Five fun facts about Sochi

1 Comment

It’s never too early to look waaaaay ahead toward the 2014 Winter Games in Sochi, Russia (also, heads up: the 2014 Winter Olympics are in Sochi, Russia, and only 17 months away). Here are five fun facts you probably didn’t know about the next host city.

1. Geography!
Sochi lies on the Eastern edge of the Black Sea, putting it in the same geopolitical neighborhood as Ukraine, Turkey and – get excited – Georgia (the country). Tensions between Russia and its former Soviet satellite tend to boil over every so often, so here’s hoping that doesn’t happen around the Olympics — or ever again, for that matter.

2. Celebrity!
Despite the U.S. history lesson given to her by Serena Williams in London 2012’s gold medal match, Maria Sharapova remains one of the elite players in the women’s game right now – and the 25-year-old began her career at a tennis academy in Sochi.

3. Politics!
The Sochi Games will be the second time Russia has hosted the Olympics, but the first time (fingers crossed) that the U.S. has attended an Olympics in Russia – Team USA boycotted the 1980 Moscow Olympics because back then America and the Soviets weren’t exactly best buds.

4. Oppression! Relaxation!
Sochi has been a resort town since its coastline was settled in the late 1800s, and even the grimmest days of Communism didn’t change that – former Soviet Premier Joseph Stalin loved it so much that he is said to have had a vacation home there. Today over two million visitors come to Sochi each year.

5. Climate!
With its resort-like atmosphere, it’s charming summer weather (the summers are supposedly gorgeous, though it’s the town’s proximity to the Caucasus Mountains that helped win it the 2014 Games), and the fact that it’s a lot closer to the Mediterranean than one might imagine, Sochi is often referred to as the ‘Russian Riviera.’ Be prepared to hear that moniker tossed around a lot next winter.

Aaron Stern is a regular contributor to OlympicTalk. Feel free to send all hate-Tweets here.

Chinese figure skating judges banned for biased Olympic scoring

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Two Chinese figure skating judges were suspended by the International Skating Union for biased judging at the PyeongChang Olympics.

Chen Weiguang and Huang Feng had “preferential marking” for top Chinese skaters Jin Boyang (fourth place in PyeongChang) and the silver medalist pairs’ team of Sui Wenjing and Han Cong, respectively, according to the ISU.

Chen was banned two years and excluded from the 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing. Huang got a one-year ban.

Chen awarded her highest grades of execution scores of the men’s competition to Jin, as well as her second-highest program components scores, trailing only gold medalist Yuzuru Hanyu. Both sets of scores, in both the short and long programs, were out of line with the other eight judges.

“There is evidence of preference for the Chinese skater and prejudice against his strongest competitors,” an ISU report read. “Her marks were completely unrealistic.”

The pairs’ judge Huang “obviously favored his pair also vis-à-vis the other top candidates for the Olympic gold medal,” the ISU said in a report, referencing inflated scores for Sui and Han and lower scores for gold and bronze medalists Aljona Savchenko and Bruno Massot of Germany and Meagan Duhamel and Eric Radford of Canada.

Huang was warned one month before the Olympics by the ISU for biased judging at the December 2017 Grand Prix Final pairs’ event.

Both suspensions are subject to appeal to the Court of Arbitration for Sport.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Adam Rippon opines on figure skating future

Javier Fernandez to skip Grand Prix, still compete next season

Getty Images
1 Comment

Javier Fernandez, who in PyeongChang became the first Spanish Olympic figure skating medalist, will skip the fall Grand Prix series but return for January’s European Championships, which could be his final competition.

Europeans will be Fernandez’s focus for the season, his agent said Tuesday.

Fernandez, 26, added an Olympic bronze medal to his 2015 and 2016 World titles. He has said that his third Olympics in PyeongChang would be his last. But Fernandez did not say he would retire after the Winter Games, though he did skip the world championships in March.

Fernandez now plans to compete in his 13th straight European Championships in Minsk in January. He won the last six titles. It’s unknown if he will continue on to the world championships in Saitama, Japan, in March.

In Fernandez’s absence, the top male singles skaters in the fall Grand Prix season should be double Olympic champion Yuzuru Hanyu, PyeongChang silver medalist Shoma Uno and American Nathan Chen, who was fifth at the Olympics after a disastrous short program but ran away with March’s world title by the largest margin in history.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Adam Rippon opines on figure skating future