Boston Marathon winner has run 80 marathons, half marathon as panda

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They call him “Citizen Runner.”

Yuki Kawauchi, the shock winner of the Boston Marathon and first Japanese to do so since 1987, was best known before Monday for owning the world record of 78 marathons run under 2 hours, 20 minutes.

Now that record is 79. Kawauchi overcame 2017 Boston winner Geoffrey Kirui of Kenya in the final two miles, clocking 2:15:58 and winning by 2:25 in a downpour, temperatures in the 30s and a headwind.

“For me, it’s the best conditions possible [today],” Kawauchi said through a translator, who added that Kawauchi was on the verge of blacking out and needed to get to the medical tent.

It was the slowest winning time since 1976, but Kawauchi beat a field that included the last three Boston winners, plus Olympic marathon bronze medalist Galen Rupp.

Rupp dropped out before the 20th mile and was treated in a medical tent for more than an hour for symptoms of asthma and hypothermia, a member of his agency said, according to the Oregonian.

BOSTON MARATHON: Results | Finish-Line Camera

Kawauchi has run four marathons this year, including one in 2:18:59 on New Year’s Day in Marshfield, Mass., in single-digit temperatures, believed to be the fastest marathon in weather that cold.

The 31-year-old ran 12 marathons in 2017, winning five of them. Records show he has run at least 81 marathons since his debut in 2009.

“I run a lot of races because I love to run races,” said Kawauchi, who trains by himself. “Racing a lot gives me the opportunity to travel the world.”

Kawauchi was dubbed Japan’s “Citizen Runner” several years ago because he competed while holding a full-time job in his local government. He is now a high school administrator kept busy by writing its 100th anniversary commemorative magazine.

Though Kawauchi has won more than 30 marathons, his best finish in a major before Monday was third in Tokyo in 2011.

In a Boston warm-up race, Kawauchi finished second in a half marathon while wearing a full-length panda costume on March 25, according to Japan Running News.

“I think there’s probably not a single person in Boston who thought I was going to win,” he said.

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MORE: Shalane Flanagan makes pit stop mid-marathon

Desi Linden is first U.S. woman to win Boston Marathon since 1985

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It was never Desi Linden‘s day.

Not at the California high school state championships, which she never won. Not at Arizona State, where her best NCAA Championships result was 10th. As a professional, Linden had already far exceeded expectations with a pair of Olympic Trials runners-up and a second-place finish at the 2011 Boston Marathon (two seconds behind the winner). But she never broke the tape at a major race.

Then came Monday, the most dreadful Boston Marathon weather in at least 30 years. High 30s at the Hopkinton start. Headwinds of 20 mph. A downpour. “Hypothermia is the key here,” race director Dave McGillivray said on the local TV broadcast.

“Honestly, at mile 2, 3, 4, I didn’t feel like I was even making it to the finish line,” Linden, 34, said. She wasn’t alone.

But this was Linden’s day.

The 5-foot-2, self-described (and labeled by many others) “grinder,” book nerd and Scottish whiskey connoisseur became the first U.S. female runner to win the world’s oldest annual marathon in 33 years. The first in the professional era, since prize money was first awarded and the elite international fields became dominated by East Africans.

Linden clocked 2:39:54 (slowest winning time since 1978, that weather), crossing 4:10 ahead of unknown American Sarah Sellers, who paid a $185 entry fee and was one of two nurses to finish in the top five. Sellers was a surprise, as was men’s winner Yuki Kawauchi (more on the Japanese here), but as others said, Linden was built for this thinking-person’s race and these conditions.

“I know I’m biased when I say this, but I always feel like she’s the smartest, racer, tactician, whatever you want to call it,” Kevin Hanson, who coaches Linden in Michigan, told media afterward. “Mother Nature threw the big dilemma at everybody, which means that there was a whole additional amount of thinking that had to take place.”

BOSTON MARATHON: Results | Finish-Line Camera

Linden’s thoughts in the first few miles were of quitting. She said as much to Massachusetts native Shalane Flanagan, who on Nov. 5 became the first U.S. female runner to win the New York City Marathon in 40 years. Flanagan finished seventh on Monday in what she expected to be her last Boston Marathon.

“Des came up to me around mile 6 and said, hey, it’s not going to be my day, I think I’m going to drop out,” Flanagan recalled. Flanagan grabbed her rival’s shoulder. Linden continued, “If there’s anything I can do to help you, just let me know.”

“OK, this is weird,” the four-time Olympian Flanagan thought. “I was waiting for her, any second, to drop out.”

A half-hour passed. Linden was still with Flanagan and the leaders at mile 12 or 13. So Flanagan took Linden up on the offer and told her that she needed to stop at an upcoming port-a-potty. Flanagan didn’t say it, but she hoped Linden would look out for her on the return and help pace her back to the pack.

“I was like, basically, asking her like she was my mom,” Flanagan said. “Do you think I can go to the bathroom? She was like, yeah, I got you. I think you’ve got enough time. We’re running slow enough, it’s fine.”

Flanagan veered right and into the second portable bathroom. She spent 14 seconds inside — timed by LetsRun’s Jonathan Gault — and emerged on the wet pavement. Linden drifted to the caboose of the jacketed group of eight, repeatedly looking back for Flanagan.

Linden helped Flanagan to the group. Then she helped Molly Huddle reconnect, too. The two-time Olympian Huddle was, along with Flanagan, Jordan Hasay and Linden, one of four U.S. women who came to Boston with realistic chances of ending the 33-year drought.

Linden received the least pre-race press of the four. Flanagan was coming off her NYC title. Huddle broke the American record in the half marathon in January. Hasay became the second-fastest U.S. female marathoner ever at her last outing in Chicago on Oct. 8 but dropped out of Monday’s race on Sunday night with a heel injury.

Linden chose not to race a fall marathon, then produced her slowest career 13.1-mile time in 17 half marathons in her Boston prep race. That came in 29 degrees on a new course and into a headwind, though.

When Hanson saw the Patriots’ Day forecast, “I thought her chances of victory increased 10-fold,” he said. “She just embraced the weather when other people said we’re going to try to pretend it’s not going on.”

Soon after helping Huddle (who would finish 16th before a Tuesday root canal), Linden found herself in third or fourth place. Linden, who graduated from Arizona State with degrees in religious studies and psychology, did some more thinking.

“And thought I probably shouldn’t drop out,” she said, to press-conference laughter, “so I kept going.”

Ethiopian Mamitu Daska, 34 like Linden and third in New York last fall, moved in the 14th mile. Linden dropped about 30 seconds back with 2017 Boston winner Edna Kiplagat and another Kenyan, Gladys Chesir.

Linden, so tactically proficient that she ran identical 13.1-mile splits in Boston last year (fourth place), was pretty solid this year — 1:19:42 for the first half, 1:20:12 for the second.

The others faded. Linden went from third to first in the 22nd mile. By the turn onto Boylston Street, she led by four minutes. She dared not look back, though.

“2011 put the fear in me,” Linden said.

Of all of Linden’s near misses in major races, the 2011 Boston Marathon stuck with her. She lost a sprint to Kenyan Caroline Kilel by two seconds. That fall and spring was Linden’s coming out.

Desi Davila, before she married pro runner and triathlete Ryan Linden, ran a personal best by five minutes at the October 2010 Chicago Marathon and finished second. Then she ran nearly four minutes faster than that in Boston six months later.

This for a woman who didn’t break 16 minutes for 5000m in college and ran 2:44:56 in her marathon debut in Boston in 2007. She was 18th then. Monday marked the 11th anniversary.

“In 2007, no one believed I would be sitting here, that’s for sure,” Linden said at Monday’s winners’ press conference, gold wreath resting on her head. “The [Boston Athletic Association] treated us like rock stars. They came in, showed us their history and museum. Hey, these are so-and-so’s shoes. You could have your stuff in here one day. They just treated us like we belonged. That made me want to be a marathoner.”

Linden, in a black-and-lime green jacket with a No. 8 bib pinned on its side, raised her arms in her final strides. She blew a kiss with her black gloves just before crossing the blue tape. She was enveloped by an American flag and loved ones.

“It hurts right now,” she said in a finish-line TV interview, “but it’s a perfect day for me.”

The World Marathon Majors season continues with the London Marathon on Sunday, live at 3:30 a.m. ET on NBCSN and NBC Sports Gold.

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MORE: Boston winner has run 80 marathons, half marathon as panda

Japanese runner clocks 76th sub-2:20 marathon in frigid temps

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Japan’s Yuki Kawauchi reportedly broke the world record for most sub-2:20 marathons by winning a 26.2-mile race in Massachusetts on Monday in single-digit temperatures.

Kawauchi, 30, ran his 76th marathon under 2:20 in winning the Marshfield Marathon in 2:18:59 wearing full-body tights. American Doug Kurtis ran sub-2:20 a total of 75 times.

It may have also been the fastest marathon in weather that cold.

“At 5 km [3.1 miles] I was already all alone and so cold that I couldn’t move my legs,” Kawauchi said, according to Japan Running News. “When I saw my 5 km split it was the first time in a race I’ve ever thought, ‘Why am I doing this?’

“After this I think I could do pretty well going after the Antarctica record.”

Kawauchi was dubbed Japan’s “Citizen Runner” several years ago because he worked a full-time job in his local government.

He debuted in the marathon in 2009, which means he has averaged eight sub-2:20 marathons per year.

He has never competed at the Olympics but is certainly fast enough to make Japan’s team. He was ninth at the world championships in London on Aug. 6 and sixth at the 2015 New York City Marathon.

Kawauchi is entered in the Boston Marathon on April 18.

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