Nesta Carter

Getty Images

Nesta Carter testifies in relay medal appeal; court sets verdict timing

Leave a comment

LAUSANNE, Switzerland (AP) — Jamaican sprinter Nesta Carter has testified at the Court of Arbitration for Sport to appeal against disqualification from the 2008 Olympics in a doping case that cost Usain Bolt a 4x100m relay gold medal.

Carter shielded his face from media on arriving at sport’s highest court on Wednesday for a closed-doors hearing that ended around seven hours later.

The court said lawyers for Carter and the International Olympic Committee would submit further documents to the judging panel, which was expected to reach a verdict early in 2018.

The 32-year-old Carter is challenging his disqualification imposed by the IOC for a positive test for a banned stimulant.

Carter tested positive for methylhexaneamine last year in a reanalysis program of samples from the 2008 and 2012 Olympics.

The case spoiled Bolt’s perfect Olympic record of three gold medals — in the 100m, 200m and 4x100m — at three consecutive Games from 2008 through 2016.

Carter and Bolt were relay teammates in Beijing, where Jamaica won in a world record of 37.10 seconds. Carter ran the opening leg, and Bolt took the baton third in a team that also included Michael Frater and Asafa Powell.

Carter also teamed with Bolt on three straight world championships relay-winning teams, from 2011 through 2015. They were also teammates when Jamaica set another 4x100m world record at the 2012 London Games, running 36.84.

Dozens of athletes tested positive for banned drugs in an IOC-ordered reanalysis program using new and more accurate tests on samples stored since the 2008 and 2012 Olympics.

The majority of more than 110 cases involved steroids and athletes from the former Soviet republics. Carter’s case was the only one involving Jamaica.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Michael Johnson: My advice to Usain Bolt was to retire after Rio

Appeal set for Usain Bolt relay teammate’s doping case

AP
Leave a comment

Nesta Carter, whose 2008 doping case caused Usain Bolt to be stripped of an Olympic gold medal in January, will have his appeal against that disqualification heard Nov. 15.

The case — Carter v. the International Olympic Committee — is set for the Court of Arbitration for Sport.

On Jan. 25, it was announced that the Jamaican sprinter was retroactively disqualified from the Beijing Games after retests of his 2008 doping samples came back positive for the banned stimulant methylhexaneamine.

In accordance with doping rules, that meant the entire Jamaican 2008 Olympic 4x100m team was stripped of its medals, since Carter was part of the quartet. It brought Bolt’s Olympic gold-medal tally down from nine to eight, one shy of the track and field record shared by Carl Lewis and Paavo Nurmi.

The stimulant methylhexaneamine was not named on the World Anti-Doping Agency’s banned substances list in 2008 (it is now), but, according to the IOC:

Methylhexaneamine fell within the scope of the general prohibition of stimulants having a similar chemical structure or similar biological effect as the listed stimulants. Under the then applicable system, stimulants which were not expressly listed, were presumed to be Non-Specified Prohibited Substances.

The Court of Arbitration for Sport (“CAS”) has confirmed that the presence or use of substances falling within the scope of generic definitions of the Prohibited List, can be used as a basis of establishing anti-doping rules violations.

In June 2016, “Carter alleged that he had never ingested or taken a substance known as or containing methylhexaneamine,” and later claimed that a retest of a 2008 sample in 2016 was “unduly late,” according to the IOC. The IOC can order to retest samples for up to 10 years after an Olympics, upped from eight years in 2015.

Bolt said in February that if he was stripped of the gold medal before the Rio Games, he might have considered continuing his career through Tokyo 2020 rather than retire in 2017.

“Even if I lose all my relay gold medals, for me, I did what I had to do, my personal goals,” Bolt said. “That’s what counts.”

Carter’s attorney said he first appealed the ruling to the Court of Arbitration for Sport in February.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Bolt: My world records will stand for 15-20 years

Usain Bolt separated from top challengers at final Jamaican meet

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Usain Bolt will race against almost all of his top Jamaican rivals at his final meet on home soil on Saturday. Except for his closest competitor and training partner, plus arguably the most impressive sprinter this year.

The Racers Grand Prix provisional start lists have Bolt in a 100m heat with fellow Jamaican Olympians Asafa PowellNesta CarterMichael Frater and Nickel Ashmeade.

It will mark Carter’s first race with Bolt since Bolt and the Jamaican 2008 Olympic 4x100m relay team had to return their gold medals due to Carter’s positive retest of a doping sample from the Beijing Games.

Yohan Blake, who took silver behind training partner Bolt in the 2012 Olympic 100m and 200m, is in a different 100m heat than Bolt on Saturday night. Blake’s heat also includes South African Akani Simbine, who has broken 10 seconds a total of six times already this year.

Blake and Simbine finished fourth and fifth in the Rio Olympic 100m won by Bolt. They are the only Rio Olympic 100m finalists at the Racers Grand Prix after American Trayvon Bromell withdrew.

Bromell hasn’t raced since the Rio Olympics after undergoing Achilles surgery but is planning to compete at the U.S. Championships in two weeks, his agent said Tuesday.

Bolt has four meets left before retirement — Racers, Ostrava on June 28, Monaco on July 21 and the world championships in London in August.

Bolt hasn’t lost an individual race in four years.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Rival not convinced Bolt will retire this summer