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U.S., Great Britain to hold track and field dual meet

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The U.S. and Great Britain go head-to-head in a track and field meet on July 21 at the London Olympic Stadium.

“The Meet” will include nine running, jumping, hurdles and relay events and last two hours. Specific events and athletes will be announced early next year.

The U.S. topped the overall medal standings at every Olympics and world outdoor championships since 2004.

Great Britain is one of three countries to earn at least five medals at every Olympics and worlds since 2007, joining the U.S. and Kenya.

British athletes made six podiums at the just-completed worlds at the London Olympic Stadium, including in all four relays. The other two medals came from Mo Farah, who is moving to road racing and marathons after this season.

“The Meet” is similar to swimming’s “Duel in the Pool,” a biennial head-to-head competition between the U.S. and rival Australia from 2003 through 2007 and between the U.S. and Europe between 2009 and 2015.

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VIDEO: Ten memorable races from worlds

Mo Farah loses final track championship race (video)

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LONDON (AP) — It was the familiar “Mobot” celebration on an unfamiliar face.

Muktar Edris put an end to Mo Farah’s dominance in the distance races at the world championships on Saturday, and he crossed the line doing the move that Farah made famous at the Olympics five years ago.

Edris out-kicked Farah down the stretch, beating the British runner at his own game in the final seconds of the 5000m.

“Mo has many victories but now I have one. I am the new champion for Ethiopia,” Edris said. “That’s why I did the ‘Mobot.’ I am the next champion.”

Farah won the long-distance double at the 2012 London Olympics. As he crossed the finish line in those races, he raised his arms and put his hands on the top of his head, creating a sort of “M″ shape.

He’s been using that pose ever since as he continued to rule the track by again winning the 5000m and 10,000m in Rio.

He didn’t have enough in his legs to get his arms up over his head this time, settling for silver and falling down on the track in exhaustion after crossing the line.

“I gave it all,” said Farah, who was running on the track at a major championship for the last time. “I didn’t have a single bit left at the end.”

Farah, now 34 years old and a six-time world champion, knew the opposition would be gunning for him. And they did.

They boxed Farah in. They changed the pace of the race. They made him work hard knowing that his 10,000-meter victory on the opening day of the championships would take something out of his punishing finish.

“Tactically, I was trying to cover every move,” Farah said. “They had the game plan. One of them was going to sacrifice themselves. That’s what they did tonight, and the better man won.”

Edris won in 13 minutes, 33.79 seconds, finishing .43 seconds ahead of Farah. Paul Chelimo of the United States took bronze.

“I was highly prepared for this race and I knew I was going to beat Mo Farah,” Edris said. “After the 10km, he was maybe tired so he did not have enough for the last kick. I was stronger.”

It wasn’t the medal Farah was after, but there will likely be more chances for gold.

Unlike Usain Bolt, who is retiring from the sport following this year’s worlds, Farah is just switching disciplines and will soon start competing in marathons.

That means Farah could still be taking his familiar spot at the top of the podium at the Olympics or the worlds sometime in the near future, and maybe even employing the “Mobot” once again.

Until then, though, he’ll have some fond memories of the track.

“It’s been amazing,” Farah said. “It’s been a long journey but it’s been incredible.”

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VIDEO: Hurdler stretchered off after head-first crash

Mo Farah opens farewell with third straight world 10,000m title (video)

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Mo Farah extended his distance dominance, winning his fifth straight global title in the 10,000m and delighting the home crowd at the world championships in London on Friday night.

Farah, the 2012 and 2016 Olympic 5000m and 10,000m champion, is racing his farewell track season before moving to road racing and marathons.

He won in 26:49.51, the fastest Olympic or world championship 10,000m final since 2009, before Farah rose to the top of distance running. It’s the first time Farah has gone sub-27 minutes in a global final.

“Tonight was one of the toughest races of my life,” Farah told media at the Olympic Stadium, where he was one of three “Super Saturday” headliners on this date five years ago. “The guys chucked everything at me.”

Ugandan Joshua Cheptegei took silver in a personal best, .43 behind, failing to keep up with Farah’s trademark final sprint. Kenyan Paul Tanui, the Olympic silver medalist, bagged bronze.

Farah went to the lead with 600 meters left in the 25-lap race, but the field made him work for it. Farah bumped with another runner on the final lap and was forced to take one step on the infield.

“I was tripped, I was kicked,” Farah said.

He took a victory lap with his four children on the track.

Eleven of the top 15 finishers ran personal bests, including all three Americans.

Farah goes for an 11th straight global title in the 5000m/10,000m distance races in the 5000m next week. But first, he saw a doctor about cuts on his bandaged left leg that he said might require stitches.

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WORLDS: TV Schedule | 5 Men’s Races to Watch | 5 Women’s Races

Men’s 10,000m Results
Gold: Mo Farah (GBR) — 26:49.51

Silver: Joshua Cheptegei (UGA) — 26:49.94
Bronze: Paul Tanui (KEN) — 26:50.60
9. Shadrack Kipchirchir (USA) — 27:07.55
13. Leonard Korir (USA) — 27:20.18
15. Hassan Mead (USA) — 27:32.49