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Takeaways from World Short Track Speed Skating Championships

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Three thoughts off the weekend’s World Short Track Speed Skating Championships …

1. Elise Christie is one of the great athlete stories for PyeongChang

The Briton won the 1000m and 1500m and finished third in the 3000m last weekend to become the first European woman to bag the world overall title. It marked the peak of a decade-long ascent for the two-time Olympian who was a figure skater until age 15.

Christie had a nightmare Sochi Olympics. She was disqualified from the 500m final (colliding with another skater), disqualified from the 1000m semifinals (colliding with another skater) and disqualified from the 1500m opening round (finishing too far inside).

Christie was cyberbullied as well, reportedly by South Korean accounts upset that her collision in the 500m final wiped out Park Seung-Hi‘s shot at gold. Christie’s Twitter account was temporarily deactivated.

“It took me about two years to get over what happened in Sochi, not just the outcome but also the repercussions after what people had said,” Christie said on the BBC on Tuesday. “I lost a lot of self-confidence as a person, outside of sport, but obviously I’ve learned to live with who I am now.”

She rebounded at the world championships, winning one medal in March 2014, then two in 2015 and three in 2016, plus the overall bronze.

Christie won multiple races at World Cup stops in Shanghai and the 2018 Olympic venue of Gangneung, South Korea, in December (saying she was received warmly by South Koreans in Gangneung). But she suffered a concussion in January, knocking her out of February’s World Cups.

Christie said she lost vision in her left eye with numbness all down the left side of her face. She experienced headaches and wasn’t able to sleep properly.

Yet in Rotterdam, Christie was superb. In the 1000m in particular, passing two South Koreans with two laps left in her semifinal and then making passes on three of the last four laps to win the final.

“World champion overall has always been my dream goal,” Christie told the BBC. “The Olympic goal is obviously a dream, but this is more because you have to be consistent. You have to get everything right again and again and again.”

An Olympic gold in PyeongChang “would make everything from Sochi just disappear,” she said.

2. South Korean men rise up, women suffer misfortune

Of South Korea’s 53 Winter Olympic medals, 42 have come in short track speed skating. South Koreans have won twice as many Olympic short track golds than any other country.

So the world championships, one year before South Korea hosts its first Winter Olympics, were huge.

The South Korean men came through, unlike the Sochi Winter Games, where they went medal-less for the first time in Olympic history.

Seo Yi-Ra won South Korea’s first overall world title in four years, ending its longest stretch between men’s overall titles since the Koreans came to prominence 25 years ago. Sin Da-Woon, part of that desultory effort in Sochi, added the 1500m gold. South Korea earned at least one medal in all four individual men’s races in Rotterdam.

The South Korean women were not successful. Stunning considering Shim Suk-Hee and Choi Min-Jeong combined to win the last three overall world titles. Shim, a triple 2014 Olympic medalist who changed the last four digits of her phone number to 2018, salvaged the team’s effort by winning the final individual race, the 3000m, in Rotterdam.

Choi, 18, was bidding for her third straight overall title but came home with no medals. It was largely as a result of bad luck. She crashed in the 1500m final and the 500m semis, with other skaters at least partially to blame. In the 1000m, Choi was passed for the lead by Christie on the final lap and appeared to have silver wrapped up, but was disqualified.

The South Koreans can take solace in the fact that Russian Viktor Ahn, the former South Korean Ahn Hyun-Soo, struggled in Rotterdam. Ahn, who was .077 away from sweeping the Sochi Olympic golds, earned just one medal over the weekend, a bronze in the 3000m. Ahn was not a factor in the 1500m and 500m finals and was eliminated in the 1000m quarterfinals after taking last season off.

3. U.S. struggles

Only one U.S. skater qualified for a final — three-time Olympic medalist J.R. Celski, who was eighth in the 1500m. The U.S. went medal-less at a third straight worlds, its longest drought in at least 20 years. This comes after the U.S. earned no individual medals at the Olympics for the second time in the sport’s short Olympic history (since 1992).

The U.S. program has descended since Apolo Ohno‘s last Olympics in 2010. Its headlines since have centered on skate-tampering and coaching-abuse scandals.

But there is a bit of a silver lining heading into the Olympic season.

Celski, the biggest U.S. star, could still be finding his form after significant knee and hip injuries. Katherine Reutter, a 2010 Olympic medalist and 2011 World champion, showed promising signs making World Cup finals this season after a three-year retirement. But Reutter missed worlds after a concussion earlier in the winter.

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MORE: One year out: PyeongChang Olympic storylines

Winter Olympic medalists Apolo Ohno, Tanith White join NBC’s Rio team

Apolo Ohno, Tanith White
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Apolo Ohno, the most decorated U.S. Winter Olympian with eight medals, and 2006 Olympic silver medalist Tanith White will serve as NBC sportsdesk reporters at the Rio Games.

Ohno, a short track speed skating Olympian in 2002, 2006 and 2010, will cover his third straight Olympics for NBC. He served as a sportsdesk reporter at London 2012 and as a short track analyst at Sochi 2014.

White, an ice dance Olympian in 2006 and 2010, will cover her second straight Olympics for NBC. She was a sportsdesk reporter at Sochi 2014.

Ohno and White will report at various venues and locations and contribute to features on multiple platforms in Rio, including on “The Olympic Zone” – a 30-minute nightly show on NBC affiliates.

Fellow Winter Olympians Tara Lipinski and Johnny Weir will also cover the Rio Games for NBC, exploring the culture, sights and sounds and fashion of the host city.

MORE: Mike Tirico joins NBC with Olympics at ‘top of the list’

Apolo Ohno to be inducted into U.S. Speedskating Hall of Fame

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Apolo Ohno, the most decorated U.S. Winter Olympian with eight medals, will be inducted into the U.S. Speedskating Hall of Fame on May 13.

“This incredible sport has taught me so much, and to be associated with a special group of legends like this is something that I will cherish for the rest of my life,” Ohno said in a press release.

Ohno earned gold and silver at Salt Lake City 2002, gold and two bronze at Torino 2006 and silver and two bronze at Vancouver 2010, his final competition.

Ohno announced his retirement in 2013 at age 30 and has since worked as an analyst for NBC Olympics while also starting the Apolo Ohno Invitational short track competition.

Ohno completed the 2014 Ironman World Championships in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, in 9 hours, 52 minutes, 27 seconds.

He swam 2.4 miles (1:00:29), biked 112 miles (5:07:15) and ran a marathon (3:36:41) back to back to back. He finished within an hour of the women’s elite winner.

Ohno’s time was much faster than a pair of celebrities from the 2013 Ironman — former NFL wide receiver Hines Ward (13:08:15) and chef Gordon Ramsay (14:04:08).

MORE: Ohno talks Ironman, Olympic comparisons, Pyeongchang 2018