Tom Sermanni named U.S. Women’s soccer coach

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After three straight gold medals and a couple World Cup titles we’re almost certain the U.S. Women’s team could operate independent of any oversight so long as Abby Wambach and Alex Morgan are around, but just to be safe Tom Sermanni was brought in as the new head coach of the team on Tuesday, effective January 1, 2013.

“[Sermanni] has the knowledge, experience and vision to take on the challenge of keeping our team at the top of the world,” U.S. Soccer President Sunil Gulati said in a release. “He has a tremendous passion for the game, knows the American players, understands our system and knows the process of preparing a team for a World Cup tournament.”

Sermanni comes to the U.S. after two stints with Australia totaling eleven years, and enters as the seventh head coach of the team since 1985. He takes over for Pia Sundhage, who is returning to her native Sweden after four successful years with Team USA. Jill Ellis has been coaching in the interim since the Olympics.

A native of Scotland, Sermanni played more than 300 professional matches before landing coaching gigs in Canberra, San Jose, and New York. He led the Matildas to the 1995 World Cup and a top-10 FIFA ranking during his tenure. After finishing out his obligations down under Sermanni will observe the team’s last three U.S. games of 2012 (yet to be announced), and then take over when the new year rolls around.

David Rudisha escapes car crash ‘well and unhurt’

AP
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David Rudisha, a two-time Olympic champion and world record holder at 800m, is “well and unhurt” after a car accident in his native Kenya, according to his Facebook account.

Kenyan media reported that one of Rudisha’s tires burst on Saturday night, leading his car to collide with a bus, and he was treated for minor injuries at a hospital.

Rudisha, 30, last raced July 4, 2017, missing extended time with a quad muscle strain and back problems. His manager said last week that Rudisha will miss next month’s world championships.

Rudisha owns the three fastest times in history, including the world record 1:40.91 set in an epic 2012 Olympic final.

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Tokyo Paralympic medals unveiled with historic Braille design, indentations

Tokyo Paralympic Medals
Tokyo 2020
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The Tokyo Paralympic medals, which like the Olympic medals are created in part with metals from recycled cell phones and other small electronics, were unveiled on Sunday, one year out from the Opening Ceremony.

In a first for the Paralympics, each medal has one to three indentation(s) on its side to distinguish its color by touch — one for gold, two silver and three for bronze. Braille letters also spell out “Tokyo 2020” on each medal’s face.

For Rio, different amounts of tiny steel balls were put inside the medals based on their color, so that when shaken they would make distinct sounds. Visually impaired athletes could shake the medals next to their ears to determine the color.

More on the design from Tokyo 2020:

The design is centered around the motif of a traditional Japanese fan, depicting the Paralympic Games as the source of a fresh new wind refreshing the world as well as a shared experience connecting diverse hearts and minds. The kaname, or pivot point, holds all parts of the fan together; here it represents Para athletes bringing people together regardless of nationality or ethnicity. Motifs on the leaves of the fan depict the vitality of people’s hearts and symbolize Japan’s captivating and life-giving natural environment in the form of rocks, flowers, wood, leaves, and water. These are applied with a variety of techniques, producing a textured surface that makes the medals compelling to touch.

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Tokyo Paralympic Medals

Tokyo Paralympic Medals