in 1921, when the 1924 Paris and 1928 Amsterdam Games were awarded, according to Olympstats.com. LA and Paris will join London as the only cities to host the Olympics three times.

The U.S. will host its first Olympics since 2002 (and first Summer Games since 1996). Paris will host for the first time since 1924.

The U.S. ends its longest drought between hosting an Olympics since the 28-year gap between 1932 and 1960. It failed in bids for 2012 (New York City) and 2016 (Chicago).

Paris was a finalist for 1992, 2008 and 2012.

MORE: Paris Olympic bid plan includes Eiffel Tower area

How the joint 2024-2028 decision came about:

Dec. 8: Given strong bids from Paris and LA, IOC president Thomas Bach is asked twice about the possibility of awarding the 2024 and 2028 Olympics at the Lima session rather than just the 2024 Games. He doesn’t categorically rule it out while saying the current bid process — having separate bid competitions culminating seven years before each Games — “produces too many losers.”

Feb. 18: Bach welcomes talk of awarding the 2024 and 2028 Olympics together, saying, “There are many options.”

March 17: A working group of IOC vice presidents is established to study changing the Olympic bid candidate process, including possibly awarding the 2024 and 2028 Olympics in 2017.

June 9: The IOC executive board recommends awarding both the 2024 and 2028 Olympics this summer to the two remaining 2024 finalists — Los Angeles and Paris.

July 11: IOC members ratify the proposal to award both the 2024 and 2028 Olympics this summer. If LA and Paris can’t reach an agreement on which city gets which Games, then a Lima vote for 2024 only will take place in September.

July 31: LA bid officials say they reached an agreement to cede the 2024 Olympics to Paris and take the 2028 Olympics in a deal that includes extra IOC funds ahead of the 2028 Games.

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MORE: Los Angeles Olympic bid venue plan

Men’s Curling Night 5: Japan routs USA

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On a night like Saturday, there’s very few teams who could defeat Japan. Unfortunately, Team USA was the one who had to go up against them.

Japan held John Shuster’s team to just two points in seven ends of play in an 8-2 rout of the Americans.

Both teams were tied for fourth in the team standings heading into the game. The U.S. falls to 2-3, now tied for fifth. Japan improves to 3-2, tied for third overall.

Click here for a full recap from tonight’s curling action

Other results: 
NOR def. DEN 10-8
SUI def. CAN 8-6
Current Team Standings:
1. Sweden 5-0
2. Canada 4-2
3. Switzerland 4-2
4. Japan 3-2
5. USA 2-3
6. Great Britain 2-3
7. Italy 2-3
8. Norway 2-3
9. Denmark 1-4
10. Korea 1-4

Marcel Hirscher leads GS; defending champ Ted Ligety trails

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Austria’s Marcel Hirscher leads by a commanding .63 seconds after the first of two giant slalom runs at the 2018 Winter Olympics.

Hirscher, the reigning giant slalom world champion, is in position to win his second gold medal in PyeongChang, after claiming the combined title.

American Ted Ligety, who is nicknamed “Mr. GS,” is a distant 2.44 seconds behind Hirscher.

“I just sucked,” Ligety said on NBC.

Ligety is hoping to become the first man to successfully defend an Olympic giant slalom gold medal since Italy’s Alberto Tomba in 1992.

Standings after the first run

1. Marcel Hirscher (Austria)
2. Alexis Pinturault (France) +.63 seconds
3. Leif Kristian Nestvold-Haugen (Norway) +.66 seconds
4. Riccardo Tonetti (Italy) +.75 seconds
5. Mathieu Faivre (France) +.79 seconds