Golf, Turkey, and the Olympic effect

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By the time golf makes its triumphant Olympic return at the 2016 Rio Games it will have been on hiatus for 112 years. But with the sport’s recent exponential growth worldwide, now seems a perfect time to add it back on to the schedule.

In related news, Turkey decided to point out how great an Olympic host it would be with two major golf events in the weeks following the Ryder Cup. First, the World Golf Amateur Team Championship, which brought in 72 teams from around the world. Next the World Golf Finals, with appearances by one-name-is-enough athletes Tiger and Rory.

Now the country’s golf organization has announced that it will host the first ever Turkish Golf Open next November, which will bring in the sport’s top names and award $7 million in prize money.

This seems far from coincidental considering Instanbul’s Olympic bid, especially as golf has grown to become the eighth most popular world sport with an estimated 450 million fans. Peter Dawson, president of the International Golf Federation, told the AP that an “emphasis on the Olympics” is very evident.

“The interest is there,” Dawson said following the IGF biennial meeting. “It’s amazing that in these countries they think of Olympic sports, instead of golf as its own sport. It’s certainly starting to serve to grow the game.”

Yes, this year’s World Golf Amateur Team Championship was the first time the event has hosted a full 72-team field, and even had a waiting list that included Saudi Arabia, Mauritius, Namibia and Lebanon… but is the worldwide demand because of the Olympics or is golf in the Olympics because of the worldwide demand?

Those in Turkey don’t seem to care what the order is, but they’re pushing hard and making sure everyone takes notice: Turkey is a golf destination now, and maybe an Olympics destination sooner rather than later.

Olympic cycling champion faces army reprimand for bare-bottom White House photo

AP
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BERN, Switzerland (AP) — Olympic cycling champion Nino Schurter faces being reprimanded by the Swiss Army after posting a photo on social media showing his bare bottom with the White House in the background.

The army confirmed details reported in Swiss media that the 33-year-old mountain biker faces a possible warning from his senior officers over the incident this month, though any disciplinary action will not be announced.

The Rio gold medalist and record eight-time world champion is supported in his career by Switzerland’s military.

Schurter was on service duty between races in the United States two weeks ago when he posted a photo on Instagram with three team colleagues all dropping their pants while facing the White House.

The photo, since deleted but viewable here, was tagged to President Donald Trump and included the message “white (peach emoji) for the White House.”

The Swiss Army says it did not want to make a scandal of the incident, and Schurter had apologized to his commanding officer. He told Swiss media taking the photo had been spontaneous and he loved being in the U.S.

Schurter is the current Swiss sportsman of the year, beating tennis great Roger Federer into second place in December in a public vote.

MORE: World Road Cycling Championships TV Schedule

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2019 World Road Cycling Championships TV, live stream schedule

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The World Road Cycling Championships begin Sunday in Yorkshire, Great Britain. Every race streams live for NBC Sports Gold “Cycling Pass” subscribers.

Olympic Channel: Home of Team USA and NBCSN also air TV coverage of the eight-day championships.

Look for a possibly wide-open men’s time trial on Wednesday given 2017 champion Tom Dumoulin of the Netherlands is out after missing the Tour de France with a knee injury. Australian Rohan Dennis, last year’s winner, is a bit of an unknown after quitting the Tour de France in a dispute with his team.

Slovakian Peter Sagan looks to reclaim the road race on the final day on Sept. 29. Sagan won three straight titles before 39-year-old Alejandro Valverde of Spain took last year’s event on a climber’s course.

Dutch women swept the time trial and road race titles the last two years. They’re once again led by Anna van der Breggen, the reigning Olympic and world road race champion, and Annemiek van Vleuten, who recovered from her head-first Rio Olympic crash to win the last two world time trials.

But look out for another Dutch veteran, Marianne Vos, a 32-year-old having a resurgent season. The London Olympic road race champ seeks her first world medal since the tail end of her single-day road dominance in 2013.

The U.S. roster is led by Amber Neben, who won her second time trial world title in 2017 at age 42, and Chloe Dygert Owen, the 22-year-old track world champion who wants to make the Olympic team in both disciplines.

The American men feature Chad Haga, who won the final-stage time trial at the Giro d’Italia in June, and fellow Tour de France veterans Brent Bookwalter and Lawson Craddock.

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MORE: Chris Froome: Pre-Tour de France crash like ‘Grey’s Anatomy’ scene

Date Event Time (ET) Network
Sept. 22 Team Time Trial Mixed Relay 8:10 a.m. Streaming
5:30 p.m.* Olympic Channel
Sept. 23 Women’s Junior Individual Time Trial 5 a.m. Olympic Channel
Men’s Junior Individual Time Trial 8:30 a.m. Olympic Channel
Sept. 24 Men’s U23 Individual Time Trial 5 a.m. Olympic Channel
Women’s Individual Time Trial 9:30 a.m. Olympic Channel
Sept. 25 Men’s Individual Time Trial 8 a.m. Olympic Channel
Sept. 26 Men’s Junior Road Race 7 a.m. Olympic Channel
Sept. 27 Women’s Junior Road Race 3:30 a.m. Olympic Channel
Men’s U23 Road Race 9 a.m. Olympic Channel
Sept. 28 Women’s Road Race 5:40 a.m. Streaming
2:30 p.m.* Olympic Channel
Sept. 29 Men’s Road Race 3:30 a.m. Olympic Channel
10 p.m.* NBCSN

*Same-day delayed broadcast.