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Nesta Carter testifies in relay medal appeal; court sets verdict timing

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LAUSANNE, Switzerland (AP) — Jamaican sprinter Nesta Carter has testified at the Court of Arbitration for Sport to appeal against disqualification from the 2008 Olympics in a doping case that cost Usain Bolt a 4x100m relay gold medal.

Carter shielded his face from media on arriving at sport’s highest court on Wednesday for a closed-doors hearing that ended around seven hours later.

The court said lawyers for Carter and the International Olympic Committee would submit further documents to the judging panel, which was expected to reach a verdict early in 2018.

The 32-year-old Carter is challenging his disqualification imposed by the IOC for a positive test for a banned stimulant.

Carter tested positive for methylhexaneamine last year in a reanalysis program of samples from the 2008 and 2012 Olympics.

The case spoiled Bolt’s perfect Olympic record of three gold medals — in the 100m, 200m and 4x100m — at three consecutive Games from 2008 through 2016.

Carter and Bolt were relay teammates in Beijing, where Jamaica won in a world record of 37.10 seconds. Carter ran the opening leg, and Bolt took the baton third in a team that also included Michael Frater and Asafa Powell.

Carter also teamed with Bolt on three straight world championships relay-winning teams, from 2011 through 2015. They were also teammates when Jamaica set another 4x100m world record at the 2012 London Games, running 36.84.

Dozens of athletes tested positive for banned drugs in an IOC-ordered reanalysis program using new and more accurate tests on samples stored since the 2008 and 2012 Olympics.

The majority of more than 110 cases involved steroids and athletes from the former Soviet republics. Carter’s case was the only one involving Jamaica.

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Kaetlyn Osmond wins world title after Zagitova, Kostner crumble

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Kaetlyn Osmond moved from fourth after the short program to win Canada’s first women’s world title in 45 years after Olympic champion Alina Zagitova fell three times and short-program leader Carolina Kostner also struggled jumping.

Osmond, the Olympic bronze medalist, overcame a 7.54-point deficit to Kostner and won by 12.33 points over Japan’s Wakaba Higuchi, who was eighth after the short program. Another Japanese, Satoko Miyahara, took bronze.

“To be able to make the podium was my ultimate goal,” Osmond said in Milan. “I never thought being champion was possible.”

Osmond was a national champion at age 17 in 2013. She missed the 2014-15 season with a broken leg, then went from being ranked 24th in the world in 2015-16 to winning world silver in 2017.

Kostner, at 31 looking to become the oldest female world champion in history, ended up fourth, 1.2 points out of bronze in what may have been her final competition. She fell once, had a single Axel and no triple-triple combination. Kostner won a world title in 2012 and Olympic bronze in 2014.

Zagitova, a 15-year-old looking to cap an undefeated season as the youngest Olympic and world champion since Tara Lipinski, finished fifth.

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Americans finished sixth (Bradie Tennell), 10th (Mirai Nagasu) and 12th (Mariah Bell) after the U.S. women at the Olympics were ninth (Tennell), 10th (Nagasu) and 11th (Karen Chen). No U.S. woman finished in the top six for the first time in Winter Games history.

This is the first time since 2010 that the U.S. didn’t put a woman in the top five at the annual worlds.

That said, Tennell capped her rise the last two seasons — from ninth at the 2017 U.S. Championships and seventh at the 2017 World Championships to ninth in her Olympic debut and sixth in her senior world debut. And that U.S. title from January.

Friday’s results mean the U.S. drops from three women to two for the 2019 Worlds because the top two finishes didn’t add up to 13 or fewer (sixth and seventh, for example). The last time the U.S. had fewer than the maximum three spots at an Olympics or worlds was 2013.

Worlds conclude Saturday with the free dance and men’s free skate.

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French break world record, month after Olympic wardrobe malfunction

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Gabriella Papadakis‘ dress was secure. Papadakis and Guillaume Cizeron‘s performance was extraordinary.

The French broke the world record short dance score at the world championships in Milan on Friday. Papadakis wore the same style costume that came slightly undone in the Olympic short dance and exposed her breast in South Korea.

“Back in Montreal [training after the Olympics], I just fixed a couple things in my dress, and I made sure it wouldn’t be able to break or to open in any way,” Papadakis said, before adding with a laugh, “and it didn’t.”

Papadakis and Cizeron tallied 83.73 points Friday, beating Canadians Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir‘s record from the Olympics by .06. The two-time world champs and Olympic silver medalists lead Americans Madison Hubbell and Zachary Donohue by 3.31 going into Saturday’s free dance.

Two-time world medalists Madison Chock and Evan Bates are fifth, 2.75 points out of medal position.

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The field lacks Olympic gold and bronze medalists Virtue and Moir and American siblings Maia Shibutani and Alex Shibutani. Medalists often skip the post-Olympic world championships due to off-ice opportunities, exhaustion or retirement.

Papadakis and Cizeron entered the Olympics as, at worst, co-favorites with Virtue and Moir. Though Virtue and Moir won their three head-to-heads in 2016-17, Papadakis and Cizeron this season posted the four highest total scores under the eight-year-old system in their four international events leading into PyeongChang.

Disaster struck in the Olympic short dance, where Papadakis had that wardrobe malfunction. The couple still tallied 81.93 points, just .14 off their personal best. They outscored Virtue and Moir in the free dance, but the Canadians won overall by .79.

This week, Papadakis and Cizeron eye their third world title after back-to-back crowns in 2015 and 2016 as the youngest ice dance world champs in 40 years. A triple would match Virtue and Moir and give them one more world title than 2014 Olympic champions Meryl Davis and Charlie White.

“The season has been so demanding,” Cizeron said. “It feels really good to end a season on a note like this.”

The third U.S. couple, Kaitlin Hawayek and Jean-Luc Baker, is in 15th place after Hawayek fell in their short dance. The 2014 World junior champions made the field due to the Shibutanis withdrawing.

Key Free Dance Start Times (Saturday ET)
Kaitlin Hawayek/Jean-Luc Baker (USA) — 11:27 a.m.
Anna Cappellini/Luca Lanotte (ITA) — 12:56 p.m.
Madison Chock/Evan Bates (USA) — 1:04 p.m.
Gabriella Papadakis/Guillaume Cizeron (FRA) — 1:12 p.m.
Kaitlyn Weaver/Andrew Poje (CAN) — 1:20 p.m.
Madison Hubbell/Zachary Donohue (USA) — 1:28 p.m.

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