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More Russians retroactively disqualified from 2012 Olympics

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MOSCOW (AP) — Three Russian athletes have been disqualified from the 2012 Olympics after failing doping retests, the country’s track and field federation said.

Hammer throwers Maria Bespalova and Gulfiya Khanafeeva and triple jumper Viktoria Valyukevich were all disqualified. None were medalists.

The disqualifications of Bespalova and Khanafeeva mean all three Russian women who competed in the hammer throw in 2012 have tested positive for doping. Tatyana Lysenko was the original winner, but was stripped of her gold medal in October.

Valyukevich, a former European indoor champion, was eighth in the triple jump at the 2012 Olympics and finished two places ahead of Russian teammate Tatyana Lebedeva, who has been stripped of two medals from the 2008 Beijing Games for doping.

In Tuesday’s statement, Russian officials didn’t say which substances were involved. The International Olympic Committee had no immediate comment.

It is the third time Khanafeeva, who won European championship silver in 2005, has been found guilty of a doping offense. She previously served bans in 2002 for a positive test and in 2008 for providing someone else’s urine in a drug test sample.

Bespalova is currently serving a four-year ban after testing positive for a banned steroid in 2015.

Since the IOC started retesting samples from the 2008 and 2012 Games last year, more than 30 Russians in various sports have tested positive. That makes them the largest group out of more than 100 positive tests. Seven more Russians have been disqualified for other doping offenses.

Russia has lost 26 Olympic medals as a result, most of them in track and field. Many of the cases involve turinabol, a substance which former Moscow anti-doping laboratory director Grigory Rodchenkov has admitted supplying to athletes in a steroid cocktail.

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MORE: Russians face exclusion for not returning Olympic medals

Usain Bolt’s home finale to include Wayde van Niekerk, Olympic champs

Wayde van Niekerk, Usain Bolt
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Usain Bolt‘s last scheduled meet in Jamaica will be star-studded.

Bolt will be joined by Olympic champions Wayde van NiekerkDavid RudishaMo Farah and Christian Taylor at the Racers Grand Prix in Kingston on June 10, meet organizers announced Friday.

It would be a surprise if any of Bolt, Van Niekerk, Rudisha and Farah are in the same race. Bolt is expected to contest the 100m.

Jamaica’s other top sprinters — Yohan BlakeAsafa Powell and Warren Weir — plus U.S. Olympians Tori BowieTrayvon BromellDalilah Muhammad and Jenna Prandini are also confirmed for the meet. Plus, South African Akani Simbine, the fastest man in the world so far this year at 9.93 seconds.

“I might shed a tear even though I’m not an emotional person as I close out where it started on Jamaican soil,” Bolt said Friday, according to Reuters, adding that he wanted to run under 9.8 seconds.

Bolt has broken 9.8 twice since the 2012 Olympics, in winning the 2013 and 2015 World Championships in 9.77 and 9.79, respectively.

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MORE: Bode Miller says ‘a lot of pieces’ necessary for possible comeback

Norbert Sander, NYC Marathon winner and Armory restorer, dies at 74

Norb Sander
The Armory
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Dr. Norbert W. Sander, who won the 1974 New York City Marathon and later led the restoration of the Armory in Manhattan, has died unexpectedly at age 74.

Sander remains the only male New Yorker to win the New York City Marathon. He prevailed when the 26.2-mile event was held in Central Park, two years before it became the five-borough race it is today.

More than a decade later, while practicing family medicine in the Bronx, Sander came across the Armory, a formerly famed indoor track and field facility in the Washington Heights neighborhood where he raced as a boy.

But the Fort Washington Avenue facility had become a “dilapidated, overcrowded homeless shelter” in the 1980s, according to the New York Road Runners. There were about 2,000 homeless men housed in unsanitary conditions. Every window was broken, according to Fordham Preparatory School, from which Sander graduated in 1960.

“It had been a shrine, a holy place,” Sander said of the facility that opened in 1909 in a 1995 Sports Illustrated article, according to Fordham Prep. “Then the homeless were moved in, and it became the heart of darkness.”

Sander, as president, CEO and founder of the Armory Foundation, helped the homeless relocate to better living conditions.

He lobbied city corporations and athletic companies to raise money to restore the Armory. Efforts by those including Sander netted $25 million to restore the building, according to Fordham Prep.

Track and field competition returned to the Armory in 1993 after a seven-year hiatus, according to The New York Times.

Now, it’s a national historic landmark, houses the National Track and Field Hall of Fame and hosts the Millrose Games every February, arguably the most prestigious annual indoor track and field meet. The Millrose Games feature not only Olympic and world champions, but also youth and high school races.

In 2014, Sander received the Abebe Bikila Award from the New York Road Runners for his “outstanding commitment and contributions to the sport of distance running.” The award was named after the Ethiopian marathoner who became the first sub-Saharan African to win an Olympic gold medal.

“Dr. Sander was a partner to USATF who cared passionately about the sport and even more about the kids who benefit from the Armory’s track and field, educational and enrichment programs,” USA Track and Field CEO Max Siegel said in a statement. “Countless young people have been impacted by his work. His death is a shock to all of us and deeply affects this sport. On behalf of USATF, we offer our deepest condolences to his family, friends and colleagues.”