AP

Oscar Pistorius bruised in prison fight

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JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Olympian Oscar Pistorius, in jail for murdering his girlfriend, was bruised in an altercation with another inmate over telephone use, a South African prison spokesman confirmed Tuesday.

Pistorius sustained a minor injury in an alleged assault at the Attridgevill Correctional Centre last week, Singabakho Nxumalo of the Department of Correctional Services told The Associated Press.

Pistorius had a medical checkup and was found to have a bruise, said Nxumalo, who added that the incident is being investigated.

“The injury is minor, but we at the department take incidents like this seriously and want to prevent any altercations,” said Nxumalo.

The disagreement broke out between Pistorius and another inmate over use of a public telephone, he said.

Pistorius, a double amputee runner who won worldwide acclaim winning in the Paralympics and competing in the Olympics, is serving a 13-year sentence for the murder of his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp.

Pistorius shot her dead in his home on Valentine’s Day 2013 and claimed he thought she was an intruder.

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Shalane Flanagan leads U.S. field for Boston Marathon

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Shalane Flanagan decided not to retire following the biggest win of her career. Rather, she hopes to perhaps top her New York City Marathon victory by winning the Boston Marathon on April 16.

“My heart ♥️ said……give it one more chance, try again,” was posted on Flanagan’s social media Monday. “See everyone in Boston on Patriots Day.”

The 36-year-old, four-time Olympian is entered in the world’s oldest annual 26.2-mile race after spending November debating retirement.

She’ll be joined in the field by a slew of American stars:

Jordan Hasay — 2017 Boston Marathon, third place
Desi Linden — 2011 Boston Marathon, second place
Molly Huddle — 2016 NYC Marathon, third place
Deena Kastor — 2004 Olympic bronze medalist

Galen Rupp — 2017 Boston Marathon, second place
Dathan Ritzenhein — Three-time Olympian
Abdi Abdirahman — 2016 NYC Marathon, third place

Flanagan became the first U.S. female runner to win New York in 40 years by upsetting world-record holder Mary Keitany of Kenya on Nov. 5.

Flanagan teased before the race that she might retire if she pulled off the upset victory, likening it to winning the Super Bowl and walking away.

“I don’t know what it feels like to be Tom Brady or anything, but it’s pretty epic,” she said one day after the win. “Imagine everyone has an individual goal in their lives that they’re striving for, potentially, and achieving that ultimate goal that seems audacious at times. That seems so far-fetched.

“I’m very passionate about running, but there are other things in my life that I love. … There’s other ways I want to contribute to the sport. I want to teach young women how to eat well and how to take care of themselves. Yeah, I have other passions that are starting to bubble up.”

Flanagan has raced 10 marathons since winning a 2008 Olympic 10,000m silver medal, including three times in Boston, near her hometown of Marblehead, Mass.

She was fourth in 2013, fifth in 2014 and ninth in 2015. The last U.S. female runner to win Boston was Lisa Larsen Weidenbach in 1985.

Flanagan, who with her husband fostered two teenage girls since Rio, will release her second co-authored cookbook — “Run Fast. Cook Fast. Eat Slow” — in August.

“I’d have to really assess what’s going to drive me forward,” she said after winning New York. “If I do continue to go forward, you have to have a lot of motivation to be in this sport. It’s an all-encompassing lifestyle. It’s not a nine-to-five. It’s literally every single day you’re making decisions. How can I be the best possible athlete? You don’t check in and check out.”

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MORE: Nick Symmonds, figure skating champ run Honolulu Marathon

Mao Asada, Nick Symmonds finish Honolulu Marathon

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Olympic figure skating silver medalist Mao Asada ran the Honolulu Marathon in 4 hours, 34 minutes, 13 seconds, on Sunday.

Nick Symmonds, a two-time U.S. Olympic 800m runner, ran 3:00:35.

Asada, a three-time world champion from Japan who retired in April, just missed her reported goal of breaking 4:30 but beat another reported goal.

She easily went faster than older sister Mai’s reported time from the Nagoya Marathon in 2013, about five hours.

The Honolulu Marathon was sponsored by Japan Airlines, which has put Asada’s image on the side of a plane.

Symmonds wanted to break three hours but said he was done in by a hill at mile 24, where he split more than 8 minutes.

“I want to break three so I never have to run another one,” Symmonds said, adding that he averaged 25 miles a week in training (that’s on the low side for suggested marathon training). “I’ve run almost every day of my life for 20 years, so that helps. … It was really fun for 20 miles, and then I tried to stay mentally tough for six. … I’m going to set a goal to run a spring marathon, find a nice, flat course and really get after it.”

Symmonds, the 2013 World 800m silver medalist who retired earlier this year, has said he wants to climb the tallest mountain on every continent.

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ゼッケン受け取りました❗️ いよいよ明日が本番です‼️

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