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Mark McMorris’ brother details snowboarder’s life-threatening crash

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Mark McMorris‘ life was in danger after the snowboarder crashed into an area of trees riding in the backcountry in British Columbia on Saturday, according to Postmedia News, quoting older brother Craig.

Craig was there when McMorris, the Sochi slopestyle bronze medalist, suffered a fractured jaw, fractured left arm, ruptured spleen, stable pelvic fracture, rib fractures and a collapsed left lung.

McMorris was found conscious, but he was struggling to breathe with blood in his mouth, according to Canadian media.

“You can die from that, from bleeding out,” Craig said, according to Postmedia News. “But it was so hard for him to breathe, so that was my biggest concern with time. I communicated that to the search and rescue, and that’s why they got there as fast as they possibly could. Mark knew it was super bad. I knew it was super bad. But you just have to think positive, and that’s why he is still here.

More details of the rescue, via Postmedia News:

Craig McMorris and a handful of friends on site peeled off their jackets to create a nest for the injured Olympian. The couldn’t move him for fear of a spinal cord injury, and hypothermia was a real danger while waiting about 90 minutes for search and rescue personnel to arrive. Every minute counted due to the ruptured spleen.

“I’ve been involved in backcountry rescues before,” Craig said, according to the Canadian Press. “This was by far the gnarliest and most severe.”

An airlift to a hospital, two surgeries and two days later, McMorris was looking more upbeat in his hospital bed on both brothers’ Instagram pages Monday.

He has been named to Canada’s Olympic team for PyeongChang, and Craig believes he will be there to compete. Before the accident, McMorris was considered a gold-medal threat in slopestyle and the new event of big air.

“It’s been 48 hours, and he’s gone from being the most broken human to talking and communicating,” Craig said, according to Postmedia News. “In his mind, he’s going to the Olympics. In my mind, he’s going to the Olympics. There’s no reason why he can’t.”

McMorris has come back from injury before, but not this severe.

He won bronze in the first Olympic snowboard slopestyle event in Sochi, competing 12 days after breaking a rib.

He has already come back in this Olympic cycle from breaking his right femur in an Air and Style big air run in Los Angeles on Feb. 21, 2016.

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Mark McMorris hospitalized after snowboarding accident

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Olympic bronze medalist Mark McMorris suffered several injuries including a fractured jaw, fractured left arm, ruptured spleen, stable pelvic fracture, rib fractures and a collapsed left lung during a backcountry snowboarding trip Saturday, according to Canada Snowboard.

McMorris underwent surgery to control bleeding from the spleen on Saturday. He underwent another surgery to repair the jaw and arm fractures Sunday and was resting in Vancouver General Hospital on Monday morning.

“While both the mandible and humerus fractures were complicated injuries, the surgeries went very well, and both fractures are now stabilized to heal in excellent position,” Canada Snowboard team physician Dr. Rodney J. French said, according to the press release. “It is too early to speculate on a timeline for Mark’s recovery.”

McMorris, 23, won bronze in the first Olympic snowboard slopestyle event in Sochi, competing 12 days after breaking a rib.

McMorris has been considered a threat for two gold medals in PyeongChang, with the addition of big air. He earned Winter X Games medals in both slopestyle and big air in 2015, 2016 and 2017, including double gold in 2015.

He has already come back in this Olympic cycle from breaking his right femur in an Air and Style big air run in Los Angeles on Feb. 21, 2016 (video here). His rehab has been extensively documented by Canadian media.

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MORE: McMorris, after horrible injury, ups risk for 2 golds in PyeongChang

Five U.S. Olympic hopefuls born in the 2000s

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Who will be the youngest member of the 2018 U.S. Olympic team?

Here are five candidates:

Vincent Zhou, Figure Skating, Age 16
The surprise U.S. silver medalist behind Nathan Chen last month. Zhou’s quadruple jump arsenal is second only to Chen among Americans. Zhou has never skated in senior international competition, but the second spot (and possibly third) on the U.S. Olympic team appears up for grabs behind Chen.

Red Gerard, Snowboarding, Age 16
Gerard is halfway to an automatic PyeongChang berth after winning the U.S. Grand Prix at Mammoth Mountain, Calif., the first U.S. Olympic slopestyle qualifier, on Sunday. Pretty much another podium finish in one of the final three qualifiers next season will ink him on the Olympic team as the youngest U.S. Olympic male snowboarder of all time.

Chloe Kim, Snowboarding, Age 16
Kim is the most acclaimed athlete on this list with two X Games halfpipe titles, Youth Olympic gold and a bevy of sponsorships. She had won seven straight halfpipe contests before finishing third at the X Games in January and fourth at the U.S. Grand Prix at Mammoth last weekend.

Hailey Langland, Snowboarding, Age 16
Langland could go for medals in big air and the new Olympic event of slopestyle in PyeongChang. She won the former and finished fourth in the latter at X Games last month and followed that up by finishing second in the first Olympic slopestyle qualifier the following week.

Maddie Mastro, Snowboarding, Age 16
When Kim scored a perfect 100 at the 2016 U.S. Grand Prix at Park City, it was Mastro who finished second with a strong 92 points. The competition for one of four Olympic women’s halfpipe spots will be fierce. Older hopefuls include Olympic champions Kelly Clark and Hannah Teter, current X Games champion Elena Hight and 2013 World champion Arielle Gold.

PYEONGCHANG 2018
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Oldest US Olympian? | Youngest US Olympian? | Venue Photo Gallery | North Korea