Julia Fincher

Andre De Grasse wins 100m with wind-aided time of 9.69 at Stockholm Diamond League

Leave a comment

With the help of winds blowing 4.8 meters per second, 22-year-old Canadian sprinter Andre De Grasse finished first in the 100m race at the Stockholm Diamond League.

His winning time of 9.69 seconds would have broken the current Canadian record of 9.84 if the winds had not been well over the legal limit of 2.0.

De Grasse won a silver in the 200m and bronzes in the 100m and 4×100 relay at the 2016 Rio Olympics. His 100m time in Rio, which saw him finish behind Jamaica’s Usain Bolt and the U.S.’ Justin Gatlin, was a personal best of 9.91.

But his season’s best time was 10.01, which he clocked four days ago when he won the 100m at the Oslo Diamond League.

De Grasse hadn’t broken the 10-second mark since the Olympic race. He told the IAAF after his win in Stockholm, “Coming into today, I just wanted to run sub-10. When saw that time, I was in shock.”

Coming in second were the Ivory Coast’s Ben Youssef Meite and Jamaica’s Ryan Shields with times of 9.84 and 9.89, respectively. Five of the eight men in the final ran times under 10 seconds.

The next Diamond League meet will take place in Paris on July 1.

READ MORE: Gabriele Grunewald accepted into U.S. Champs, racing amid chemotherapy

 

 

U.S. short track skater Chris Creveling receives four-year doping ban

Getty Images
Leave a comment

After testing positive for a prohibited substance, Olympic silver medalist Chris Creveling has been banned from competition for four years and will miss the 2018 PyeongChang Olympics.

On Oct. 18, 2016, an out-of-competition urine test showed clomiphene in Creveling’s system. The drug is classified by the US Anti-Doping Agency as performance-enhancing for its effect on testosterone levels. It’s most commonly taken by women who don’t ovulate to treat infertility.

His four-year ban is effective from Nov. 18, 2016, when Creveling, 30, accepted a provisional suspension.

Creveling and the U.S. men, including J.R. Celski, won a silver medal in the 5000m relay at the 2014 Sochi Olympics. It was the lone medal won by either the U.S. short track or speed skating teams in Sochi.

READ MORE: PyeongChang urges NHL to reconsider its position on Olympics

With new president on board, Paris 2024 bid is ‘ready right now’

Paris 2024
2 Comments

PARIS (AP) Paris bid leaders want to capitalize on the sense of optimism surrounding new President Emmanuel Macron to beat Los Angeles and secure the Olympic Games in 2024 , not 2028.

With the IOC currently assessing a proposal to award the next two Olympics – one to each city – Paris officials insist the French capital city is the right choice for 2024.

The 39-year-old Macron, France’s youngest-ever president, officially took office on Sunday as the IOC evaluation commission started a three-day visit to Paris.

“Our team has a new member, the new President of France, Emmanuel Macron,” bid leader Tony Estanguet said on Sunday. “He’s been a fantastic supporter of our bid from the beginning. He will be with us all the way to Lima and hopefully beyond.”

Los Angeles and Paris are the only two bidders left for the 2024 Games, which will be awarded in September at a meeting of Olympic leaders in Peru. The race began with five cities, but Rome, Hamburg, Germany, and Budapest, Hungary, all pulled out.

The IOC has four vice presidents looking into the prospect of awarding the 2024 and 2028 Games at the same time in September.

“We have one goal during these few days: to convince you that Paris is the right city, with the right vision, at the right moment,” Paris mayor Anne Hidalgo said. “The right city with world-class venues and accommodation, and the best public transport in the world, ready right now.”

International Olympic Committee members were in Los Angeles earlier this week to meet with the U.S. bid leaders and inspect their planned venues. While Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti appeared at least willing to consider hosting the 2028 Olympics if the city isn’t awarded its first choice of 2024, Hidalgo said Paris is set for the earlier edition.

“With financial and political stability and support, we are ready right now,” Hidalgo said. “At the right moment, as the no risk option.”

The French government has pledged one billion euros ($1.1 billion) of support for the Paris bid and Macron is expected to confirm that amount. If Paris is awarded the 2024 Games, the infrastructure budget is expected to total 3 billion euros, with operational costs of 3.2 billion euros.

Paris also plans to underline the compactness of its plans to make the difference. According to the bid dossier, 84 percent of the athletes will be able to reach their competition venues in less than 25 minutes, and more than 70 percent of the proposed venues are existing facilities, with a further 25 percent relying on temporary structures.

Paris, which last staged the Olympics in 1924, failed in bids for the 1992, 2008, and 2012 Games.

With the pro-business and pro-EU Macron, Paris bid leaders have a strong supporter. The new president has already thrown his weight behind Paris’ bid, telling IOC President Thomas Bach over the phone of its “expected benefits for all French people.”

Macron won’t attend Sunday’s night gala dinner with IOC members in Paris but is expected to meet with the evaluation commission on Tuesday before they leave.

IOC members started their visit with discussions on Paris’ proposals that will be followed by venue visits on Monday and further meetings on the final day.

READ MORE: LA mayor opens door slightly to 2028 Games if 2024 is no go