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Winter Olympics late night: What to watch/stream

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Time zones can be tricky. Since PyeongChang is 15 hours ahead of continental America – let alone adjusting for the West Coast and Hawaii – organizing your sleeping schedule to accommodate prime viewing can be a challenging matter. That’s why we have compiled a list of late night sporting action for you.

Love short track? Set your alarm for 5:00a.m. EST. Biathlon? 6:15a.m. EST.

So, prepare your alarm clocks and get your coffee makers ready as the Olympics kick into full gear.

Short track kicks things off, with the men’s 1,5000m competition. South Koreans have every reason to feel optimistic with their Olympians’ chances as reigning world champion Seo Ri-Ya is heavily favored to win gold. On the women’s side, viewers will get a sneak peek at 18 year-old Maame Biney’s promise. The nation’s first Black American to qualify for the U.S. short track team will find herself in the midst of seasoned pros including South Korea’s three-time Olympic medalist Shim Suk-Hee and two-time world champion Choi Min-Jeung.

Plenty of other Americans are in action, including biathlete Susan Dunklee, as well as four Americans competing in the final of the ski jumping normal hill competition.

Take a look at all of the action occurring in the late hours of Friday night and into the early hours on Saturday.

Short Track

Though South Korea is fielding an exceptionally strong team, three-time Olympic medalist J.R. Celski is no stranger to Olympic grandeur and will be hoping to spring a surprise.

Men’s 1,500m Heats begin 5:00a.m. EST / 2:00a.m. PST

Men’s 1,500m Semifinals begin 6:20a.m. EST / 3:20a.m. PST

Women’s 500m Qualifying begins 6:50a.m. EST / 3:50a.m. PST

Men’s 1,500m Final begins 7:25a.m. EST / 4:25a.m. PST

Stream all events Live Here 

Cross Country Skiing

Norway’s Marit Bjorgen could leave Pyeongchang as the most decorated Winter Olympian in history. Coming into PyeongChang, the skiier owns 10 medals to her name. Elsewhere, Jessie Diggins, who won the last World Cup event heading into the Olympics, will be looking to become the first American medalist for the sport.

Women’s Skiiathlon Stream Live Here 2:15a.m. EST / 11:15p.m. PST

Luge

Germany’s Felix Loch, two time defending gold medalist, returns to the Olympics seeking his third straight triumph. American lugers Chris Mazdzer and Tucker West will be looking to grab a spot on the podium.

Men’s Runs 1 and 2 Stream  Live Here 5:10a.m. EST / 2:10a.m. PST

Speed Skating

The most successful Olympian in Sochi, the Dutch skater Ireen Wuest is again the favorite to win gold. Her compatriot Antoinette de Jong is expected to be her toughest competitor, along with Germany’s Claudia Pechstein.

Stream Live Here 6:00a.m. EST / 3:00a.m. PST

Biathlon

Susan Dunklee could very well be America’s first medalist in biathlon. Participating in the 7.5km sprint, her favorite event, the Vermont native must overcome a daunting field. Laura Dahlmeier of Germany won at least bronze in all six competitions of the six World Cup events in 2017, Slovakia’s Anastasiya Kuzmina is the two-time defending gold medalist, and Darya Domracheva possesses three gold medals of her own.

Women’s 7.5km Sprint Stream Live Here 6:15a.m. EST / 3:15a.m. PST

Ski Jumping

Four American men making their Olympic debuts have a chance to medal in the normal hill final: Kevin Bickner, Michael Glasder, Casey Larson, and William Rhoads. It will take a massive effort for any of them to overtake Germany’s Andreas Wellinger or defending Olympic gold medalist Kamil Stoch of Poland.

Men’s Normal Hill Final Stream Live Here 7:35a.m. EST / 4:35a.m. PST

Eliud Kipchoge wins London Marathon; no world record (video)

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Eliud Kipchoge won his eighth straight marathon (ninth if you count Nike’s sub-two attempt), but missed the world record at a steamy London Marathon by more than one minute on Sunday.

The Kenyan Olympic champion clocked 2:04:17, pulling away from Ethiopian Tola Kitata by 32 seconds. Mo Farah, the four-time Olympic track champ in his second marathon, finished third in 2:06:21.

Kipchoge and Kitata fell off Dennis Kimetto‘s world-record pace around the 20th mile. Kimetto ran 2:02:57 at the 2014 Berlin Marathon.

Full results are here.

The temperature eclipsed 70 degrees Farenheit during the race, making it one of the hottest London Marathons ever. Perhaps considering that, Kipchoge said he ran “a beautiful race” for his third London title in four years.

“The conditions, I can’t complain, because all of us were running in the same arena,” he told media in London. “No regrets at all.”

Farah was satisfied, too, achieving his primary goal of breaking the 33-year-old British record held by Steve Jones.

“If you looked at the field before the start of that race, you would never have put me third place,” said Farah, who ran nearly two minutes faster than his marathon debut in London in 2014. “You would put ahead of me so many other guys.”

No world record in the women’s race, either. Kenyan Vivian Cheruiyot won in 2:18:31, passing pre-race favorite Mary Keitany in the 23rd mile. Cheruiyot won by 1 minute, 42 seconds over countrywoman Brigid Kosgei. Keitany slowed to fifth in 2:24:27.

Cheruiyot, a 34-year-old mom, made her marathon debut in London last year, finishing fourth. Before that, Cheruiyot earned four Olympic medals on the track, plus four world titles combined in the 5000m and 10,000m.

Paula Radcliffe‘s world record with male pacers — 2:15:25 from 2003 — was a target for Keitany. Last year, Keitany broke Radcliffe’s world record without male pacers by 41 seconds, winning her third London title in 2:17:01.

The other leading contender Sunday, Ethiopian Tirunesh Dibaba, stopped in the 20th mile.

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MORE: Shalane Flanagan looks to future after last Boston Marathon

2018 London Marathon results

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Top finishers from the 38th London Marathon (full searchable results here) …

Men’s Elite
1. Eliud Kipchoge (KEN) 2:04:17
2. Tola Kitata (ETH) 2:04:49
3. Mo Farah (GBR) 2:06:21
4. Abel Kirui (KEN) 2:07:07
5. Bedan Karoki (KEN) 2:08:34
6. Kenenisa Bekele (ETH) 2:08:53
7. Lawrence Cherono (KEN) 2:09:25
8. Daniel Wanjiru (KEN) 2:10:35
9. Amanuel Mesel (ERI) 2:11:52
10. Yohanes Gebregergish (ER) 2:12:09
17. Guye Adola (ETH) 2:32:35

Women’s Elite
1. Vivian Cheruiyot (KEN) 2:18:31
2. Brigid Kosgei (KEN) 2:20:13
3. Tadelech Bekele (ETH) 2:21:40
4. Gladys Cherono (KEN) 2:24:10
5. Mary Keitany (KEN) 2:24:27
6. Rose Chelimo (BRN) 2:26:03
7. Mare Dibaba (ETH) 2:27:45
8. Lily Partridge (GBR) 2:29:24
9. Tracy Barlow (GBR) 2:32:09
10. Stephanie Bruce (USA) 2:32:28
DNF. Tirunesh Dibaba (ETH)

Men’s Wheelchair
1. David Weir (GBR) 1:31:15
2. Marcel Hug (SUI) 1:31:15
3. Daniel Romanchuk (USA) 1:31:16
4. Josh George (USA) 1:31:24
5. Kurt Fearnley (AUS) 1:31:24

Women’s Wheelchair
1. Madison de Rozario (AUS) 1:42:58
2. Tatyana McFadden (USA) 1:42:58
3. Susannah Scaroni (USA) 1:43:00
4. Manuela Schar (SUI) 1:43:01
5. Amanda McGrory (USA) 1:43:04

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MORE: Shalane Flanagan looks to future after last Boston Marathon