Boston Marathon

Shalane Flanagan leads U.S. field for Boston Marathon

1 Comment

Shalane Flanagan decided not to retire following the biggest win of her career. Rather, she hopes to perhaps top her New York City Marathon victory by winning the Boston Marathon on April 16.

“My heart ♥️ said……give it one more chance, try again,” was posted on Flanagan’s social media Monday. “See everyone in Boston on Patriots Day.”

The 36-year-old, four-time Olympian is entered in the world’s oldest annual 26.2-mile race after spending November debating retirement.

She’ll be joined in the field by a slew of American stars:

Jordan Hasay — 2017 Boston Marathon, third place
Desi Linden — 2011 Boston Marathon, second place
Molly Huddle — 2016 NYC Marathon, third place
Deena Kastor — 2004 Olympic bronze medalist

Galen Rupp — 2017 Boston Marathon, second place
Dathan Ritzenhein — Three-time Olympian
Abdi Abdirahman — 2016 NYC Marathon, third place

Flanagan became the first U.S. female runner to win New York in 40 years by upsetting world-record holder Mary Keitany of Kenya on Nov. 5.

Flanagan teased before the race that she might retire if she pulled off the upset victory, likening it to winning the Super Bowl and walking away.

“I don’t know what it feels like to be Tom Brady or anything, but it’s pretty epic,” she said one day after the win. “Imagine everyone has an individual goal in their lives that they’re striving for, potentially, and achieving that ultimate goal that seems audacious at times. That seems so far-fetched.

“I’m very passionate about running, but there are other things in my life that I love. … There’s other ways I want to contribute to the sport. I want to teach young women how to eat well and how to take care of themselves. Yeah, I have other passions that are starting to bubble up.”

Flanagan has raced 10 marathons since winning a 2008 Olympic 10,000m silver medal, including three times in Boston, near her hometown of Marblehead, Mass.

She was fourth in 2013, fifth in 2014 and ninth in 2015. The last U.S. female runner to win Boston was Lisa Larsen Weidenbach in 1985.

Flanagan, who with her husband fostered two teenage girls since Rio, will release her second co-authored cookbook — “Run Fast. Cook Fast. Eat Slow” — in August.

“I’d have to really assess what’s going to drive me forward,” she said after winning New York. “If I do continue to go forward, you have to have a lot of motivation to be in this sport. It’s an all-encompassing lifestyle. It’s not a nine-to-five. It’s literally every single day you’re making decisions. How can I be the best possible athlete? You don’t check in and check out.”

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Nick Symmonds, figure skating champ run Honolulu Marathon

Adidas apologizes for ‘insensitive’ email to Boston Marathon participants

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Adidas said it is “incredibly sorry” after its tone-deaf email congratulating participants who “survived the Boston Marathon.”

An Adidas email to Boston participants included the subject line, “Congrats, you survived the Boston Marathon!” on Tuesday morning, one day after the race.

On Tuesday afternoon, Adidas apologized and called the wording “insensitive,” four years after twin bombings at the Boston Marathon killed three people and injured more than 260.

“We are incredibly sorry,” Adidas said in a statement. “Clearly, there was no thought given to the insensitive email subject line we sent Tuesday. We deeply apologize for our mistake. The Boston Marathon is one of the most inspirational sporting events in the world. Every year we’re reminded of the hope and resiliency of the running community at this event.”

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

VIDEO: Marine who lost leg in Afghanistan runs Boston with American flag

Marine who lost leg in Afghanistan runs Boston Marathon with American flag

5 Comments

On the best day for Americans in the Boston Marathon’s prize-money era, it was a man who took nearly six hours to finish who provided the most indelible image of American pride.

Staff Sgt. Jose Luis Sanchez, a retired Marine who lost the lower part of his left leg stepping on an IED in Afghanistan in 2011, was filmed and photographed throughout Monday’s 26.2-mile race.

Sanchez wore a “Semper Fi” shirt, ran on a prosthetic left leg and carried an American flag.

“I wanted to not only recognize veterans, but everyone that thinks that they’re unable to do something,” Sanchez told media afterward. “I couldn’t stand up for more than three seconds or walk more than two feet [after stepped on an IED]. And I found my for four, five years, just to be able to walk farther, be able to lift my body up. I kept on pushing it. Mentally and spiritually, I was good, so I wanted to push it even farther and do the marathon.”

The flag Sanchez carried Monday was full of inspirational messages. Via Runner’s World:

The flag was sent to him by his patrol unit as he recovered in the hospital.

“I boxed it up for three or four years because I didn’t want to acknowledge it,” Sanchez said. “One day I opened it back up and read through the inspirational quotes they sent me and I was motivated.”

“It’s not for me, it’s for others to be inspired, to be motivated,” Sanchez said on local Boston TV in the finish area. “We live for others. I’ve learned that throughout being angry, being frustrated. With all that PTSD, I’m channeling it to do positive.”

He previously ran the Boston Marathon and Marine Corps Marathon in Washington, D.C., last year, carrying that same flag.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Nike picks fitting anniversary weekend for sub-2 attempt

Pretty amazing. #bostonmarathon #inspiring 🇺🇸

A post shared by Laura Vitalini (@lkv117) on