SOCHI, RUSSIA - FEBRUARY 15:  Gold medalist Alexander Tretiakov of Russia celebrates during the flower ceremony for the Men's Skeleton on Day 8 of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at Sliding Center Sanki on February 15, 2014 in Sochi, Russia.  (Photo by Alex Livesey/Getty Images)
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Russian skeleton medalists’ ban lifted after appeal

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A ban of Russia’s top skeleton athletes has been lifted due to a lack of evidence from a recent World Anti-Doping Agency-commissioned report on widespread Russian doping.

On Dec. 30, Russia’s two Sochi Olympic skeleton medalists, including gold medalist Aleksandr Tretiyakov, were among four Russian sliders provisionally suspended through Jan. 19 in response to the investigation into Russian doping at the Sochi Winter Games.

The four skeleton athletes appealed the ban and had a hearing in front of a panel last Tuesday.

On Sunday, the International Bobsled and Skeleton Federation said the panel ruled that the WADA-commissioned Russian doping report “provides sufficient reason to conduct further investigation by both the IOC and the IBSF into the role of the athletes in ‘tampering or attempted tampering of any doping control’ … but at the same time it comes to the conclusion that at this very moment there is not (yet) sufficient evidence against the athletes that would justify the provisional suspension.”

In the five days between the hearing and the bans being lifted, the Russian sliders were forced to miss a World Cup stop in Altenberg, Germany.

They are able to compete at next weekend’s World Cup in Winterberg, Germany, which doubles as the European Championships.

Tretiyakov, Sochi women’s bronze medalist Yelena Nikitina and fellow Sochi Olympians Maria Orlova and Olga Potylitsina were all suspended. They made up two-thirds of the Russian Olympic skeleton team in Sochi but have not received sanctions regarding their 2014 Olympic results.

At least 10 Russian Olympians from Sochi were provisionally suspended since the second part of a WADA-commissioned report into Russian doping violations in Sochi was published Dec. 9.

The other six suspended Sochi Olympians known so far were cross-country skiers, including Russia’s top two skiers from those Winter Games.

Two Russian biathletes were also suspended in connection to the WADA-commissioned report. Though their names haven’t been announced by national or international governing bodies, Russian and Italian media have said they were Sochi Olympians.

The skiers and biathletes, like the skeleton sliders, have not received sanctions regarding their Olympic results.

On Dec. 23, the IOC said it opened disciplinary proceedings against 28 Russian Olympians for whom there was “evidence of manipulation of one or more of their urine samples” from the Sochi Winter Games.

The IOC move was in response to the WADA-commissioned report by Richard McLaren that said more than 1,000 Russian athletes were involved in organized doping. Russians who won 15 medals in Sochi had their samples tampered with, according to the report.

This year’s world skeleton championships are in Koenigssee, Germany, in February, after they were moved from Sochi after the McLaren report was published.

MORE: Katie Uhlaender, fourth in Sochi, contacts Russian skeleton bronze medalist

Russian Olympic skeleton champion suspended after Sochi doping report

SOCHI, RUSSIA - FEBRUARY 15:  Gold medalist Alexander Tretiakov of Russia celebrates after winning the Men's Skeleton on Day 8 of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at Sliding Center Sanki on February 15, 2014 in Sochi, Russia.  (Photo by Alex Livesey/Getty Images)
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Russia’s two Sochi Olympic skeleton medalists, including gold medalist Aleksandr Tretiyakov, were provisionally suspended through Jan. 19 in response to the investigation into Russian doping at the Sochi Winter Games, according to Russian media citing the Russian bobsled and skeleton federation.

Tretiyakov, women’s bronze medalist Yelena Nikitina and fellow Sochi Olympic skeleton sliders Maria Orlova and Olga Potylitsina were all suspended, according to the reports. They made up two-thirds of the Russian Olympic skeleton team in Sochi but have not received sanctions regarding their 2014 Olympic results.

Last Friday, the International Bobsled and Skeleton Federation announced that four Russian skeleton athletes were provisionally suspended but did not name names.

At least 10 Russian Olympians from Sochi are currently provisionally suspended since the second part of a World Anti-Doping Agency-commissioned report into Russian doping violations in Sochi was published Dec. 9.

The other six suspended Sochi Olympians known so far were cross-country skiers, including Russia’s top two skiers from those Winter Games.

Two Russian biathletes have also been suspended in connection to the WADA-commissioned report. Though their names haven’t been announced by national or international governing bodies, Russian and Italian media have said they were Sochi Olympians.

The skiers and biathletes, like the skeleton sliders, have not received sanctions regarding their Olympic results.

On Dec. 23, the IOC said it opened disciplinary proceedings against 28 Russian Olympians for whom there was “evidence of manipulation of one or more of their urine samples” from the Sochi Winter Games.

The IOC move was in response to the WADA-commissioned report by Richard McLaren that said more than 1,000 Russian athletes were involved in organized doping. Russians who won 15 medals in Sochi had their samples tampered with, according to the report.

The suspended Russian skeleton athletes are in line to miss the next two World Cup stops.

Tretiyakov leads the men’s World Cup standings after two of eight scheduled stops. In second place is South Korean Yun Sung-bin, one of the 2018 Olympic host country’s top athletes across all sports. Yun’s hopes of becoming the first South Korean to win a World Cup skeleton season title increase with Tretiyakov’s absence.

This year’s world skeleton championships are in Koenigssee, Germany, in February, after they were moved from Sochi after the McLaren report was published.

MORE: Katie Uhlaender, fourth in Sochi, contacts Russian skeleton bronze medalist

Four Russian skeleton athletes banned amid Sochi doping probe

SOCHI, RUSSIA - FEBRUARY 15:  Nikita Tregybov of Russia makes a run during the Men's Skeleton on Day 8 of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at Sliding Center Sanki on February 15, 2014 in Sochi, Russia.  (Photo by Cameron Spencer/Getty Images)
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Four Russian skeleton athletes were provisionally suspended by the International Bobsled and Skeleton Federation in response to an International Olympic Committee investigation into Russian doping at the Sochi Winter Games.

The IBSF did not name the suspended athletes nor did it say if they were all Sochi Olympians. Russia sent six skeleton athletes to the 2014 Olympics, with two earning medals.

Aleksandr Tretiyakov took gold in the Olympic men’s race. Yelena Nikitna took bronze in the women’s race, .04 ahead of American Katie Uhlaender. Tretiyakov and Nikitina have continued to race on the World Cup circuit, which resumes next week in Altenberg, Germany, following its usual holiday break.

The IBSF announcement came one week after the IOC said it opened disciplinary proceedings against 28 Russian Olympians for whom there was “evidence of manipulation of one or more of their urine samples” from the Sochi Winter Games.

The IOC move was in response to a World Anti-Doping Agency-commissioned report by Richard McLaren that said more than 1,000 Russian athletes were involved in organized doping. Russians who won 15 medals in Sochi had their samples tampered with, according to the report.

“It has been a hard time for all of us in sports after the publication of the McLaren Report,” IBSF president Ivo Ferriani said in a press release Friday. “The IBSF is fully committed to ensure all necessary steps will be taken to gain back the integrity of sport.”

The International Ski Federation (FIS) already suspended six Russian cross-country skiers in connection with the Sochi doping cases.

Like the IBSF, FIS has not released the names of the skiers, though Russian media has reported they include the two most decorated Russian skiers from the Sochi Olympics. Those two skiers are not on Russia’s roster for the annual Tour de Ski, which starts Saturday, after competing in World Cups this season.

MORE: Katie Uhlaender, fourth in Sochi, contacts Russian skeleton bronze medalist