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Julia Fincher

Elaine Thompson wins 17th straight 100m race at Diamond League Rabat

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Elaine Thompson extended her winning streak to 17 consecutive 100m victories by winning Sunday’s Diamond League meet in Rabat, Morocco, with a time of 10:87 seconds. The reigning Olympic champion in the 100m and 200m posted a meet record time to outrun Marie-Josee Ta Lou of Côte d’Ivoire and Michelle-Lee Ahye of Trinidad and Tobago, who finished second and third respectively.

The lone American in the field, Aaliyah Brown, crossed the finish line in eighth place.

Other notable results:

Women’s 400m

Bahamian Shaunae Miller-Uibo, the Rio Olympic champion in the 400m, ran 49.80 to win the women’s 400m race. Other competitors included South African Caster Semenya, who won Olympic gold in the 800m in Rio.

It was the first time in recent history, and perhaps ever, that the reigning 400m and 800m Olympic champions raced against each other in an individual race. Semenya faltered in Rabat, however, finishing seventh with a time of 51.53 seconds.

They won’t face off again at next month’s world championships; Miller-Uibo is planning to run the 200m and 400m, while Semenya will contest only the 800m.

Miller-Uibo has now won the 400m at 10 straight meets since losing to Allyson Felix at the 2015 World Championships. Felix, who did not race in Rabat, is ranked No. 1 in the 400m this year.

Coming in behind Miller-Uibo in Rabat were two U.S. sprinters: Natasha Hastings was second with 50.86 seconds and U.S. 400m national champion Quanera Hayes was third with 51.08.

Men’s 200m

Canadian Andre de Grasse ran 20.03 seconds to win the event. The sprinter, whose three medals from the Rio Olympics includes a 200m silver behind Usain Bolt, swept both the 100m and 200m at last week’s Canadian Championships.

Finishing second was U.S. 200m champion Ameer Webb with a time of 20.18. Third with a time of 20.22 was Great Britain’s Zharnel Hughes, a longtime training partner of Bolt.

Men’s 800m

Winner Nijel Amos of Botswana continued his comeback in Rabat. The 2012 Olympic silver medalist in the 800m failed to make the final at the 2015 Worlds and 2016 Olympics, but posted the fasted 800m time in the world this year, 1:43.18 seconds, a week ago in London.

He took 800m gold in Rabat with a time of 1:43.91. Finishing second and third were Kenya’s Kipyegon Bett, just 19 years old, and Donavan Brazier, the 800m U.S. champion.

Men’s long jump

The U.S.’ Jarrion Lawson posted a season’s best distance of 8.33m, but finished second by just 2cm behind South Africa’s Ruswahl Samaai.

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Chris Froome holds on to yellow jersey after Tour de France Stage 15

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LE PUY-EN-VELAY, France (AP) — Chris Froome fought back from a bike breakdown to cling onto his race leader’s yellow jersey on the tricky Stage 15 of the Tour de France, won Sunday with a courageous solo breakaway by Bauke Mollema of the Netherlands.

The back wheel of three-time Tour champion Froome broke at the worst possible time, just as the AG2R team of close rival Romain Bardet was picking up the pace ahead of the last big climb of the day, an 8.3-kilometer (5-mile) slog up the steep Col de Peyra Taillade — scaled for the very first time by the Tour.

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By the time Froome had stopped, taken a wheel off his teammate Michal Kwiatkowski and got going again, Bardet’s group was already way ahead — about one minute ahead of him down the road.

Aside from Bardet, other top riders were also in that group, including Fabio Aru and Rigoberto Uran — all within 30 seconds of Froome in the overall standings. Froome had two choices: catch them or lose the overall race lead and the famed yellow jersey that goes with it.

He hared after them and, helped first by teammates Mikel Nieve and then by Mikel Landa, Froome worked furiously on the climb to reel in Bardet’s group — past cheering crowds with some people who booed him as he labored past them.

“It was a stressful moment,” Froome said. “I thought I might not get back to the front.”

By recovering from the mishap, Froome now takes the jersey and an 18-second overall lead into Monday’s rest day, the last of two at the 104th Tour, ahead of a crucial last week of racing in the Alps and with a time trial in Marseille.

Mollema, a top-10 finisher at the Tours of 2013, 2014 and 2015, sped away on the descent from the Peyra Taillade climb and worked like a coal miner over the last 30 kilometers (20 miles) to stay out in front of a group of four riders who laid chase.

They couldn’t catch the Trek-Segafredo rider.

Mollema held his arms out in a cross shape as he sped across the finish line in Le Puy-en-Velay, the start of a famed Christian pilgrimage route to Spain.

NBC Sports Gold coverage of Stage 16 starts Tuesday at 7:25 a.m. ET, with NBCSN coming on air at 7:30.

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Roger Federer beats Marin Cilic to win 8th Wimbledon title in lopsided final

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LONDON (AP) — Roger Federer’s wait for No. 8 at Wimbledon is over.

He is once again the champion of the grass-court Grand Slam tournament, now more often than any other man in the history of an event first held in 1877.

Federer won his eighth title at the All England Club and 19th major trophy overall, capping a marvelous fortnight in which he never dropped a set by overwhelming Marin Cilic 6-3, 6-1, 6-4 on Sunday in a lopsided final that was more coronation than contest.

When it ended, with an ace from Federer after merely 1 hour, 41 minutes, he raised both arms overhead. A minute or so later, he was sitting on the sideline, wiping tears from his eyes.

Truly, the outcome was only in doubt for about 20 minutes, the amount of time it took Federer to grab his first lead. Cilic, whose left foot was treated by a trainer in the late going, was never able to summon the intimidating serves or crisp volleys that carried him to his lone Grand Slam title at the 2014 U.S. Open, where he surprisingly beat Federer in straight sets in the semifinals.

This one was all Federer, who last won Wimbledon in 2012.

That seventh championship pulled Federer even with Pete Sampras and William Renshaw in what’s still officially called Gentlemen’s Singles. Sampras won all but one of his in the 1990s; Renshaw won each of his in the 1880s, back in the days when the previous year’s champion advanced automatically to the final and therefore was able to successfully defend a title with one victory.

Federer had come close to bettering his predecessors but couldn’t quite do it. He lost in the 2014 and 2015 Wimbledon finals to Novak Djokovic, and in the semifinals last year after erasing match points to get past Cilic in a five-set quarterfinal.

With clouds overhead and a bit of chill in the air, the very first game offered a glimpse at Cilic’s apparent plan: go after Federer’s backhand. All five points won by Cilic in that opening stanza came via mistakes by Federer on that stroke. Conversely, all three points won by Federer in that game were thanks to forehand miscues by Cilic.

Understandably, there were signs of nerves for both.

Federer’s early play, in general, was symptomatic of jitters. For everything he’s accomplished, for all of the bright lights and big settings to which he’s become accustomed, the guy many have labeled the “GOAT” — Greatest of All Time — admits to feeling heavy legs and jumbled thoughts at important on-court moments to this day.

And so it was that Federer, not Cilic, hit a double-fault in each of his first two service games. And it was Federer, not Cilic, who faced the match’s initial break point, 15 minutes in, trailing 2-1 and 30-40. But Cilic netted a return there, beginning a run of 17 points in a row won by Federer on his serve.

It was as if the first indication of the slightest bit of trouble jolted Federer.

In the very next game, Federer broke to lead 3-2 with the help of three errors by Cilic and one marvelous point. Cilic tried a drop shot, Federer got to it and replied at a tight angle. Cilic got that and offered a slick response of his own but slipped and fell to the court, allowing Federer to flip a winner, eliciting roars from the crowd.

Federer broke again to take that set when Cilic double-faulted, walked to the changeover and slammed his racket on his sideline chair. Cilic then sat and covered his head with a white towel.

After Federer raced to a 3-0 lead in the second set, Cilic cried while he was visited by a doctor and trainer. At that moment, it wasn’t clear, exactly, what might have been ailing Cilic. During a later medical timeout, Cilic’s left foot was re-taped by the trainer.

Federer would break to a 4-3 edge in the third set and all that remained to find out was how he’d finish. It was with his eighth ace, at 114 mph, and he raised both arms overhead.

This caps a remarkable reboot for Federer, who departed Wimbledon a year ago with a lot of doubts. He had lost in the semifinals, yes, but more troublesome was that his body was letting him down for the first time in his career.

Earlier in 2016, he had surgery on his left knee, then sat out the French Open because of a bad back, ending a record streak of participating in 65 consecutive Grand Slam tournaments. Then, after Wimbledon, he did not play at all the rest of the year, skipping the Rio Olympics, the U.S. Open and everything else in an attempt to let his knee fully heal.

It worked. Did it ever.

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