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Adidas apologizes for ‘insensitive’ email to Boston Marathon participants

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Adidas said it is “incredibly sorry” after its tone-deaf email congratulating participants who “survived the Boston Marathon.”

An Adidas email to Boston participants included the subject line, “Congrats, you survived the Boston Marathon!” on Tuesday morning, one day after the race.

On Tuesday afternoon, Adidas apologized and called the wording “insensitive,” four years after twin bombings at the Boston Marathon killed three people and injured more than 260.

“We are incredibly sorry,” Adidas said in a statement. “Clearly, there was no thought given to the insensitive email subject line we sent Tuesday. We deeply apologize for our mistake. The Boston Marathon is one of the most inspirational sporting events in the world. Every year we’re reminded of the hope and resiliency of the running community at this event.”

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VIDEO: Marine who lost leg in Afghanistan runs Boston with American flag

Marine who lost leg in Afghanistan runs Boston Marathon with American flag

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On the best day for Americans in the Boston Marathon’s prize-money era, it was a man who took nearly six hours to finish who provided the most indelible image of American pride.

Staff Sgt. Jose Luis Sanchez, a retired Marine who lost the lower part of his left leg stepping on an IED in Afghanistan in 2011, was filmed and photographed throughout Monday’s 26.2-mile race.

Sanchez wore a “Semper Fi” shirt, ran on a prosthetic left leg and carried an American flag.

“I wanted to not only recognize veterans, but everyone that thinks that they’re unable to do something,” Sanchez told media afterward. “I couldn’t stand up for more than three seconds or walk more than two feet [after stepped on an IED]. And I found my for four, five years, just to be able to walk farther, be able to lift my body up. I kept on pushing it. Mentally and spiritually, I was good, so I wanted to push it even farther and do the marathon.”

The flag Sanchez carried Monday was full of inspirational messages. Via Runner’s World:

The flag was sent to him by his patrol unit as he recovered in the hospital.

“I boxed it up for three or four years because I didn’t want to acknowledge it,” Sanchez said. “One day I opened it back up and read through the inspirational quotes they sent me and I was motivated.”

“It’s not for me, it’s for others to be inspired, to be motivated,” Sanchez said on local Boston TV in the finish area. “We live for others. I’ve learned that throughout being angry, being frustrated. With all that PTSD, I’m channeling it to do positive.”

He previously ran the Boston Marathon and Marine Corps Marathon in Washington, D.C., last year, carrying that same flag.

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Pretty amazing. #bostonmarathon #inspiring 🇺🇸

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Proud to be an American 🇺🇸 #bostonmarathon

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Meb Keflezighi reminded of 2014 in Boston Marathon farewell

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Of all the encouragement Meb Keflezighi received at his final Boston Marathon, one message stood out on the 26.2-mile course.

The 2014 Boston winner’s eyes caught a sign that told him he was a hero.

“It was the thrill of a lifetime again,” Keflezighi said after finishing 13th on Monday, more than seven minutes behind winner Geoffrey Kirui of Kenya. “It’s not like a victory that I could have ended up with, but at the same time, I enjoyed every bit of it.”

Keflezighi, who turns 42 next month, crossed the Boylston Street finish line in 2 hours, 17 minutes, in his 25th and penultimate marathon. It was his first time outside the top eight in five Boston starts.

Keflezighi started drifting behind the leaders before the halfway point on a warm day with temperatures in the 70s. As thoughts of a win faded away, the Eritrean-born, four-time U.S. Olympian ran alone behind the lead pack and was showered with praise.

“Everybody was saying you’re our hero, we love you, and all that,” said Keflezighi, the only U.S. male or female runner to win Boston since 1985. “Even if you finish 15th or 20th, they still love you.”

Keflezighi blew a kiss, pumped his arms and gave thumbs-up to the Boylston Street crowd in his final strides.

In a poignant finish-area moment, Keflezighi embraced the family of Martin Richard on Boylston Street, feet away from where Richard, then 8 years old, was killed in the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings.

In 2014, Keflezighi ran to a surprise victory in Boston. He raced that day with the names written on his bib corners of Martin and the other three people who were killed by the attackers.

“Winning the 2014 Boston Marathon changed my life,” Keflezighi said. “I remember I was at the airport, and somebody came up to me and said whenever you come to Boston, you should never buy a beer.”

Keflezighi, a 2004 Olympic silver medalist, hopes to remain affiliated with the Boston Marathon in a non-racing capacity in future years. His final marathon will be in New York City on Nov. 5.

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