Hayley Wickenheiser

Wayne Gretzky compares Hayley Wickenheiser to NHL legend

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The greatest male hockey player of all time paid the greatest female player of all time quite the compliment at her retirement ceremony Saturday.

“You played with heart, desire, finesse, speed, skill,” Wayne Gretzky said to Hayley Wickenheiser. “The only other person, the greatest player to ever live, I think he would be happy if I said you were the female Gordie Howe. Congratulations.”

The Canadian legend Wickenheiser announced her retirement Friday, after six Olympics and four gold medals. On Saturday, she was honored before a Calgary Flames-Edmonton Oilers game. A highlight was a speech by Gretzky, who now works in the Oilers’ front office.

Wickenheiser’s first Olympics, Nagano 1998, marked the only Winter Games for Gretzky. Gretzky played in the first Olympics with NHL participation in Nagano, finishing fourth with Canada, and retired in 1999 without an Olympic medal.

“You’ve opened so many doors for so many young girls to be able to one day win a gold medal,” Gretzky said to Wickenheiser. “To me, that’s more important than anything.”

Wickenheiser then took the mic at center ice and reciprocated.

“A big part of why I play the game is because of this man standing right here, Wayne Gretzky,” she said, later adding, according to Canadian media, “In Salt Lake City [2002] when we won the gold medal, the first two people I saw when we stepped off the ice were Wayne and [former Oilers All-Star defenseman] Kevin [Lowe] standing in our dressing room cheering for us.”

As part of the Wickenheiser ceremony, a tribute video was played including messages from Canadian Olympian and Hall of Famer Mark Messier, NHL commissioner Gary Bettman and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

MORE: Amanda Kessel sets sights on 2018 Olympics

Hayley Wickenheiser ends one of the greatest Olympic careers

Hayley Wickenheiser
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Hayley Wickenheiser, the greatest women’s hockey player in history, ended her decorated career after five Winter Olympics at age 38.

The four-time Olympic champion retired one year before the PyeongChang Winter Games because of “opportunities I couldn’t put off any longer,” including medical school.

Wickenheiser played in her first world championship since the Olympics last season, and had said she wanted to play through 2018, after undergoing left foot surgeries in consecutive years.

“The longer I sat on it, the more I felt it’s the right time,” Wickenheiser said in a Canadian Press interview. “It’s always hard to leave something you love so much behind … and it’s scary to move forward. … Either I rip the Band-Aid off, or you stall on it. It would have been good to go to one more Olympics.”

For the national team, the forward played in 276 games the last 23 years, recording 168 goals and 211 assists, in addition to the five Olympic medals and seven world titles.

Growing up on a Saskatchewan ranch, Wickenheiser caught the Olympic bug watching the 1988 Calgary Games in person, in particular Finnish ski jumper Matti Nykanen.

She would play in the first five Olympic women’s hockey tournaments, starting at age 19 at Nagano 1998. She and teammate Jayna Hefford share the record for most Olympic hockey medals.

Canada lost to the U.S. in the Nagano final but won all of its 20 Olympic hockey games since, including gold-medal finals in Salt Lake City, Torino, Vancouver and Sochi. Wickenheiser was on all of those teams, plus the 2000 Sydney Olympic softball team for Canada, and earned tournament MVP honors in 2002 and 2006.

Wickenheiser also carried the Canadian flag at the Opening Ceremony in Sochi and recited the Athletes’ Oath at the Opening Ceremony in Vancouver and was elected to the International Olympic Committee Athletes’ Commission in 2014.

In 33 years playing hockey, Wickenheiser became known for not only her talent but also her leadership and grit.

She was at the center of the 2002 Olympic flag stomping controversy, thanks to a furious interview after the Canadians stunned the U.S. in the Salt Lake City Winter Games final. USA Hockey and Hockey Canada denied that a stomping incident took place, but Wickenheiser has said in recent years that she believes there was something to the rumor.

Wickenheiser also became the first woman to score a goal in a men’s professional league on Jan. 31, 2003, in Finland’s second division.

In 1998 and 1999, she attended the Philadelphia Flyers rookie training camp.

“Kind of plays like [two-time U.S. Olympian] John LeClair, only I think she’s a little meaner,” Flyers general manager Bobby Clarke said in 1998, according to the Canadian Press.

The number of registered female hockey players in Canada went from 16,000 in her first year on the national team to almost 87,000 now, according to the Canadian Press.

“I’m also most proud of the fact that a little girl in this country, 5 years old, can walk into any rink with a hockey bag and stick and not have to run into the bathroom and hide in the bathroom stall like I used to have to, or be afraid that someone would find out she’s a girl,” Wickenheiser said. “For me, that’s a long ways, because I had to go through a lot when I was a kid.”

MORE: Amanda Kessel sets sights on 2018 Olympics

Hayley Wickenheiser eyes return to Canadian national hockey team

Hayley Wickenheiser
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Hockey icon Hayley Wickenheiser intends to play for the Canadian national team for the first time since the Sochi Olympics in November, again at the 2016 World Championship and perhaps, for a sixth time at the Olympics, in Pyeongchang.

“I’d like to play through 2018,” Wickenheiser said, according to the Canadian Press. “Today, I don’t see any reason why I can’t. Physically I’m fitter than I’ve ever been really, considering my foot and the way I was able to come back and feel pretty healthy and good on the ice.”

Wickenheiser also said three months after the Sochi Olympics that she would “like to go for Pyeongchang.”

Since, she underwent a second left foot surgery in as many years in February and celebrated her 37th birthday in August. Wickenheiser played in Sochi with a broken bone in her left foot.

A doctor told Wickenheiser not to put weight on her foot for four months following this year’s surgery to have a plate and eight screws inserted, according to the Canadian Press.

“It was a pretty serious injury to the point where they said if you put any weight on it you could risk long-term damage,” Wickenheiser said, according to the report. “This is the most serious injury I’ve ever had in my career — a lot of dark days wondering if I’d ever walk normally again. I did everything the surgeon said.”

Wickenheiser is the last active Canadian or American player from the first Olympics with women’s hockey at Nagano 1998, after teammate Jayna Hefford announced her retirement last week.

In Pyeongchang, she could become the first woman to earn a medal in six different Winter Olympics. Wickenheiser also played softball for Canada at the Sydney 2000 Olympics.

Wickenheiser could next represent Canada at the Four Nations Cup in Sweden in November.

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