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Olympic speed skating champion to retire, eyes new sport

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Mo Tae-Bum, the 2010 Olympic 500m champion and 1000m silver medalist, will retire from speed skating and said he is thinking about taking up competitive cycling, according to Yonhap News Agency.

“It’s not going to be an easy challenge,” Mo said, according to the report. “But I’ve entered a few races before.”

Mo, 29, was a surprise medalist at the 2010 Vancouver Games, taking South Korea’s first Olympic title in a sport other than short track speed skating.

He came into those Olympics without a World Cup 500m podium, then beat countrymen and favorites Lee Kang-Seok and Lee Kyou-Hyuk at the Games. He also finished .18 behind Shani Davis in the 1000m.

Mo competed in two more Olympics in Sochi and PyeongChang with a best finish of fourth in the 2014 Olympic 500m. He also won world 500m titles in 2012 and 2013.

Speed skaters often train and compete in cycling. Eric Heiden, who won five speed skating golds at the 1980 Lake Placid Games, took part in the 1986 Tour de France (but didn’t finish). Canadian Clara Hughes earned two Olympic road cycling bronze medals in 1996, then four Olympic speed skating medals between 2002 and 2010.

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MORE: Best speed skating moments from PyeongChang Olympics

USA Track and Field to honor 1968 Olympic team on 50th anniversary

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USA Track and Field begins a campaign this week to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the 1968 Olympic team.

Members of the Mexico City Games team, one of the greatest track and field teams in history, will be honored at high-profile events the remainder of the year.

The campaign, “1968-2018: Celebrating Athletic Achievement and Courage,” culminates with a “Night of Legends” reunion in December at the USATF Annual Meeting in Columbus, Ohio, also attended by current U.S. stars.

The 1968 Olympic team is most remembered for Tommie Smith and John Carlos, who took gold and bronze in the 200m and were sent home after raising their black-gloved fists in a human rights salute during the national anthem.

The team also included gold medalists Bob Beamon (long jump), Dick Fosbury (high jump), Al Oerter (discus), Wyomia Tyus and Jim Hines (100m), Lee Evans (400m), Madeline Manning Mims (800m), Willie Davenport (110m hurdles), Bob Seagren (pole vault), Randy Matson (shot put), Bill Toomey (decathlon) and the men’s and women’s 4x100m and men’s 4x400m.

“The legacy of the greatest track & field team to ever be assembled is still felt 50 years later,” USATF CEO Max Siegel said in a press release. “These Olympians persevered through athletic challenges and social injustices, maintaining their composure and dignity when others may have fallen. It is USATF’s honor to pay homage to their achievements and bring the team together for an epic celebration at our Annual Meeting.”

U.S. track and field athletes will compete at two meets on NBC Sports and NBC Sports Gold this weekend — the Drake Relays and Penn Relays.

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WATCH: NBC Olympics documentary on 1968 Olympics

Paralyzed man walks London Marathon in 36 hours in exoskeleton

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A paralyzed man walked the London Marathon route wearing an exoskeleton suit, finishing around 11 p.m. Monday, nearly 36 hours after he started, according to British media.

Simon Kindleysides was diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumor in April 2013 and was paralyzed from the waist down, he said on the BBC before the race.

“I want to be a role model to my children so they can say their daddy’s been the first paralyzed man to walk the London Marathon ever,” said Kindleysides, a 34-year-old father of three, according to the report.

Kindleysides predicted he would finish in 37 hours, completing the first half of the 26.2-mile race on Sunday, then sleeping a few hours and walking the final 13.1 miles on Monday. Kindleysides said after finishing that he spent 26.5 of those 36 hours walking the marathon.

“Painful, emotional to walk that far in 26.5 hours,” he said. “It feels amazing. So glad I’ve done it. I’m here proving a point, anything is possible.”

Kindleysides said he handcycled from London to Paris for charity two years ago.

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MORE: London Marathon results