Getty Images

Aly Raisman’s advice from David Ortiz after pre-Olympic injury

Leave a comment

It’s Christmas Eve 2015, and Aly Raisman is — where else — at Boston Red Sox slugger David Ortiz‘s house.

She’s also sporting a black walking boot.

Raisman said in her book, “Fierce,” published Tuesday, that she partially tore left ankle ligaments warming up on floor exercise at a December 2015 national team camp.

Raisman thought about quitting gymnastics during that camp, not only for that injury but also because she was brought to tears — two days before getting hurt — believing that she wouldn’t make the Olympic team named in seven months.

Raisman was told by a doctor to keep pressure off the ankle for four weeks.

Later that month, she arrived at Ortiz’s house for a Christmas Eve small group gathering. Raisman and Ortiz had been friends since she threw a ceremonial first pitch at an August 2012 Red Sox game.

Ortiz asked how she was doing wearing that boot.

“I just don’t feel confident anymore,” she said. “There are all these younger girls coming up, and they’re all better than me.”

Ortiz, then a 40-year-old going into his final MLB season, nodded and offered advice.

“You have to use the moment and not let it use you,” he said.

Seven months later, Raisman made her second Olympic team. A month after that, she won another Olympic gold and two silvers, giving her six career Olympic medals.

Raisman plans to return for a Tokyo 2020 run.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: How Raisman addressed Larry Nassar in book

‘The Freeze’ recruited for Winter Olympic sport

Getty Images
Leave a comment

“The Freeze” on ice? USA Bobsled and Skeleton wants to see it.

Nigel Talton, aka “Beat the Freeze” from Atlanta Braves in-game promotions, took part in a USA Bobsled and Skeleton off-ice camp in the summer and will be invited back for a November camp to get on a skeleton sled, according to TeamUSA.org.

“If I have the chance to make (an Olympic team) it will be great, but for right now I’m just getting my feet wet, getting a foot in the door and learning the sport,” Talton said, according to the website.

Talton became a viral sensation in June, after he came back to beat a showboating fan in a race at SunTrust Park.

That kind of speed lends itself to bobsled, where Olympic track stars Lauryn Williams and Lolo Jones transitioned to make the Sochi Winter Games.

Through NBC Sports’ Lewis Johnson, who covers track and bobsled and skeleton, USA Bobsled and Skeleton got into contact with Talton and brought him in for the summer camp, according to the report.

“He did really well on the testing, which was not a surprise because we knew he was fast, but with his weight and his size there were some issues with bobsled, because he’s a smaller guy,” USA Bobsled and Skeleton coach and recruiter Mike Dionne said, according to TeamUSA.org. “But it reaffirmed what we thought, that skeleton would be more suitable for Nigel, so we’re going to invite him back to camp in November and get him on a sled.”

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: PyeongChang Olympic hockey schedule released

MLB commissioner ‘can’t imagine’ best baseball players in Olympics

Jake Arrieta
Getty Images
Leave a comment

MIAMI (AP) — MLB commissioner Rob Manfred has repeated the sport’s opposition to having top major leaguers play at the Tokyo Olympics.

The 2020 Games are scheduled for July 24 to Aug. 9, and Major League Baseball has repeatedly said it will not interrupt its season.

The World Baseball Classic, co-owned by MLB and the Major League Baseball Players Association, has been the sport’s alternative.

“I can’t imagine a situation where we would take the kind of break that would be necessary to have our best players in the Olympics,” Manfred said Monday during an All-Star Game town hall meeting. “As a result of that, we feel the WBC is crucial as a substitute, a premiere international tournament that allows our players to play for their countries.”

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Some 2020 Olympic baseball, softball games set 150 miles from Tokyo