World Track and Field Championships

Ten memorable races from world track and field championships (video)

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Ten memorable races from the world track and field championships, including Usain Bolt‘s last events before retirement …

Usain Bolt upset by Justin Gatlin in 100m finale (Day 2)

For the first 95 meters, eyes were glued on Bolt trying to catch young American Christian Coleman. But it would be Justin Gatlin, out in lane 8, who shocked everyone with an incredible late surge to win his first global title in 12 years.

Women’s marathon ends in close sprint, U.S. medal (Day 3)

The top four finishers were separated by 10 seconds. The silver and bronze medalists finished in the same time after 26.2 miles on the roads of London, ending on Tower Bridge. Amy Cragg snagged third with her final kick, the first U.S. marathon medal at worlds since 1993.

Tori Bowie’s perfect lean steals 100m (Day 3)

In three years, Tori Bowie went from last place in the world indoor championships long jump to fastest woman in the world. The soft-spoken Mississippi native used a textbook lean — showing poise of a sprinter with two or three times her experience — to beat Ivorian Marie-Josée Ta Lou by .01.

A 1500m sprint for the ages (Day 4)

The women’s 1500m was billed as perhaps the most competitive final of the meet. It delivered. The last 100 meters were chaotic to say the least. Kenyan Faith Kipyegon won, but American Jenny Simpson again proved her racing acumen, moving up on the rail for silver in a race that also included Olympic 800m champion Caster Semenya (bronze) and world-record holder Genzebe Dibaba (12th).

Duck splashes in women’s 400m (Day 6)

The rematch between Allyson Felix and Shaunae Miller-Uibo provided another incredible finish. However, neither the defending world champion nor the reigning Olympic champion took gold in the London rain. Miller-Uibo came off the final turn in the lead, with Felix the primary chaser. But the Bahamian tripped after looking at the scoreboard. Felix didn’t have that extra gear. Instead, Phyllis Francis surged past both of them for her first individual global medal, a gold. Francis, a former University of Oregon standout, attributed her experience in Eugene for preparing her to race in wet, chilly conditions.

Wayde van Niekerk misses double on Turkey Day (Day 7)

Wayde van Niekerk’s admirable attempt to match Michael Johnson‘s 400m-200m double from the 1995 World Championships and 1996 Olympics came up two hundredths of a second short to an unknown.

Turkey’s Ramil Guliyev (born in Azerbaijan) stunned the Olympic Stadium by holding off Van Niekerk in the last strides of the 200m final. Guliyev came off the turn with a step on favorites Van Niekerk and Isaac Makwala — but the two Africans ran out of gas. Van Niekerk, tired from racing six times in six days, tightened up before his lean. Makwala, tired from his medical controversy and having raced a pair of 200m the night before, faded earlier in the stretch.

Shocking one-two in women’s steeplechase (Day 8)

In a meet full of upsets, you can make a strong argument this one-two was the most unforeseen. Americans Emma Coburn and Courtney Frerichs topped the strongest women’s 3000m steeplechase field of all time. Four years ago, the U.S. put no women in the world steeplechase final. Three years ago, Coburn was such an afterthought that East Africans thought she was a pacer in a Diamond League race. But in London, the Olympic bronze medalist Coburn lowered her American record and Frerichs set a personal best by 15 seconds. The next four finishers, all Kenyan-born, were four of the five fastest women of all time in the event.

Mo Farah beaten in last championship track race (Day 9)

For Mo Farah, it ended in tears. In his last global championship track race, the Brit lost at an Olympics or worlds for the first time since 2011. He had won the previous 10 straight Olympic and world championships 5000m and 10,000m. But Ethiopian Muktar Edris relegated Farah to silver in the 5000m and celebrated with his own version of Farah’s famous “Mobot.” Farah, 34, intends to move to road running and the marathon after this season.

Usain Bolt tumbles in last career race (Day 9)

It was not a fairytale ending to Usain Bolt’s career. It was a disastrous one. Bolt pulled up with a hamstring injury and tumbled to the track while anchoring Jamaica’s 4x100m relay. He lay face down, his hands covering his eyes in pain. Bolt later got up and was helped across the finish line by his teammates.

One last surprise in 4x400m (Day 10)

Fittingly, worlds ended with a first-time champion upsetting a global power. Trinidad and Tobago, a twin-island nation of some 1.5 million people, won the 4x400m with an anchor-leg surge past the U.S., population 320 million.

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MORE: U.S. ties world championships medal record

Usain Bolt does not regret racing in 2017; no desire to compete again

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Usain Bolt was steadfast. Now is the right time to retire.

The 30-year-old said he did not race one year too many. He feels no need to compete again, to continue on and end his career with a victory.

“No, I think I’ve seen too many people retire and come back into the sport to really make it worse or to shame themselves,” Bolt said Sunday at the 2012 Olympic Stadium, where he came for one final lap of honor on the last day of the 10-day meet. “I personally won’t be one of those persons to come back.”

The eight-time Olympic champion can live with losing his last two races — to polarizing rival Justin Gatlin in the 100m at worlds in London on Aug. 5 — and tumbling to the track in the 4x100m relay on Saturday.

“I don’t think one championship is going to change what I’ve done,” he said. “I remember, after losing the 100m, someone said to me, ‘Usain, don’t worry, Muhammad Ali lost his last fight also.'”

Bolt said he would have an MRI on Monday to assess what he called a “pulled hamstring” that bit him about 15 strides into his relay anchor leg Saturday.

It’s certainly a different ending than what could have been. Bolt left the Olympic stage on top in Rio, sweeping the sprints and kissing the track rather than lying on it face down in pain.

In hindsight, should Bolt have retired one year ago?

“No, I’m fine,” he said. “As I’ve told you, my fans, they wanted to see me one more year. I told you guys, this was about my fans. … If I could come out here and give the fans a show, no matter how it ended, for me, I’m happy.”

Bolt’s immediate future?

“Party,” he said. “I need to go out and have a drink.”

In the following months and years could come more headlines about Bolt dabbling in soccer. Maybe a family.

“Hopefully three kids,” by 20 years from now, he said, adding that he wouldn’t force them into track and field.

Months before these worlds, Bolt wondered if the farewell would move him to tears. He had never cried at a track meet.

“I think I almost cried,” Bolt said. “It was close, but they [tears] didn’t come. I was just saying goodbye.”

That doesn’t mean it was not emotional.

“It’s just really sad that I have to walk away now,” he said.

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MORE: U.S. ties world championships medal record

Usain Bolt says goodbye to track fans

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Usain Bolt’s final world championship race did not go as planned. But he had another opportunity to say goodbye to his fans.

Bolt, who fell to the track with a hamstring cramp in Saturday’s 4x100m final, returned to the London Stadium on Sunday and walked a lap of honor in front of 60,000 screaming fans. His world record times, 9.58 seconds in the 100m and 19.19 seconds in the 200m, were displayed on the video scoreboards.

London Mayor Sadiq Khan presented Bolt with a large piece of the track from the 2012 Olympics. Bolt swept the 100m, 200m and 4x100m gold medals at the London Games.

Bolt did not leave any room for interpretation when asked whether he planned on returning to the track:

Bolt ends his decorated career with 14 career world championship medals, which is tied with retired Jamaican sprinter Merlene Ottey for second all-time behind U.S. sprinter Allyson Felix. No athlete has more than Bolt’s 11 world championship gold medals.

He also has eight Olympic gold medals.

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MORE: Usain Bolt falls with injury, loses final career race at worlds (video)