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World championships rematches in Birmingham; Diamond League preview

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Several newly crowned world champions headline a Diamond League meet in Birmingham, Great Britain, on Sunday, live on NBC Sports Gold and The Olympic Channel: Home of Team USA.

Coverage begins on NBC Sports Gold at 8:20 a.m. ET and on the Olympic Channel at 10 a.m.

Many stars made the 125-mile trek northwest from London, where worlds concluded last Sunday, to Birmingham for the last Diamond League meet before the finals in Zurich (Aug. 24) and Brussels (Sept. 1).

They include Allyson FelixMo FarahElaine Thompson and Shaunae Miller-Uibo, plus surprise world champs Emma CoburnPhyllis Francis and Ramil Guliyev.

Here are the Birmingham entry lists. Here’s the schedule of events (all times Eastern):

8:22 a.m. — Women’s Pole Vault
8:31 a.m. — Men’s Long Jump
8:41 a.m. — Women’s 800m
9:30 a.m. — Men’s Mile
9:39 a.m. — Men’s High Jump
9:47 a.m. — Women’s Discus
10:03 a.m. — Women’s 400m Hurdles
10:14 a.m. — Men’s 800m
10:23 a.m. — Men’s 100m
10:28 a.m. — Women’s Triple Jump
10:32 a.m. — Men’s 400m
10:40 a.m. — Women’s 3000m
10:53 a.m. — Men’s Shot Put
10:57 a.m. — Men’s 110m Hurdles
11:08 a.m. — Women’s 100m
11:17 a.m. — Men’s 200m
11:26 a.m. — Women’s 1500m
11:36 a.m. — Women’s 400m
11:45 a.m. — Men’s 3000m

Here are five events to watch:

Women’s 3000m — 10:40 a.m.
Emma Coburn and Courtney Frerichs, the surprise one-two finishers in the world championships 3000m steeplechase, race without the barriers and water jumps here. The two fastest American steeplers of all time face the two fastest Americans in the 5000m all time — Shannon Rowbury and Molly Huddle.

But the favorite has to be Kenyan Hellen Obiri, who is the fastest woman since 1993 in this non-Olympic event. Obiri dusted 10,000m world-record holder Almaz Ayana with her kick to win the world 5000m crown on Sunday.

Men’s Shot Put — 10:53 a.m.
Ten of the top 11 finishers from worlds are here, including the medalists — Tomas Walsh (NZL), Joe Kovacs (USA) and Stipe Žunić (CRO).

Nobody has been more impressive this season than Olympic champion Ryan Crouser, who will look to make up for his shocking sixth-place finish from London. Crouser owns five of the world’s top six throws in 2017, including a 22.65-meter heave at the USATF Outdoor Championships. That’s two feet farther than Walsh’s world title-winning throw.

Women’s 100m — 11:08 a.m.
An interesting field will race in two heats to qualify for this final. It does not include Tori Bowie, who in London became the first American woman to take a global 100m crown since 2005.

But it does include Olympic 100m champion Elaine Thompson, who earned zero medals at worlds while reportedly slowed by a stomach illness and an Achilles problem. World 100m silver and bronze medalists Marie-Josée Ta Lou and Dafne Schippers are also in the field.

Two Olympic champions making their Diamond League 100m debuts are Sally Pearson, the 2012 Olympic 100m hurdles gold medalist, and Rio 400m champion Shaunae Miller-Uibo.

Men’s 200m — 11:17 a.m.
Who would have thought six months ago that a Diamond League 200m without Usain BoltAndre De GrasseWayde van Niekerk or Justin Gatlin would be one of the headline events?

After the surprise at worlds, this one is intriguing. Turkey’s Ramil Guliyev is entered after winning an out-of-nowhere gold medal in London. He’ll face a man with reason to carry a chip on his shoulder — Botswana’s Isaac Makwala. Makwala has the fastest 200m time in the world this year but finished sixth at worlds, likely in part due to his medical controversy and having to run an extra 200m heat alone the night before the final.

Women’s 400m — 11:36 a.m.
The three world medalists return here, hopefully to race in better weather conditions. American Phyllis Francis surpassed Allyson Felix and a stumbling Miller-Uibo to claim gold on a wet, chilly night in London last week in the slowest world championships-winning time ever. Bahrain’s Salwa Eid Naser clipped Felix for silver, with Miller-Uibo falling to fourth.

Felix still owns the fastest time in the world this year and, with Miller-Uibo choosing to race the 100m in Birmingham, is a quarter of a second faster than anyone in this field in 2017.

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VIDEO: Ten memorable races from worlds

Mo Farah honors Ali after Birmingham win; track and field’s longest streak ends

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BIRMINGHAM, England (AP) — With the Rio Olympics two months away, another gold medal looks like a long shot for Sally Pearson.

Up-and-coming American Keni Harrison couldn’t be more ready.

In a loaded field for the women’s 100m hurdles at the Diamond League event in Birmingham on Sunday, Pearson trailed home in seventh place in her first competitive race in a year following a serious wrist injury. The Australian described her time of 13.25 seconds — almost a second slower than her personal best — as “disgusting” but was “really happy I could cross the finish line with a smile on my face.”

Harrison won the race in 12.46 seconds despite hitting some hurdles along the way, showing her stunning victory in Eugene last week — in 12.24, the second-fastest time ever — was no one-off. She beat compatriot Brianna Rollins (12.57) in an American 1-2-3-4.

At age 23 and in her first full season as a professional, Harrison is one of the United States’ best track talents heading into Rio, coming within 0.03 seconds of the long-standing world record last week.

“To be doing as well as I am, I’m just really blessed,” Harrison said.

Pearson hadn’t raced since suffering what doctors said was a “bone explosion” in her wrist in a heavy fall in Rome, a year and a day ago. She was also running with strapping around her left hamstring to protect an ailment.

“I’m actually really excited, which I wouldn’t normally be because all I’d be looking at would be the result,” Pearson said.

Full Birmingham results are here.

Home favorite Mo Farah got the biggest cheer of the day after breaking the British record to win the 3000m in 7 minutes, 32.62 seconds. Farah, who now holds his country’s best times from 1500m through 10,000m, bookended his performance with some shadow boxing in honor of his sporting hero Muhammad Ali, the boxing great who died Saturday at age 74.

The longest winning streak in track and field ended. Colombian Caterine Ibargüen was beaten in the triple jump by Kazakh Olga Rypakova. The former had won 34 straight competitions since taking silver at the London Olympics.

Among the other winners at the Alexander Stadium on a sunny day in central England were Olympic champion Kirani James, who ran the 400m in 44.23 — one of six meet records on the day, according to organizers. Kim Collins, the 40-year-old sprinter, clocked 10.11 to win a men’s 100m field lacking the top names, and Kenya’s Asbel Kiprop won the men’s 1500m in a world-leading 3.29.35.

David Rudisha, the Olympic 800m champion from Kenya, won the rarely run 600m in 1.13.10.

Olympic long-jump champion Greg Rutherford‘s year-long unbeaten record ended when he finished fifth, behind Buffalo Bills wide receiver Marquise Goodwin (8.42 meters).

Rutherford tweeted that he was struggling with “bad whiplash” after hurting his neck in winning in Rome midweek.

Canadian Andre De Grasse won the 200m in 20.16 seconds into a headwind against a field that did not include any of the reigning Olympic or World medalists. De Grasse shared the 2015 World 100m bronze with American Trayvon Bromell, who had been entered in Birmingham but pulled out after he appeared to have problems at a meet in Rome on Thursday.

MORE: Sanya Richards-Ross carried off track with injury

Tori Bowie pulls up at Birmingham Diamond League; recap

Tori Bowie
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source: Getty ImagesThe world’s fastest woman this year pulled up with an apparent injury at a Diamond League meet in Birmingham, England, on Sunday.

Tori Bowie had to be helped off the track after she came to a stop less than halfway through the 100m. Jamaican Kerron Stewart won in 11.22 seconds.

Bowie previously suffered a leg injury at the U.S. Championships in late June but came back to run a world-leading 10.80 seconds in Monaco on July 18. Bowie, primarily a long jumper until March, is also the second-fastest woman over 200m this year (22.18).

The women’s 100m was one of the marquee events of the meet, but Bowie’s injury came after Olympic 100m champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce was a non-starter and Olympic 200m champion Allyson Felix  failed to qualify for the final.

The Diamond League resumes with the first of two finals meets in Zurich on Thursday.

In other events Sunday, Beijing Olympic champion Dawn Harper-Nelson won the 100m hurdles in 12.66. London Olympic champion Sally Pearson was third in 12.85, and World champion Brianna Rollins was fifth in 12.95.

Kenyan Asbel Kiprop won a star-studded men’s mile in 3:51.89, beating world leader Ayanleh Souleiman (3:52.07). Americans Leo Manzano and Matthew Centrowitz were eighth and ninth.

Britain’s most famous active track and field athlete, Mo Farah, separated from the pack in the men’s two mile and won in 8:07.85, a new European record in the non-Olympic event.

Olympic 800m champion David Rudisha won a 600m race in 1:13.71.

World champion Christine Ohuruogu won the 400m in 51.40. Neither Olympic champion Sanya Richards-Ross nor world leader Francena McCorory was in the field.

Kirani James won the men’s 400m in 44.59, lacking competition without rival LaShawn Merritt on hand.

Qatar’s Mutaz Barshim won the high jump with a 2.38m clearance over Ukraine’s Bohdan Bondarenko. Both men failed at three attempts at 2.41m. The world record is 2.45m.

Jamaicans Kemar Bailey-Cole and Nickel Ashmeade took the men’s 100m and 200m in 10.08 and 20.33, respectively. They didn’t have to face Usain Bolt or Justin Gatlin.

Olympic triple jump champion Christian Taylor won the long jump at 8.09m, beating British Olympic champion Greg Rutherford and U.S. champion Jeff Henderson.

New Zealand’s Valerie Adams won her 55th straight shot put competition.

Usain Bolt ends his season