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Runner DQed for carrying injured teammate to finish line (video)

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An incredible act of sportsmanship took place at the Utah Class 6A state cross-country meet on Wednesday.

Blake Lewis, a junior at Riverton High School, broke his left tibia with about 200 meters left in the three-mile race, according to Fox’s affiliate in Salt Lake City.

“[At] like 300 [meters], it started really hurting,” Lewis told the Fox affiliate. “Then, like, 200, I just heard my bone snap. It was excruciating.”

Lewis’ mom heard it.

“I thought he stepped on a branch,” she told the news station. “I have never actually heard him scream like that.”

Riverton senior Sean Rausch saw a hobbled Lewis, picked up his teammate, and carried him on his back toward the finish.

“He was screaming the whole way, but I kept telling him we’re a family, we’re a team, and we’re all in this together,” Rausch said.

Rausch put Lewis down just before the line, allowing Lewis to hop on one leg over it in front of him. They finished 111th and 112th out of the 122-runner field, according to RunnerSpace.com results.

Both runners were disqualified per a rule outlawing assisting runners during a race, the Utah High School Activities Association said Friday.

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VIDEO: Warsaw Marathon leader collapses with finish line in sight

Michael Phelps: I could come back, if I wanted to (video)

Michael Phelps
TODAY
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Michael Phelps is fit enough that he could come out of retirement. He just has no desire to.

“I feel like I could do it, but I just have nothing that I want to come back and do,” Phelps said on TODAY on Thursday while promoting Colgate’s #everydropcounts water-saving campaign. “I think that’s the biggest thing. For me, it’s now watching some of these kids coming up. Watch somebody like Caeleb [Dressel] and continue to watch Katie [Ledecky]. Who knows who’s going to shine in the next Olympics.”

Phelps said he’s working out more seriously now. The 32-year-old has lost 12 to 15 pounds from his heaviest point since retiring after winning six more medals (five gold) at the Rio Games.

“I wanted to get back into some kind of shape, and then I kind of started lifting,” Phelps said. “The biggest thing is just knowing that for me to be the best husband, the best dad, the hardest worker, I need to work out. It’s something that I have to do at least five or six times per week.”

For those still hoping, Phelps did say in July there was a one or two percent chance he would come back, according to Entertainment Weekly.

“Very minimal,” Phelps said after a laugh then, according to the magazine. “I wanted to retire on my own terms and never have a what-if, and I’m to that point where I’m very content with everything that’s going on.”

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VIDEO: Michael Phelps shares being bullied, depressed in film

McKayla Maroney alleges sexual abuse by team doctor

McKayla Maroney
USA Today Sports
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Two-time Olympic medalist McKayla Maroney says she was molested for years by a former USA Gymnastics team doctor, abuse she said started in her early teens and continued for the rest of her competitive career.

Maroney posted a lengthy statement on Twitter early Wednesday that detailed the allegations of abuse against Dr. Larry Nassar, who spent three decades working with athletes at USA Gymnastics but now is in jail in Michigan awaiting sentencing after pleading guilty to possession of child pornography.

Nassar has pleaded not guilty to the assault charges, and the dozens of civil suits filed in Michigan are currently in mediation.

Maroney, now 21, says the abuse began while attending a U.S. National team training camp at the Karoyli Ranch in the Sam Houston Forest north of Houston, Texas.

Maroney was 13 at the time and wrote Nassar told her she was receiving “medically necessary treatment he had been performing on patients for over 30 years.” Maroney did not detail Nassar’s specific actions.

Maroney, who won a team gold and an individual silver on vault at the 2012 Olympics in London, said Nassar continued to give her “treatment” throughout her career.

She described Nassar giving her a sleeping pill while the team traveled to Japan for the 2011 World Championships.

Maroney says Nassar later visited her in her hotel room after the team arrived in Tokyo, where he molested her yet again.

“I thought I was going to die that night,” Maroney wrote.

Maroney did not immediately return an interview request. Attorneys for Nassar had no comment. USA Gymnastics also had no immediate comment.

Maroney says she decided to come forward as part of the #MeToo movement on social media that arose in the wake of allegations of sexual misconduct against Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein.

“This is happening everywhere,” Maroney wrote. “Wherever there is a position of power, there is the potential for abuse. I had a dream to go to the Olympics, and the things I had to endure to get there, were unnecessary and disgusting.”

Maroney called for change, urging other victims to speak out and demanding organizations “be held accountable for their inappropriate actions and behavior.”

Maroney is the highest-profile gymnast yet to come forward claiming she was abused by Nassar.

Jamie Dantzscher, a 2000 U.S. Olympic bronze medalist, was part of the initial wave of lawsuits filed against Nassar in 2016.

Aly Raisman, who won six medals as the captain of the U.S. Olympic women’s team in 2012 and 2016, called for sweeping change at USA Gymnastics in August.

USA Gymnastics launched an independent review of its policies in the wake of the allegations against Nassar in the summer of 2016 following reporting by the Indianapolis Star that highlighted chronic mishandling of abuse allegations against coaches and staff at some of its more than 3,500 clubs across the country.

In June, the federation immediately adopted 70 recommendations proffered by Deborah Daniels, a former federal prosecutor who oversaw the review.

The new guidelines require member gyms to go to authorities immediately, with Daniels suggesting USA Gymnastics consider withholding membership from clubs that decline to do so.

The organization also named Toby Stark, a child welfare advocate, as its director of SafeSport.

Part of Stark’s mandate is educating members on rules, educational programs, reporting and adjudication services.

USA Gymnastics had initially agreed to purchase the training facility at the Karolyi Ranch following longtime national team coordinator Martha Karolyi’s retirement shortly after the 2016 Olympics ended.

The organization has since opted out of that agreement. The organization also fired president Steve Penny in March. A replacement has not been named.

Maroney, who lives in California and officially retired in 2015, encouraged others to speak out.

“Our silence has given the wrong people power for too long,” she wrote, “and it’s time to take our power back.”