Brianna Rollins

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Brianna Rollins, Olympic hurdles champ, banned one year in strange case

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Olympic 100m hurdles champion Brianna Rollins is banned for the entire 2017 track season for what she said was confusion regarding a computer system.

Rollins accepted full responsibility for her mistakes in a statement Thursday. She said the one-year ban, backdated to Dec. 19, was “as a result of my confusion over how the [drug-testing] whereabouts program worked.”

Rollins was not present for three random, out-of-competition drug tests in 2016, which constitutes a two-year ban under anti-doping rules. Rollins had that ban reduced by an arbitration panel to the shortest possible length — one year — given the circumstances and her drug-free record.

Two of the three missed tests came in September, one month after Rollins led a U.S. 100m hurdles sweep in Rio.

Rollins was in her Florida hometown to celebrate “Brianna Rollins Day” on Sept. 13. Two weeks later, she went to visit the White House with the U.S. Olympic team.

Drug testers showed up at Rollins’ Georgia home during both trips, but she wasn’t present as she previously stated that she would be. If Rollins had updated drug testers on her travel to Florida and Washington, D.C., as athletes are required to do, she would have avoided the missed tests.

A three-member arbitration panel stressed that Rollins is a clean athlete, showing “no evidence of avoiding testing, masking drug use, or using drugs.”

Rollins passed all 16 drug tests she took last year, but it’s the three tests that she was not present for that led to her ban.

Under U.S. Anti-Doping Agency rules, elite American athletes must provide a daily one-hour window for random testing, giving a specific location for drug testers to track them down.

If they have a change in plans, they must notify USADA.

Rollins conceded her negligence for the two September missed tests.

She disputed her first missed test from April 27, citing confusion in filling out her whereabouts on a computer program.

Rollins thought she had sufficiently updated her whereabouts for traveling to a meet in Iowa, but she failed to update the system that she would not be at her Georgia home during her daily one-hour window April 27.

A drug tester showed up at her Georgia home that morning, but Rollins was not present.

The three-member panel wrote in a 32-page summary that the computer system and the agencies connected with it “failed to design it to assist the athletes as much as possible to avoid confusion.” The panel also said Rollins still “failed to show a complete absence of negligence.”

“This is a difficult case because it involves the imposition of a serious penalty on a brilliant athlete who is not charged or suspected of using banned substances of any kind,” the panel wrote. “However, while there is much at stake for [Rollins], there is not much in dispute as to the facts or law of this case.”

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MORE: Dawn Harper-Nelson makes tearful plea about banned medication

Team USA women sweep women’s 100 hurdles, Rollins takes gold

AP Photo/Martin Meissner
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Four years after taking silver and bronze in the women’s 100 hurdles, USA Track and Field did even better Wednesday night.

Americans swept the medals, with Brianna Rollins taking gold with a time of 12.48 seconds. Rollins took gold in this event at the 2013 World Championships, and she won the race at the U.S. Olympic Trials in early July as well. While Rollins won gold in comfortable fashion, the race for silver and bronze was much closer.

WATCH: U.S. women sweep 100 meter hurdles

Taking silver was Nia Ali with a time of 12.59 seconds, with Kristi Castlin’s time of 12.61 seconds being good enough for bronze. Castlin beat out Great Britain’s Cindy Ofili by just two one-hundredths of a second. Germany’s Cindy Roleder, who took silver in the 100 hurdles at last year’s World Championships, finished fifth.

Abrahamson: First time ever, U.S. women 1-2-3 in track and field event

The U.S. took silver and bronze in the 100 hurdles in London, and shortly after tonight’s race Lolo Jones sent out a tweet referring to that race. Jones finished fourth in London.

Unlikely hurdles ‘Dream Team’ heads to Rio after more Trials heartbreak

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EUGENE, Ore. — Before the most competitive race of the Olympic Trials, Brianna Rollins envisioned she would be joined in the top three by Kristi Castlin and Nia Ali. Nobody else predicted it, except for maybe Castlin and Ali.

The vision played out in the 100m hurdles final at Hayward Field. Rollins, Castlin and Ali made the Olympic team and shared a group hug after emerging from the deepest pool of talent from one nation in any track and field event.

Though all are Olympic rookies, and Castlin and Ali have little outdoor international acclaim, they are instantly favorites for gold, silver and bronze in Rio, for two reasons.

  • Five Americans combined to clock the 15 fastest 100m hurdles times in the world last year, the kind of grip over one track and field event that no other nation can boast. Though Castlin and Ali were not among that handful, they did beat four of those women in Friday’s final, which ended up being one of the fastest 100m hurdles races of all time.
  • The reigning Olympic and world champions Sally Pearson of Australia and Danielle Williams of Jamaica won’t be in Rio. Pearson tore a hamstring tendon. Williams crashed out of the Jamaican Trials.

The world’s fastest time from a non-American this year — 12.62 seconds — would have tied for sixth in the U.S. Olympic Trials final.

“You can pretty much equate us to like a Dream Team,” Castlin said, not just of the trio at the press conference table but of everyone that qualified for the U.S. final (so strong that Dawn Harper-Nelson, the 2008 Olympic gold medalist and 2012 Olympic silver medalist, was eliminated in the semifinals). “It’s unfortunate that all eight ladies couldn’t go, but again, if we had three different people up here, they could still do a great job [in Rio].”

Rollins won in 12.34 seconds, her fastest time since breaking the American record with a 12.26 at the 2013 U.S. Championships, en route to a world title that year at age 22. She ceded that American record to Keni Harrison on May 28. Though Harrison, one of 11 children, nine adopted, entered the Trials as the favorite, Rollins was arguably her closest pursuer.

Harrison finished sixth in the final and will be one of the best athletes across all Olympic sports who won’t be competing in Rio.

“I don’t worry about my competitors,” Rollins said when a reporter brought up Harrison’s American record of 12.24. “I’m always motivated, no matter what time anyone runs.”

Rollins’ training partner Castlin ran 12.50 on Friday evening, shaving .06 off her personal best from 2012. She made her first global championship team, a day after turning 28 years old. Castlin ranked seventh in the U.S. last year and fifth this year before Trials.

“We saw all those [NBA] games Golden State won, and they got to the championship and couldn’t close it out,” said Castlin, who reportedly left Atlanta in April to join Rollins and coach Lawrence Johnson in California. “It’s just one race. I know a lot of the times, Brianna and I, a lot of races we went to, we didn’t have fresh legs. We were training really hard. Our coach was really preparing us for this moment.”

Then there’s Ali, who has twice won the world indoor 60m hurdles title but had never translated the success outdoors to the longer distance. She missed all of 2015 due to childbirth and ran 12.55, .07 off her personal best, in Friday’s final.

After crossing the finish, Rollins and Castlin hugged before each came to a stop on the wet track. A minute later, Ali joined in. They piggybacked off each other’s answers in a post-race press conference.

“I really would like to acknowledge how much of a great feat and responsibility it is to have a young child and to still be a role model and run on this level,” Castlin said of Ali. “I have so much admiration for that.”

Rollins, Castlin and Ali are all aware of what happened at the 2015 World Championships. Four Americans went to Beijing with a legitimate chance at sweeping places one through four. Rollins ended up the top finisher — in fourth place.

“We really have some big shoes to fill,” Castlin said. “This is our new opportunity to come back.”

The most difficult competition is behind them.

“We can actually breathe now,” Castlin said. “I think all three of us can agree and say we all can breathe a sigh of relief.”

U.S. Track and Field Trials: ResultsDaily Schedule | TV Schedule

The other biggest stories of Trials on Friday were of heartbreak. In addition to Harper-Nelson and Harrison in the 100m hurdles:

Women’s 400m Hurdles: In perhaps the upset of the meet, Shamier Little failed to make the eight-woman final. Though she had the sixth-fastest time overall in the two semifinals, she was fifth-fastest in her heat. Little came into this meet a career 14-0 in races at Hayward Field. She was the reigning world silver medalist and fastest woman in the world this year and turned professional on the eve of her first-round race. Her absence opens the door for 16-year-old Sydney McLaughlin, second-fastest in the semis, to become the youngest U.S. Olympic track and field competitor since 1976.

Men’s Steeplechase: Stanley Kebenei wasn’t the pre-race favorite, but he was in a three-man chase for two Olympic spots going over the final water jump. The Kenyan-born Kebenei splashed and then stumbled, losing all of his momentum and finishing in a distant 13th.

“That was a lifetime chance,” he said later. “I missed that.”

Men’s DiscusSam Mattis, the only American to throw 67 meters in this Olympic cycle and the seventh-ranked man in the world this year, finished ninth. Jared Schuurmans, the 2015 U.S. champion, was seventh. Neither go to Rio.

MORE: LaShawn Merritt returns to 200m, eyes Rio double