The search for a new U.S. gymnastics captain

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The eight year de facto U.S. gymnastics team captain, Alicia Sacramone, announced her retirement from the sport late last month, and so this post started as a tear-stained, high school diary entry. But that didn’t seem totally appropriate. Instead I’ve decided to be positive, kind of, and pick who might be the next Alicia. Unfortunately Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman, who took charge of the role while Alicia was out with an Achilles injury, isn’t in the picture for 2013 and hasn’t announced any future intentions to continue in the sport. So we have cross her off for now. Who’s next?

1. Jordyn Wieber – Wieber seems like the obvious choice. She’s mentally tough and physically dependable. She showed strength of character by putting her personal disappointment aside and coming through big time to help her team clench gold in the Olympic team final. Sounds like leadership material to me. She’ll be one of the most experienced, and most decorated seniors going into the 2013 season.

2. Elizabeth Price – Ebee was phenomenal at Olympic Trials. Still a little green, she was just short of making the team and settled for alternate. Since then she’s been on fire winning two world cup all-around titles and gaining valuable international experience. Ebee has the respect of the other elite gymnasts and in time could grow into a team leader with her positive outlook and powerful presence.

3. Mckalya Maroney – Maroney recently revealed she’s, “not done” and that she’d like to compete at the 2013 national championships and make the world team. She’s admitted that it’s a long shot due to her 2012 surgery following a tour related injury, but that doesn’t mean she can’t contribute leadership. Maroney only competed one event for team USA in London, but she was by far the biggest cheerleader for the entire team on the sidelines. Plus, she has that natural leadership swagger.

4. Rebecca Bross – No word yet from Bross on retirement (which is a good thing). Touted as the future of USA gymnastics in 2009, Bross had a meltdown at the U.S. Trials and failed to the make the team as an event specialist. Yet, she’s the most decorated world championship gymnast of the last four years (six world medals) and having seen both great success and great disappointment she has the right perspective that makes a great leader. Bross has been there and could be trusted to help lift a team up. She gets my vote.

Who gets yours?

Caeleb Dressel takes gold, silver at short course worlds as rival DQed

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Caeleb Dressel earned his second individual silver medal in as many events at short-course worlds, while one of his top rivals was disqualified in Friday’s 50m freestyle final in Hangzhou, China.

Dressel, who tied Michael Phelps‘ record with seven gold medals at 2017 Worlds in the larger, Olympic-size pool, finished second to Russian Vladimir Morozov in Friday’s 50m free. Morozov clocked 20.33 seconds — just .07 off the world record — while Dressel touched in 20.54.

Another medal favorite, Great Britain’s Ben Proud, originally finished third but was disqualified for moving on the starting block too early.

“I twitched on the racing block, something I’ve done before, something I’m not too happy with about myself,” Proud said, according to FINA.

Dressel also led off the U.S.’ winning 4x50m free relay on Friday, breaking his American record in the 50m free. Dressel has four golds (all in relays) and two silvers with two days left at the meet. He also finished second in Thursday’s 100m butterfly to South African Chad le Clos.

Short-course worlds are held in even years in 25-meter pools rather than 50-meter pools used at the Olympics. U.S. Olympic champions Katie LedeckySimone Manuel and Lilly King are among those not competing this week.

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In other events Friday, Hungarian Katinka Hosszu earned her third individual title of the week, this one in the 100m individual medley. Hosszu swept the IMs at the Rio Olympics and the last three world championships in an Olympic-size pool.

Ledecky rival Ariarne Titmus of Australia broke Chinese Wang Jianjiahe‘s world record in the 400m freestyle, relegating the 16-year-old Wang to silver.

American Ryan Murphy, who swept the Olympic 100m and 200m backstrokes, took silver in the 50m back, .05 behind Russian rival Yevgeny Rylov.

Another American, Kelsi Dahlia, picked up her second individual butterfly medal of the week, taking bronze in the 50m fly won by Dutchwoman Ranomi Kromowidjojo.

Worlds continue Saturday, with finals streaming live on OlympicChannel.com and the Olympic Channel app.

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Watch Colin Kaepernick introduce Tommie Smith, John Carlos at USATF Night of Legends

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Twenty-four members of the 1968 U.S. Olympic track and field team appeared at the USATF Night of Legends. Two in particular received a standing ovation before an award presentation.

Tommie Smith and John Carlos, who earned 200m gold and bronze medals and then raised their black-gloved fists on the medal stand, were introduced via video by quarterback Colin Kaepernick, a fellow athlete fighting for social justice.

“Fifty years ago, these two men shook the world,” Kaepernick said in the video. “Their selfless and courageous act had an impact on the heart and mind of millions and have been a huge inspiration to me, personally. They laid the foundation not only for what the conscience of an athlete should look like, but also the world.”

Smith and Carlos then walked on stage at the Night of Legends, which honored the top U.S. athletes and performances of 2018, along with Hall of Fame inductees. NBCSN will air the event on Saturday at 11 p.m. ET.

They presented the Jesse Owens Award, which goes annually to the top U.S. male athlete. Fellow 200m sprinter Noah Lyles earned the honor.

“If he would give you and I a two-day head start, I think we could beat him in the 200m,” Carlos joked to Smith. “We’ve got to lean,” Smith replied.

Lyles, 21, joined Usain Bolt as the only men to break 19.7 seconds in the 200m four times in one year. His best time — 19.65 — was the world’s fastest since Bolt’s last world title in 2015. Lyles also became the youngest U.S. men’s 100m champion in 34 years. He’s the second-youngest person to earn USATF Athlete of the Year after Allyson Felix.

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