Dana Vollmer
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Dana Vollmer announces second pregnancy

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Dana Vollmer, a seven-time Olympic swimming medalist, is pregnant with her second child due in July, according to her social media.

Vollmer has already returned from one pregnancy to compete, and earn Olympic medals, and she could do so again. Vollmer said during and after the Rio Olympics that the plan was to have a second child with husband Andy Grant and return to competition.

In fact, Vollmer said in the fall that she talked with her swimsuit maker, Tyr, about designing a suit to accommodate a baby bump.

“I didn’t swim at all with [baby boy] Arlen, so I’m hoping to be able to train through more of the pregnancy, hopefully,” Vollmer said in November. “Last time I was on bedrest. Really hoping that doesn’t happen.”

Vollmer said then that she could even see a scenario where she competes in the early stages of pregnancy.

In the last Olympic cycle, Vollmer competed in the season after the London Olympics. Then she took 23 months off from competition — Arlen was born March 6, 2015 — before returning 13 months before the Rio Games.

“This time, if we get pregnant soon, then I’ll have more time than I had leading up to Rio,” Vollmer said in November. “I do feel like that I kind of ran out of time. I could have been faster in Rio. It’s part of what motivates me to continue swimming right now. I still feel like I have a faster swim in me.”

Vollmer was plenty fast in 2016.

In Rio, she took bronze in the 100m butterfly, silver as part of the 4x100m freestyle relay and gold with the 4x100m medley relay.

Vollmer will be 32 come 2020, which is older than any previous U.S. Olympic female swimmer save Dara Torres, who raced at Sydney 2000 at age 33 and Beijing 2008 at 41.

Vollmer’s pregnancy break leaves Olympic Trials champion Kelsi Worrell as the favorite for the U.S. Championships in June, where the top two qualify for the world championships in Budapest in July.

Sarah GibsonCassidy Bayer and Kendyl Stewart were the next-fastest Americans in the 100m butterfly last year.

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Matt Grevers, after tearfully watching Olympics on airport runway, keeps swimming

AUSTIN, TX - JUNE 05:  Matt Grevers prepares to swim the Men's 100 meter backstroke heat race during the Longhorn Aquatics Elite Invite on June 5, 2016 in Austin, Texas.  (Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images)
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For years, U.S. swimmer Matt Grevers thought he would be in Rio de Janeiro on the night of Aug. 8, 2016.

Instead, he was at the Green Bay-Austin Straubel International Airport.

It’s 8:35 p.m., and Grevers is seated on his plane, which is taxiing to its takeoff runway. Grevers is unmissable at 6 feet, 8 inches, but in this instance he’s trying his best to be inconspicuous.

That’s because he’s ignoring (or at least delaying) protocol to turn off his phone. Grevers is watching on a stream the finalists being introduced for the Olympic men’s 100m backstroke final.

It’s the race where Grevers took silver at the 2008 Olympics, and then won in 2012. But on June 27, he finished third in the Olympic Trials 100m back, missing the Olympic team by one spot.

So he watched the Olympic final from his seat, shielding his phone from flight attendants, as Ryan Murphy and David Plummer finished first and third in Rio on Aug. 8.

“I had tears well up in my eyes,” Grevers said, pausing briefly before making sure to add, “of joy.”

“There’s a tiny tinge of jealousy to not be there, but so much pride in both David Plummer and Ryan Murphy.”

The race finished as Grevers’ plane was at about full speed on the runway. He had spent time in Wisconsin at a cabin owned by his wife’s family.

Grevers will race for the first time since the Olympic Trials, headlining this weekend’s USA Swimming Pro Series meet in Austin, Texas (Friday through Sunday on NBC Sports).

There were reports at the Olympic Trials that the 31-year-old Grevers was retiring, but that obviously wasn’t the case.

“I would be lying [if I didn’t say] I might be done competing at the highest level,” Grevers said. “I’m for sure going to swim forever, even masters [meets], so I don’t think I’d ever retire, but trying to be an elite swimmer, definitely I’ve had my doubts on that. Just giving time to think about everything, I really do love swimming at the highest level. So I’m going to keep trying to do it until, really, I’m not successful at all anymore.”

Grevers knows what it’s like to rebound from missing a team.

In 2010, he was fourth in the 100m back at the U.S. Championships, failing to qualify for both the 2010 Pan Pacific Championships and 2011 World Championships. Then he set 100m back personal bests at both the 2012 Olympic Trials and 2012 Olympics, taking gold in London.

The task will of course be more difficult to return to the top now that Grevers is north of 30. Murphy, who swept the backstrokes in Rio, is only 21 years old and broke Grevers’ Olympic record in the 100m back.

Plummer announced his retirement on Wednesday.

“It’s sad to see him go and retire, but selfishly I guess I can say that makes making the world team a little easier,” Grevers said.

Nobody other than Murphy and Plummer swam within three tenths of Grevers’ best time of 2016 in the 100m back. One of the two 100m back spots for the world championships in Budapest in July is there for the taking.

In another big life change, Grevers became a father on Nov. 9 when wife, former U.S. swimmer Annie Chandler, gave birth to daughter Skylar.

“I have not had the focus and time to work on my stroke as much, so no sharpening on my skills,” said Grevers, who still trains in Tucson, Ariz., with coach Rick DeMont. “Right now, I’m maybe an 80 out of 100 ready to race fast.”

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Swimmer David Plummer retires after 2 medals in Rio

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - AUGUST 12:  David Plummer of the United States competes in the Men's 4 x 100m Medley Relay heat on Day 7 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Olympic Aquatics Stadium on August 12, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  (Photo by Adam Pretty/Getty Images)
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David Plummer, who made his first Olympic team in his fourth attempt and won two medals in Rio, has retired, according to USA Swimming.

“I haven’t been in the water since Rio, so this has been true for a while, but now I am saying it out loud and I am admitting it to myself,” Plummer wrote, according to Swimswam.com. “I am retiring. I am done swimming.

“This was a hard decision to make. I have defined myself as a swimmer since I was five years old, but it comes down to this: I don’t want it any more. The majority of my life I have wanted to swim fast more than I wanted to breathe. I don’t want it that way anymore.”

Plummer, at age 30, became the oldest first-time U.S. Olympic swimmer since 1904 and earned bronze in the 100m backstroke and gold in the 4x100m medley relay.

He did so after his fourth Olympic Trials appearance, following finishing third in the 100m back at the 2012 Olympic Trials, where the top two make the Olympic team.

“I have been told by many people since the Olympics that they were inspired by my perseverance,” Plummer wrote, according to Swimswam. “I always just thought I was a slow learner. Honestly, I just couldn’t find a way to step away when I still had more to accomplish, more to prove to myself.”

Plummer’s absence shouldn’t hurt the U.S. swim team too much. The last two Olympic 100m back champions are active Americans — Ryan Murphy and Matt Grevers. Grevers finished third at last summer’s Olympic Trials, so he couldn’t defend his title in Rio.

“As an American backstroker there was never a shortage of people faster than me,” Plummer wrote, according to Swimswam. “I got to race guys like Ryan Murphy and Aaron Piersol (sic) (and the list goes on and on). I also got to race a guy named Matt Grevers. He is a guy who will haunt your dreams. I actually had nightmares of him out-touching me in races.”

Grevers is slated for his first meet since the Olympic Trials in Austin, Texas, this weekend, with coverage on NBC Sports.

Austin Broadcast Schedule — 7 ET each night
Friday — NBCSN
Saturday — NBCSN
Sunday — NBCSports.com/live and the NBC Sports app

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