U.S. women’s eight 11-year winning streak ends at World Rowing Championships

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The U.S. women’s eight team ended their 11-year winning streak with a fourth-place finish at the World Rowing Championships, which wrapped up today.

For over a decade, the squad has gone undefeated at the major international championships, winning three Olympic titles (2016, 2012, 2008) and eight world championship gold medals from 2006 to 2015.

At the 2017 World Championships held in Sarasota, Florida, however, the home country’s boat crossed the finish line behind new champions Romania, as well as silver and bronze medalists Canada and New Zealand. The U.S. team’s time of 6:09:250 was nearly three seconds behind Romania’s winning time of 6:06.400

It was also far slower than the world record time of 05:54.160, which the U.S. women’s eight set in 2013.

Only three members of the current lineup, which consists of eight rowers and one coxswain, were part of that 2013 team. The same three, Katelin Guregian, Emily Regan and Lauren Schmetterling, are also the only members who were on the gold-medal-winning squad at the 2016 Rio Olympics.

The U.S. picked up two silver medals in other events on the last day of the World Championships.

Meghan O’Leary and Ellen Tomek finished second in the women’s double sculls, which is the U.S.’s highest-ever finish in the event at a world championships. The oldest crew in the event, O’Leary and Tomek placed behind gold-medalists New Zealand, with Australia following to claim the bronze medal.

The U.S. men’s eight also earned a silver medal, while the world record holders from Germany lead the entire race en route to winning gold. It was the first world championship medal for a U.S. men’s boat since 2014.

The men’s eight has been coached this season by Mike Teti, who led the U.S. team to gold at the 2004 Athens Olympics. Before today’s race, he told Team USA of his young squad, “I think all the boats have undergraduates in them and some recent [college] graduates. It’s a good baseline to start the quadrennial with. I think the team will improve over the next three years.”

Dariush Aghai, a member of the team, told World Rowing after the race, “Feels great to medal today, got a great bunch of people here. We’ve only been together a short time as well. The last 500m I just zoned in to our cox and we managed a sprint.”

Overall, Italy won the medal table with nine total medals: three gold, three silver and three bronze. Rounding out the top three was New Zealand with seven and Australia with six medals.

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World Rowing Championships broadcast schedule

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The U.S. hosts the world rowing championships for the first time since 1994, live on NBC Sports next week.

NBCSN, Olympic Channel: Home of Team USA and the NBC Sports app will combine to air daily coverage of the semifinals and finals starting Thursday in Sarasota, Fla.

All NBCSN and Olympic Channel coverage will stream on NBCSports.com/live and the NBC Sports app.

Competition begins Sunday with preliminary heats. A detailed schedule and start lists and results are available on worldrowing.com.

The U.S. earned two medals in Rio. Its dominant women’s eight took its third straight Olympic title. A new-look boat eyes a ninth straight world championships gold medal (heats Tuesday, final Oct. 1).

Three of the nine women return from Rio, led by coxswain Katelin Guregian. Five others are taking the year off or have retired. The last, Amanda Elmore, is out due to injury.

The U.S. put a priority on other women’s boats as it begins ramping up for Tokyo 2020.

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Day Time (ET) Network
Thursday, Sept. 28 10:05 a.m.-12:50 p.m. Olympic Channel
Friday, Sept. 29 11 a.m.-2:20 p.m. Olympic Channel
10:30-11:30 p.m. NBCSN*
Saturday, Sept. 30 9:50 a.m.-12:20 p.m. Olympic Channel
Sunday, Oct. 1 9:30 a.m.12:30 p.m. Olympic Channel
11 p.m.-12 a.m. NBCSN*

*Same-day delay

British Olympic legends receive knighthoods, damehoods

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LONDON (AP) — Andy Murray received a knighthood in Queen Elizabeth II‘s New Year’s Honors list on Friday, recognition from the monarch for reaching the pinnacle of tennis by winning his second Wimbledon and Olympic titles on his way to topping the rankings.

The 29-year-old Murray was previously named an Officer of the Order of the British Empire, or OBE, in 2012 after becoming Olympic champion for the first time.

Joining Murray in being knighted in British sports is Mo Farah, who retained his Olympic 5000m and 10,000m titles in Rio, becoming the first British track and field athlete to win four Olympic gold medals.

“I’m so happy to be awarded this incredible honor from the country that has been my home since I moved here at the age of eight,” Farah said Friday. “Looking back at the boy who arrived here from Somalia, not speaking any English, I could never have imagined where I would be today — it’s a dream come true.

“I’m so proud to have had the opportunity to race for my country and win gold medals for the British people, who have been my biggest supporters throughout my career.”

Lee Pearson, who won his 11th Paralympic gold in equestrian in Rio, was also knighted. He already held the MBE, OBE and CBE for services to equestrianism and to disabled sport.

Damehoods went to heptathlete Jessica Ennis-Hill and rower Katherine Grainger, who both retired from competitive action following the Rio Olympics.

Ennis-Hill added silver in Rio to her gold at London, as did Grainger, who came out of retirement to compete in the double sculls alongside Vicky Thornley.

Knights are addressed as “Sir” or “Dame.” Recipients of the other honors have no title, but can put the letters after their names. The ranks for the Orders of the British Empire are Commander, Officer and Member, in descending order.

Britain’s honors are bestowed by the monarch, but recipients are selected by committees of civil servants from nominations made by the government and the public.

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