Hillary Clinton

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Hillary Clinton has extensive Olympic history

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Hillary Clinton has done all of these things:

Attended a Summer Olympics
Attended a Winter Olympics
Gave a speech at an Olympic torch relay lighting at Olympia, Greece
Gave a speech at an IOC Olympic host-city vote session

Clinton is an “Olympics nut,” her then-press secretary, Lisa Caputo, said in 1996, according to USA Today.

As First Lady, Clinton traveled to the 1994 Lillehammer Winter Games and the 1996 Atlanta Games.

In 1994, Clinton was most noticed for attending the men’s downhill in Kvitfjell, bearing freezing temperatures near the finish line with Olympic sprint gold medalist Florence Griffith-Joyner.

American Tommy Moe was the surprise race winner. Last month, Moe was asked about meeting Clinton in the finish area.

“We took a photo, and she was just really unassuming and just like, ‘Congratulations, this is my [13-year-old] daughter, Chelsea,'” Moe said at the U.S. Ski Team’s Gold Medal Gala fundraiser on Wall Street. “I was on the cover of [Sports Illustrated], and they had a photo of us [in the magazine]. … I think Florence Griffith-Joyner was freezing her butt off, because it was definitely five degrees below zero.”

Moe said he later received a call from President Bill Clinton, who was not in Norway, and answered the phone with the greeting, “Hey Bill, how’s it going?”

In March 1996, Clinton flew to Greece to and spoke at the beginning of the Atlanta Olympic torch relay at the ancient Olympic site of Olympia.

“These Olympic Games, which have moved princes to lift peasants onto their shoulders, emphasize an inescapable dimension of the human experience — that we are all members of one global family,” Clinton said in Olympia, according to The Associated Press.

In July, she attended the Opening Ceremony in Atlanta, where her husband declared the Games open. Clinton and Trump were both at Centennial Olympic Stadium that night.

She later took in the action, including swimming (where she had her photo taken with the U.S. women’s 4x200m freestyle relay team), gymnastics (photo with the Magnificent Seven) and diving (sat next to Carl Lewis).

Finally in 2005, Clinton, then a U.S. Senator in New York, spoke at the IOC session that would determine the 2012 Olympic host city.

She was part of the New York City 2012 Olympic bid team, flanked by Olympic champions Oksana Baiul, Nadia Comaneci, Bob Beamon and Ian Thorpe. New York City would finish fourth out of five cities in the voting won by London.

For her 2016 presidential campaign, Clinton brought on two-time Olympic medalist figure skater Michelle Kwan as a surrogate outreach coordinator. Kwan detailed her job here.

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Ibtihaj Muhammad discusses election, her future

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LOS ANGELES—After failing to make the 2012 U.S. Olympic team, Ibtihaj Muhammad was singularly focused on qualifying for the 2016 Olympics. Now she has a new date circled on her calendar: November 8.

“I am really looking forward to the [presidential] election,” Muhammad said. “We need a reprieve from all of this trauma.”

This summer Muhammad became the first American to compete in the Olympics wearing a hijab, the traditional headscarf worn by Muslim women. The distinction earned significant media attention for Muhammad, who won a fencing team sabre bronze medal in Rio. She appeared on “The Ellen Show,” and was named one of the 100 most influential people for 2016 by TIME Magazine.

She is often asked about Donald Trump, the Republican presidential nominee who has proposed barring all Muslims from entering the United States. Muhammad famously responded “Who?” when reporters peppered her with questions about Trump during the Olympics.

Now that the Rio Games are over, Muhammad is more willing to express her political opinions.

“This is a moment in time where we can reject hate and take a stand as Americans to say this candidate doesn’t represent us,” Muhammad said.

Muhammad was vague when asked if she planned on endorsing a specific presidential candidate, instead encouraging everyone to remember to vote. When pressed, Muhammad revealed that she plans on voting for Hillary Clinton.

“To me, it is very clear which presidential candidate feels more in line with supporting minority communities in this country,” Muhammad said.

Clinton’s campaign sent a congratulatory tweet to Muhammad during the Olympics.

“Having Hillary Clinton, hopefully our next president, acknowledge Muslim women on the United States Olympic team is a wonderful moment not just for me, but for all of us,” Muhammad said. “It shows that we are a country of inclusion, acceptance and diversity.”

Muhammad has maintained a whirlwind travel schedule since the Rio Games, making speaking appearances and promoting her clothing line, Louella, which she describes as “modest, fashion-forward clothing.”

She recently returned to training in preparation for the Grand Prix season, which begins this December in Cancun, and eventually the 2017 World Championships. But she has not committed to attempting to compete at the 2020 Olympics, or even future world championships.

“I’m a firm believer in taking things day by day,” Muhammad said. “I don’t even know my plans for tomorrow.”

Muhammad, who studied international relations at Duke University, has considered eventually running for elected office. She served on the U.S. Department of State’s Empowering Women and Girls Through Sport Initiative, received a shout-out in a February speech from President Barack Obama, and even taught First Lady Michelle Obama how to fence.

“If I can use politics as an avenue to encourage and inspire our youth, why not?” Muhammad said.

Muhammad spoke on a panel at the LA84 Foundation Summit last week. Emcee Julie Foudy, a three-time U.S. Olympic soccer medalist, made Muhammad promise that she would consider running for president one day.

“I can’t wait for Donald Trump to be around to see that,” Foudy said.

MORE: First Lady ‘fences’ with Ibtihaj Muhammad

Michelle Kwan works long hours for Hillary Clinton campaign

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Michelle Kwan says the first time she met Hillary Clinton was April 29, 1998, visiting the White House with the U.S. Olympic team, two months after the Nagano Winter Games.

Now, more than 18 years later, the two-time Olympic figure skating medalist is in the final days of trying to help get Clinton back to the White House.

She joined the campaign 16 months ago as a surrogate outreach coordinator, working with celebrity and politician endorsers. The list includes Katy Perry, Barbra Streisand, John Legend and Magic Johnson. If Kwan hasn’t spoken to them personally, she’s been in touch with their managers.

“Long hours,” Kwan said while rushing through the red carpet of the Women’s Sports Foundation awards in New York City on Wednesday.

Kwan, 36, appeared at the awards with other female sports stars such as Billie Jean King, Laila Ali and a host of Olympic champions. She had to jet early, however, to attend a watch party for the third and final presidential debate between Clinton and Donald Trump.

Clinton has a unique relationship with the Olympics.

She sat next to Florence Griffith-Joyner in the frozen stands in Kvitfjell, Norway, at the Lillehammer 1994 men’s downhill. Clinton attended the start of the 1996 Olympic torch relay in Olympia, Greece. And she gave a speech for the failed New York City 2012 Olympic bid at an International Olympic Committee session in Singapore in 2005.

In 2006, Kwan was appointed the first U.S. public diplomacy envoy by then-Secretary of State Condoleeza Rice.

Kwan continued in that role when Clinton succeeded Rice and then got what she called her “first real job” with the State Department, senior adviser for public diplomacy and public affairs, after earning her master’s degree in 2011.

She helped her husband, Clay Pell, in his 2014 Democratic bid for the Governor of Rhode Island. Pell finished third in his primary.

In the last year-plus, Kwan stumped for Clinton in at least 18 states, according to her social media logs. In speeches at universities or forums, she breaks the ice by remembering her experiences performing at nearby arenas. She knocks on doors and works the phones.

“Super fun,” Kwan has said, “and nerve-racking.”

Kwan hosted the Periscope of Clinton’s first campaign rally on Roosevelt Island just off Manhattan, not far from Kwan’s campaign headquarters desk in Brooklyn, on June 13, 2015.

“It really comes into play the skills that you learn in figure skating about determination, hard work, perseverance,” Kwan said on The Skating Lesson. “I think the schedule itself is kind of what was like training for the Olympic Games, the world championships. You wake up in the morning, determined, you have a set of goals, you organize, you’re just at it and you’re taking one day at a time. And then, before you know, it’s 7 o’clock at night.”

Kwan is documenting the last 100 days of the campaign on her Instagram. Where will she be posting from on Nov. 8?

“I can’t tell you that,” she said, smiling, on the red carpet Wednesday night.

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