Usain Bolt

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Appeal set for Usain Bolt relay teammate’s doping case

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Nesta Carter, whose 2008 doping case caused Usain Bolt to be stripped of an Olympic gold medal in January, will have his appeal against that disqualification heard Nov. 15.

The case — Carter v. the International Olympic Committee — is set for the Court of Arbitration for Sport.

On Jan. 25, it was announced that the Jamaican sprinter was retroactively disqualified from the Beijing Games after retests of his 2008 doping samples came back positive for the banned stimulant methylhexaneamine.

In accordance with doping rules, that meant the entire Jamaican 2008 Olympic 4x100m team was stripped of its medals, since Carter was part of the quartet. It brought Bolt’s Olympic gold-medal tally down from nine to eight, one shy of the track and field record shared by Carl Lewis and Paavo Nurmi.

The stimulant methylhexaneamine was not named on the World Anti-Doping Agency’s banned substances list in 2008 (it is now), but, according to the IOC:

Methylhexaneamine fell within the scope of the general prohibition of stimulants having a similar chemical structure or similar biological effect as the listed stimulants. Under the then applicable system, stimulants which were not expressly listed, were presumed to be Non-Specified Prohibited Substances.

The Court of Arbitration for Sport (“CAS”) has confirmed that the presence or use of substances falling within the scope of generic definitions of the Prohibited List, can be used as a basis of establishing anti-doping rules violations.

In June 2016, “Carter alleged that he had never ingested or taken a substance known as or containing methylhexaneamine,” and later claimed that a retest of a 2008 sample in 2016 was “unduly late,” according to the IOC. The IOC can order to retest samples for up to 10 years after an Olympics, upped from eight years in 2015.

Bolt said in February that if he was stripped of the gold medal before the Rio Games, he might have considered continuing his career through Tokyo 2020 rather than retire in 2017.

“Even if I lose all my relay gold medals, for me, I did what I had to do, my personal goals,” Bolt said. “That’s what counts.”

Carter’s attorney said he first appealed the ruling to the Court of Arbitration for Sport in February.

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MORE: Bolt: My world records will stand for 15-20 years

Usain Bolt has ‘a lot of offers’ from soccer teams

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A torn hamstring will apparently not keep Usain Bolt from his long-talked-about pursuit of soccer.

“We have a lot of offers from different teams, but I have to get over my injury first and then take it from there,” Bolt said while in Sydney this week, according to the Daily Telegraph in Australia.

What those offers entail, and who extended them, are not clear.

Separately, Bolt spoke with former longtime Manchester United manager Alex Ferguson while attending a United-Leicester City match on Aug. 26.

“I said, if I get fit, will you give me a trial, and he said give me a call and we’ll see what happens,” Bolt said, according to Australia’s 9 News. “So, we’ll see how that works out.”

Bolt has been linked to possibly practicing with his favorite Premier League club or playing in a United exhibition-type match for years.

Bolt also said last year that he expected to train with German club Borussia Dortmund soon after his retirement from track and field after last month’s world championships. Bolt and Dortmund already have a tie-in with apparel sponsor Puma.

“I wouldn’t say I’m the most skilled football player, but I notice that it doesn’t take a lot of skills nowadays,” Bolt said, according to 9 News. “I think I’ll have to learn a lot more passing and control and seeing the game at a different level, but I play a lot of football with my friends, and I think I’m pretty good.”

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MORE: Bolt says his records will stand for 15-20 years

Usain Bolt says his world records will stand for 15-20 years

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KYOTO, Japan (AP) — Usain Bolt is feeling no pressure in retirement, confident his best times can remain world records for decades.

The only sprinter to capture the 100- and 200-meter track titles at three consecutive Olympics, Bolt retired last month after the world championships in London. He holds the world record of 9.58 seconds in the 100 and 19.19 in the 200 – both set in Berlin in 2009.

“I think (they’re) going to last a while,” Bolt said during a promotional event in Japan on Tuesday. “I think our era with Yohan Blake, Justin Gatlin and Asafa Powell and all these guys was the best era of athletes. If it was going to be broken, it would have been broken in this era, so I think I have at least 15 to 20 more years.”

Bolt’s farewell major meet didn’t go to plan in London. After a surprising third-place finish in the 100 behind Americans Gatlin and Christian Coleman, Bolt’s last race ended in the anguish of an injured hamstring while anchoring Jamaica’s 4×100-meter relay team.

Gatlin, often cast as the villain during Bolt’s long dominance, said he thinks his rival will be back. But Bolt brushed off that notion.

“I have nothing to prove, that’s the main reason I left track and field. After you do everything you want there is no reason to stick around,” Bolt said.

Bolt was the life of the party every time he competed, captivating fans with his charisma and smile.

As for the next biggest star in track, Bolt said he doesn’t see anyone at the moment who he expects will follow in his footsteps.

“It’s hard for me to pick someone,” Bolt said. “I think what made me stand out was not only the fast times that I ran but my personality that people really enjoyed and loved.

“If you want to be a star in sports and take over a sport you have to let people know who you are as a person, not just as a track athlete.”

Jamaica won only one gold medal at this year’s worlds, a disappointing haul given its success in the last decade. Bolt said his country’s young athletes will have to step up now that he’s gone.

“The biggest thing with Jamaica now is if the youngsters want it,” Bolt said. “Over the years, one thing I’ve learned is you have to want to be great. If you don’t want to be great, it won’t happen.”

Of course, wanting to be great and doing what it takes to make it happen are two different things, too.

“I’ve noticed a lot of the young athletes, as soon as they get their first contract and start making money, they really just don’t care as much anymore,” Bolt said. “A lot of them are satisfied with getting their first contract, going out and making their first team. If they are satisfied with that, then we’re in trouble.

“Hopefully, a few of these young guys are going to be hungry and want to be great and if we get those guys we will be OK but so far, it is not looking good.”

The 31-year-old Bolt said he had good people around him from his earliest successes who were also there at the end, helping him make the most of his talent.

“My first two Olympics were easier, I was confident, I was young, I was enjoying the sport,” he said. “But I think my last three years were the toughest years for me because then I had done so much I found myself thinking ‘Why am I still doing this? I’ve accomplished everything. I don’t really need to prove anything else.’ But the team that I had around me really helped me to push myself to set the bar so high.”

As for the future, Bolt says he is interested in playing soccer and possibly settling down and getting married.

“Something I’ve always wanted to do is play football,” said Bolt, a die-hard Manchester United supporter. “My team is working on that but we haven’t confirmed anything yet!”

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MORE:  Yohan Blake wins the 100 at the Van Damme Memorial