BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND - FEBRUARY 18:  Sir Mo Farah of Great Britain celebrates winning the Men’s 5000 metres final during the Muller Indoor Grand Prix 2017 at Barclaycard Arena on February 18, 2017 in Birmingham, England.  (Photo by Dan Mullan/Getty Images)
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Mo Farah says he’s ‘done nothing wrong’ after report of drug misuse

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LONDON (AP) — Quadruple Olympic champion Mo Farah maintained Sunday that he has always competed cleanly and never broken anti-doping rules, countering any association with “allegations of drug misuse.”

The British distance runner’s statement followed fresh accusations published in the London-based Sunday Times newspaper about his American coach’s use of medicines, based on information obtained by the hacking group known as Fancy Bears. The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) is investigating coach Alberto Salazar, who has been accused of skirting anti-doping rules while training some of his athletes at the Nike Oregon Project.

In a statement, Farah said it was “deeply frustrating” to be forced to respond when he has “done nothing wrong.”

“I am a clean athlete who has never broken the rules in regards to substances, methods or dosages and it is upsetting that some parts of the media, despite the clear facts, continue to try to associate me with allegations of drug misuse,” said Farah, who won the Olympic 5000m and 10,000m in 2012 and 2016.

Farah questioned the motivations of those publishing information suggesting any wrongdoing.

“As I’ve said many times before we all should do everything we can to have a clean sport and it is entirely right that anyone who breaks the rules should be punished,” Farah said. “However, this should be done through proper process and if USADA or any other anti-doping body has evidence of wrongdoing they should publish it and take action rather than allow the media to be judge and jury.”

USADA said it appeared that a draft of a report it was compiling was obtained by Fancy Bears.

“USADA can confirm that it has prepared a report in response to a subpoena from a state medical licensing body regarding care given by a physician to athletes associated with the Nike Oregon Project,” USADA spokesman Ryan Madden wrote in a statement posted on Twitter.

“We understand that the licensing body is still deciding its case and as we continue to investigate whether anti-doping rules were broken, no further comment will be made at this time,” Madden added.

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Dawn Harper-Nelson makes tearful plea about banned medication

BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND - AUGUST 24: Dawn Harper-Nelson of the United States after winning the Women's 100m Hurdles during the Diamond League at Alexander Stadium on August 24, 2014 in Birmingham, England.  (Photo by Ben Hoskins/Getty Images)
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In a tearful social media video, Olympic 100m hurdles champion Dawn Harper-Nelson said Thursday that she was “afraid for my life” because she’s not allowed to take prescribed blood-pressure medication that is banned by anti-doping authorities.

“I just want to say that this is not fair, that I’m afraid for my life,” she said. “I’m about to go into urgent care, because my blood pressure’s really high again. And USADA [U.S. Anti-Doping Agency] said I can’t take the medicine the doctors giving me. And they’re giving me a new medicine. This is just not OK. My head’s bothering me, my vision’s kind of blurry, and they said my blood pressure is high. I’m scared. People need to be aware, this is not cool.”

Harper-Nelson is serving a three-month ban after previously taking a prescribed medication and failing to learn that it contained a banned substance. She said she was prescribed the medication after being rushed to an emergency room and diagnosed with high blood pressure. The ban ends March 1.

Athletes can request therapeutic use exemptions (TUEs) through USADA if they have an illness or condition that requires the use of medication listed on the World Anti-Doping Agency’s Prohibited List. It’s not clear if Harper-Nelson has requested a TUE for medication containing a banned substance.

Harper-Nelson tested positive for the banned diuretic hydrochlorothiazide, which is on the prohibited list, and related metabolites on Dec. 1, according to USADA:

Harper-Nelson’s explanation that her positive test was caused by a blood pressure medication she was prescribed by a physician to treat hypertension. Harper-Nelson further explained that she made efforts to determine if the medication contained prohibited substances; however, due to using partial search terms, those efforts were unsuccessful.

On Thursday, A USADA official reached out to Harper-Nelson on Twitter. USADA has not commented on the situation.

Harper-Nelson won the 2008 Olympic 100m hurdles title and took silver behind Sally Pearson in 2012. She failed to make the Rio Olympic team, getting eliminated in the Olympic Trials semifinals.

The U.S. trio in Rio swept the medals — Brianna RollinsNia Ali and Kristi Castlin.

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Michael Phelps to testify at congressional anti-doping hearing

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - AUGUST 03:  Michael Phelps of the United States speaks with the media during a press conference at the Main Press Centre ahead of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games on August 3, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)
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Michael Phelps is one of five witnesses called to testify at a congressional hearing looking at ways to improve the international anti-doping system in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday.

Phelps will be joined by:

Adam Nelson, 2004 U.S. Olympic shot put champion
Travis Tygart, U.S. Anti-Doping Agency CEO
Dr. Richard Budgett, IOC Medical and Scientific Director
Rob Koehler, World Anti-Doping Agency Deputy Director General

The list was first reported by USA Today  and confirmed Wednesday night.

The House Committee on Energy and Commerce’s Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations is examining the state of the international anti-doping system, challenges it faces and ways it can be improved before the 2018 Olympics.

“The Olympic Games represent the greatest athletes in the world, and we want to preserve the integrity of competition, and ensure clean sport,” subcommittee chairman Rep. Tim Murphy (R-Pa.) said in a press release. “This will be an important discussion to protect the revered distinction both the Olympics Games and their world class athletes hold.”

None of Phelps’ major results — 28 Olympic medals, 33 World Championships medals — have been impacted by the known doping of others.

But in Rio, he praised teammate Lilly King‘s criticisms of athletes competing who had previously served doping punishments. Phelps doubted he had ever competed in a clean sport.

“I think you’re going to probably see a lot of people speaking out more,” Phelps said in Rio, according to The Associated Press. “I think [King] is right, I think something needs to be done. It’s kind of sad today in sports in general, not just in swimming, there are people who are testing positive who are allowed back in the sport and multiple times. It kind of breaks what sport is meant to be and that’s what pisses me off.”

Nelson originally took silver in the 2004 Olympic shot put. Nine years later, he was upgraded to gold after Ukraine’s Yuriy Bilonog was stripped for doping. He received his gold medal at an Atlanta airport food court, reportedly at a table in front of a Chinese restaurant.

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