Tag: track and field

Bob Beamon
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Bob Beamon on his favorite track and field record, amputee long jumper, Mike Powell’s comeback

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NEW YORK — Bob Beamon holds the longest-standing Olympic track and field record, and it looks likely to survive Rio 2016 and cross the 50-year mark.

Beamon leaped 8.90 meters to win the Mexico City 1968 Olympic long jump. It smashed the world record at the time and stood as the longest jump ever until Mike Powell‘s 8.95-meter leap in the epic 1991 World Championships.

Nobody, in any competition, has come within 17 inches of Beamon’s Olympic record since 2009. It would be astonishing if the Olympic record fell in Rio next year.

NBC SportsWorld documented Beamon, Powell, Carl Lewis and the long jump world record last fall.

OlympicTalk spoke with Beamon at NFL Hall of Famer Nick Buoniconti‘s Fund to Cure Paralysis dinner at New York’s Waldorf Astoria hotel Tuesday.

OlympicTalk: Which track and field record, outside of the long jump, impressed you the most?

Beamon: I think that Al Oerter is probably one of the most exciting who has broken world records but also is a five-time Olympian, just incredible [Oerter won four straight Olympic discus titles and held the world record for most of 1962-64]. I think Edwin Moses, 107 wins consecutively [in the 400m hurdles from 1977-87]. I think Carl Lewis duplicating Jesse Owens, four gold medals [in 1984]. He’s amazing. He’s a guy that had all the potential to hold the world record in the 100m, the 200m and the long jump [Lewis held the world record in the 100m only]. I think he’s probably at the top, but of course you have Usain Bolt now who has mastered the 100m and the 200m.

OlympicTalk: You mentioned last year that you were working on a documentary to come out in 2016. What’s the status of that?

Beamon: It’s still going. Since I’ve been doing some things with the IOC but also Adidas, I’ve stayed pretty busy, but, yes, that’s a top priority.

OlympicTalk: How would you feel if you had to compete against impressive German amputee long jumper Markus Rehm, who has won against able-bodied athletes?

Beamon: I think it’s amazing that people don’t give up and that they feel they’re just as competitive as the next person. So you have to look at this athlete as probably, if not, a great one. He has what looks like a handicap, but he’s really not handicapped. If I was competing against him, I would say, “Good luck to you,” because you have the juice to win. I’d give him all his dues.

OlympicTalk: Mike Powell said this year that he was considering trying to qualify for and then entering the 2016 U.S. Olympic Trials. What do you think of that?

Beamon: I didn’t know that. I think Mike is extremely ambitious, and I think that, you know, who knows? Who knows when you should retire? People are living longer. People are living better. I’m almost 70 years old. Sometimes I feel like I might want to come out of retirement [laughs].

Editor’s Note: Beamon retired before the 1972 Olympics and said he never competed in masters-age track and field competitions.

MORE TRACK AND FIELD: Usain Bolt beaten by boy YouTube sensation on ‘Ellen’

Usain Bolt beaten in race by boy YouTube sensation on Ellen

Usain Bolt
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Usain Bolt wasn’t dressed to race, but he took up a challenge from an unlikely opponent at The Ellen DeGeneres Show on Tuesday.

The six-time Olympic champion went on the show as part of a Los Angeles visit, three days after he partied at Oktoberfest in Munich for a third straight year. Also Tuesday, Bolt met with USC sprinter Andre De Grasse, who shared bronze in the World Championships 100m behind the gold medalist Bolt in Beijing on Aug. 23.

On Ellen, Demarjay Smith, an 8-year-old YouTube sensation for his videos as a personal trainer, said he could beat Bolt in a race. Watch the segment here.

“100 percent,” the Bronx boy said. “Trust me.”

Then Ellen brought Bolt out from off stage, all three of them did push-ups together and then headed to a parking lot for a race.

“Come on, Usain, don’t be scared of me,” the kid said.

Bolt, wearing jeans, did not back down, even though the starting blocks were positioned backwards. Smith clearly false-started, but Bolt didn’t call it back.

They sprinted for about 15 seconds, with Bolt unable to catch Smith and pulling up before the finish line, holding the back of his right leg.

“I got cramps,” Bolt said. “You got lucky, man. I want a rematch, though.”

Also on Ellen, Bolt talked about training for his last Olympics and that he’s considered moving into acting after his planned 2017 retirement. Watch part of that interview here.

MORE BOLT: Bolt receives gift from Segway cameraman

Big deal business.. Check me out tomorrow on @theellenshow

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Mary Cain ‘back to basics’ after ‘disappointing year’

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Mary Cain, who in 2013 became the youngest U.S. track and field athlete to make a World Championships team and turned pro at age 17 later that fall, is spending her run-up to next year and the 2016 Olympics home in New York rather than returning to Oregon where she went to college and trained last year.

In June, Cain finished eighth in the 1500m at the U.S. Championships, missing the top-four placement necessary to make the World Championships team.

“After a disappointing year, I knew that I needed a change,” Cain said in a blog post Tuesday. “For me, that meant returning home to New York (and its bagels) or where it all started. With 2016 being such an important year, it’s a blessing to be able to, as my mom says, ‘Go back to basics.'”

Cain, who was a freshman at the University of Portland last year, is still coached by three-time New York City Marathon champion Alberto Salazar with the aid of New Zealand 2004 Olympic 10,000m runner John Henwood, according to the blog.

“We’re trying to get [running] back to fun with her,” Henwood said, according to Runner’s World.

Cain moved from Bronxville, N.Y., to Portland after graduating high school last year, completing a decorated prep career filled with records and state and national titles. She trained with Salazar’s group, which includes Olympic 10,000m gold and silver medalists Mo Farah and Galen Rupp.

Cain won the World Junior Championships 3000m in 2014 and became the youngest woman to make a senior World Championships 1500m final in 2013, when she finished 10th.

“I always said the key to running well was keeping the sport fun,” Cain said in the blog post. “With the help of this great NY running community, I am happy to say that I have found that love again! I’m looking forward to a rewarding Indoor and Outdoor season.

“Thanks to everyone who has supported me through the ups and downs! I hope to make 2016 a year to remember!”

MORE TRACK AND FIELD: Usain Bolt returns to Oktoberfest, with Olympic Alpine skier