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Two athletes may vie for Winter Olympic medal record in PyeongChang

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Marit Bjørgen knows that she can break the record for career Winter Olympic medals and gold medals in PyeongChang.

She’s also aware that the current record holder could add to his tally, too.

A pair of Norwegian legends will compete in their final Olympics and compete against each other, but not in the same events, in February.

Bjørgen, a 37-year-old cross-country skier and mother, has won 10 medals, including six golds, among the last four Winter Games. She is already the most decorated woman in Winter Olympic history.

Bjørgen is three medals (and two golds) shy of the overall Winter Olympic medal record. That’s held by Norwegian biathlete Ole Einar Bjørndalen, a 43-year-old who is expected to race in his seventh Winter Games.

Cross-country skiing and biathlon are two sports where athletes can rack up several medals throughout the 16 days of the Games, both individually and in relays.

Bjørgen said it’s a dream — but not a goal — and certainly motivation to try and pass Bjørndalen’s record in PyeongChang, according to Norwegian newspaper Verdens Gang (VG).

Bjørndalen snatched the title in Sochi, passing another Norwegian, retired cross-country skier Bjørn Dæhlie, by one total medal and tying Dæhlie’s record for golds.

Incredibly, Bjørgen could be favored to pass Bjørndalen in five months, a little more than two years after giving birth to son Marius.

She returned to competition last season and dominated the world championships, winning three of the four individual events and anchoring Norway’s winning relay team.

Bjørndalen earned one medal at the 2017 World Biathlon Championships — a bronze.

If Bjørgen and Bjørndalen repeat those medal takeaways in PyeongChang, Bjørgen will tie Bjørndalen in total medals and pass him in golds by two to become the most decorated Winter Olympian in history.

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Susan Dunklee’s historic silver caps incredible biathlon worlds for U.S.

Susan Dunklee
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Susan Dunklee capped the U.S.’ best-ever biathlon world championships by becoming the first American woman to take an individual medal, a silver, at an Olympics or worlds on Sunday.

Dunklee also became the first woman in any sport to qualify for the U.S. Olympic team and the second overall. Lowell Bailey previously qualified after winning the first U.S. Olympic or world biathlon gold medal on Thursday.

“It’s a dream come true,” said Dunklee, a 31-year-old who raced at the Sochi Olympics. “We’ve believed in the U.S. that we can get these world championships medals in the past. A [U.S.] woman winning a world championships medal is a really big thing.”

Dunklee missed gold by 4.6 seconds in the 12.5km mass start, clocking 33 minutes, 18.4 seconds in Hochfilzen, Austria, on Sunday.

German Laura Dahlmeier took gold for the fifth time in six races at worlds. Dahlmeier has now earned medals in all 11 world championships races she has entered the last two years.

Dunklee led Dahlmeier after each of the four shooting stages — both shot clean — but Dahlmeier erased a 5.1-second deficit in the final 2.5km skiing loop.

“Oh my gosh, we’ve never had anything like this,” Dunklee, the daughter of two University of Vermont cross-country skiers, told Dahlmeier as they waited for the podium ceremony. “It’s so cool.”

Dunklee has never won a World Cup race but did finish third and fourth this season, plus sixth in the worlds 15km individual last week.

Her fifth-place finish from the 2012 World Championships was previously the best individual result for a U.S. woman. The U.S. women’s relay team took bronze in 1984.

Dunklee earned her first World Cup podium one month after the Sochi Olympics, a third place, the first time an American woman made a top-level international podium since 1990.

The success of Bailey and Dunklee gives the U.S. hope that it can win its first Olympic biathlon medal in PyeongChang. Biathlon is the only Winter Olympic sport where the U.S. has yet to earn an Olympic medal. Its best finish was sixth in the 1972 men’s relay. Its best individual finish was Bailey’s eighth in the 20km individual in 2014.

Between Bailey and Dunklee, the Americans picked up six finishes at worlds that were better than their best-ever individual Olympic finish.

“We believed that we can get a gold someday, and Lowell did that this week,” Dunklee said. “We just have all this positive momentum going right now.”

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Lowell Bailey wins first U.S. biathlon world title, qualifies for Olympic team

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The U.S. has its first world biathlon champion. It’s Lowell Bailey, a 35-year-old who nearly retired a year ago to become a cattle farmer.

Bailey became the first athlete in any sport to qualify for the 2018 U.S. Olympic team by winning the 20km individual race at the world championships in Hochfilzen, Austria, on Thursday.

“It’s a dream come true,” Bailey said in a podium interview, standing with wife Erika and 8-month-old daughter Ophelia, adding later at a press conference, “I am waiting for someone to wake me up.”

Bailey will compete in his fourth Olympics in PyeongChang, but first he can soak up history in Hochfilzen.

Starting No. 100 of 102 entrants, he was one of three to complete the 20km event hitting 20 of 20 shots. He edged Czech Ondrej Moravec by 3.3 seconds for gold after 48 minutes on course. France’s Martin Fourcade, arguably the most dominant athlete in any winter sport at the moment, took bronze.

“I know how important and good it is for biathlon to have some people outside of Europe winning,” Fourcade said. “I couldn’t be more satisfied about another guy winning today.”

Before Thursday, biathlon was the only Winter Olympic sport where the U.S. had yet to win an Olympic or world title. Biathlon has been part of the Olympic program since 1960. Its world championships have been held since 1958.

Before this year, Bailey’s previous best Olympic or worlds finish was eighth. A little more than one year ago, he had it all planned out that the 2015-16 season would be his last:

For his final world championships to be in Oslo, one of the iconic biathlon venues, in 2016. His wife was pregnant. Bailey would return from Europe. They would continue the tradition of his wife’s farming family, which had for nearly 30 years grown seed potatoes and then a herd of more than 100 bison in Upstate New York.

“We were going to start with raising cattle, because when we ran the numbers it just looked like we can actually make a profit,” Bailey said. “Bison are incredibly dangerous and a very risky business. Our plan was to start a cattle business and become beef producers.”

Plans changed late last season.

Bailey received a call from what was described to him as “a fledgling non-profit” in Bozeman, Montana, looking to build a world-class biathlon center for the western United States. They offered him a job — “I didn’t know that jobs like this exist,” Bailey said — and wanted him to continue competing through the 2018 Olympics while helping fundraise on the side.

“Erika and I thought it over,” he said. “We decided to give it a shot.”

Bailey’s early season was nothing too out of his usual results. His top individual World Cup finish was ninth going into worlds.

But he felt confident after skipping a World Cup in early January, giving him an extra week off during the holidays. Plus, the presence of his baby daughter and the feeling of being “part of something bigger.”

In Hochfilzen, Bailey finished fourth in the 10km sprint and sixth in the 12.5km pursuit before his gold on Thursday. An incredible showing given the U.S. has earned three total biathlon medals in the history of the Olympics and world championships — two silvers and one bronze, all at worlds.

Bailey left the fourth and final shooting stop on Thursday 6.4 seconds faster than the time of Moravec, who had gone about 25 minutes earlier. Bailey had one more 4km loop left to ski, which would take about nine minutes.

“The last loop felt like it was 40 kilometers long and not four kilometers long,” Bailey said. “I was fortunate that I was one of the last starters because I knew where Ondrej’s split times were, so I had every member of our staff screaming their heads off at me.”

The lead was cut to one tenth of a second at the last split with 1.1km to go. With 800 meters left, Bailey remembered a U.S. ski technician running alongside the course, telling him, “Now you’re even.”

“If there was ever a time to find this extra something, this is it,” Bailey thought to himself, that six-second advantage gone. “I tried to stay calm, because with ski technique you can flail and expend a lot of energy and not go anywhere.

“I willed myself to get to the finish as fast as I could.”

As Bailey circled that final loop, he thought back to Sunday, when he was in second place after the last shooting stage in the pursuit and faded to sixth skiing to the finish line.

“Watching the medal go away from me, I replayed this last loop in my head probably 1,000 times the last three days,” Bailey said. “I just told myself if I ever have that chance again, that I can’t let that medal go away. So I kept saying that in the last loop today.”

He reached the finish on Sunday a champion. U.S. high-performance director Bernd Eisenbichler emerged and grabbed him by the cheeks. Bailey screamed. And fell to his knees. And screamed. And screamed.

Bailey leaned over, caught his breath and heard his name on the loud speakers. Then he exchanged a handshake with Max Cobb, the president and CEO of US Biathlon, standing behind a barrier.

“This medal belongs to not only me, but I can think of at least 30 or 40 individuals,” Bailey said.

Another American, Susan Dunklee, is set to join Bailey in qualifying for the Olympic team following the completion of world championships races on Sunday.

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