marathon

Getty Images

Galen Rupp, Jordan Hasay set next marathon after Boston podiums

Leave a comment

Galen Rupp and Jordan Hasay will race the Chicago Marathon on Oct. 8 rather than the Berlin or New York City Marathons this fall.

Rupp and Hasay finished second and third, respectively, in the Boston Marathon on April 17. It marked the best U.S. combined male and female finishes since 1985.

Chicago is expected to mark Rupp’s move to full-time marathoning after he failed to make the U.S. team for August’s world championships in the 10,000m.

Rupp, 31, has a sterling early marathon record. He debuted by winning the Olympic Trials on Feb. 13, 2016, then earned a bronze medal in Rio. Rupp made his city marathon debut in Boston, finishing 21 seconds behind Kenyan winner Geoffrey Kirui.

He could become the first U.S. runner of either gender to win Chicago since Deena Kastor in 2005.

The other star U.S. men’s marathoner, Meb Keflezighi, will race his final elite marathon in New York City on Nov. 5.

Hasay, who shares a coach with Rupp in three-time New York City Marathon winner Alberto Salazar, will race her second career marathon in Chicago. The 25-year-old ran the fastest debut marathon by a U.S. woman by three minutes in finishing third in Boston.

The other top U.S. female marathoners — Amy CraggShalane FlanaganMolly Huddle and Desi Linden — have not announced fall marathon plans.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: No. 2 women’s marathoner of all time signs up for NYC

Professional runner outruns 2 bears while training in woods

2 Comments

AUBURN, Maine (AP) — A professional runner from Kenya who was out training on a nature trail in the woods near his home in Maine says he encountered two charging black bears but was able to outrun them during a frantic sprint to a nearby vacant house for cover.

Moninda Marube said when he saw the bears early Wednesday his instincts kicked in and he did what he does best: run.

He told the (Lewiston, Maine) Sun Journal that the bears were 20 yards (18 meters) away from him and a vacant house was 20 yards away in the opposite direction. So he made a run for the house, with the bears closing to within 10 yards (9 meters) by the time he found safety on the house’s screened porch.

The bears stopped, not realizing they could’ve easily crashed through the flimsy porch screens, Marube said. They sniffed around for a while before wandering away.

Wardens advise people who encounter black bears to make themselves appear big, make noise and back away slowly. But they recommend people stand their ground if a black bear charges and say if the bear attacks, then fight back.

But Marube said that’s easier said than done.

He said he knew that black bears can climb trees, so he couldn’t climb to safety. He said he considered jumping in a nearby lake, but he can’t swim.

He said he initially engaged in a stare-down with the bears but the bears charged the moment he turned his back on them.

Marube, a student at the University of Maine at Farmington who finished third in the 2012 Maine Marathon and won the 2013 half-marathon, said he’d once encountered a leopard perched in a tree while alone in Africa — but the bears were scarier.

He said he learned an important lesson from his close encounter with Maine’s wildlife: “Just make peace with people. You never know when your day comes.”

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: World’s top marathoner eyes world record in next race

Eliud Kipchoge sets next attempt at marathon world record

Getty Images
1 Comment

Eliud Kipchoge tried to break two hours in his last marathon. He’ll try to lower the world record at his next one.

The Kenyan Olympic champion entered the Berlin Marathon on Sept. 24, four and a half months after running 2:00:25 at Nike’s sub-two-hour marathon event in Monza, Italy.

“I was very close to breaking the two-hour barrier in Monza,” Kipchoge said in a press release Thursday. “Now I believe the BMW Berlin Marathon is the perfect venue for attacking the official world record”

Berlin, with its pancake-flat roads, was the site of the last six times the men’s 26.2-mile world record was lowered in the last 14 years, coming down from 2:05:38 to the current mark of 2:02:57.

Kipchoge, 32, won his last Berlin start in 2015, clocking 2:04:00 with his insoles infamously slipping out the back of his shoes and flopping the last half of the race. He also finished runner-up to Wilson Kipsang in 2013.

Kipchoge is believed to be primed to break the 2:02:57 world record that countryman Dennis Kimetto ran in Berlin in 2014.

On May 6, Kipchoge ran 2:00:25 in Nike’s staged sub-two-hour marathon attempt on a Formula One race track. It was contested under special conditions that made it ineligible for record purposes with pacers entering mid-race.

Before that, Kipchoge won five straight major marathons, including the Rio Olympics in 2:08:44 in conditions not suitable for a fast time. He won the Olympic marathon by 70 seconds, the largest margin of victory since Frank Shorter won in 1972.

The other marquee fall marathon — New York City — is a more difficult course and not suited for world-record chasing.

Kipchoge withdrew from selection for Kenya’s team for the world championships in London in August.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: No. 2 women’s marathoner of all time signs up for NYC