How wrestling can get back in the Olympics

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Wrestling was effectively ousted from the 2020 Olympics schedule in an IOC executive committee vote Tuesday at the headquarters in Switzerland, but that doesn’t mean it’s down for the count. The sport can actually gain a reprieve if it can survive two more IOC votes in the upcoming months.

“This is not the end of the process, this is purely a recommendation,” IOC spokesman Mark Adams told reporters after the executive board vote. “It is the session which is sovereign.”

It’s going to take a little convincing, though.

The IOC will now put wrestling up against the seven other sports that have fought long and hard to be added to the schedule, including karate, squash, roller sports, wakeboarding, sport climbing, the chinese martial art of wushu, and baseball and softball in a joint bid.

The first vote will take place among the executive board in St. Petersburg in May, which is a great omen since Russia has won the most wrestling medals at every Olympics since it first began competing as an independent nation at the 1996 Olympics.  But that vote will simply determine which sports will be proposed for the final vote among all the IOC members at a vote in Buenos Aires this September.

Each of the other proposed sports have had months, if not years, to literally pitch themselves to the IOC members (squash was arguably the most convincing), so if wrestling wants to win the vote, the governing body will no doubt have to lean on powerhouses like Russia, Japan and the U.S. for a bit of back room politicking to see if they can’t sway the members in their direction.

It’s not likely to happen, since the IOC executive committee’s decision holds a lot of clout, but if wrestling has anything on its side, it the sport’s history and worldwide popularity. Wrestling has been contested at all but one Olympics since 1896 (it took a quick break in 1900) and has seen more than fifty nations represented at every Summer Games since 1992, including a staggering 75 in Atlanta.

Wrestling fans can also look to baseball and softball for inspiration, since their bid is considered the front runner for the open spot in 2020 after both were similarly voted out in 2005 and were last contested at the Beijing Games in 2008.

Justin Schoenefeld gets U.S.’ first men’s aerials World Cup win in 4 years

Justin Schoenefeld
U.S. Ski & Snowboard
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Justin Schoenefeld ended a four-year U.S. men’s aerials drought with his first World Cup win Saturday in Belarus.

Schoenfeld, 21, hit a double full-full-full in the super final to beat a field that included world champion Maxim Burov of Russia. Burov was fourth, one spot behind another American, Chris Lillis. Full results are here.

“I’m pretty speechless right now,” Schoenefeld said, according to U.S. Ski & Snowboard. “I’m just shocked. It just all came so quick, all of a sudden the two finals were over, and I was on top of the podium. I probably landed two of my training jumps yesterday, but I managed to land all of my comp jumps down to my feet.”

Schoenefeld’s best previous World Cup finish was fourth, in Belarus last season.

Lillis earned the U.S.’ last World Cup men’s aerials victory on Feb. 20, 2016, also in Belarus. The four-year gap between wins marked the longest for the U.S. men since aerials was added as an Olympic medal sport in 1994.

Schoenefeld also became the first American of either gender to win a World Cup aerials event in two years, since Kiley McKinnon on Jan. 6, 2018. That gap was the longest for the U.S. since 2005.

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MORE: Olympic aerials champion retires to coach

Kaillie Humphries wins bobsled world title in first season for U.S.

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Two-time Olympic champion Kaillie Humphries won a bobsled world title in her first season since switching allegiance from Canada to the U.S., ending recent German dominance.

Humphries, with brakewoman Lauren Gibbs, edged German junior world champ Kim Kalicki by .37 of a second combining times from four runs between Friday and Saturday in Altenberg, Germany.

“I love this track. It’s very challenging, one of the hardest in the world,” Humphries said, according to U.S. Bobsled and Skeleton. “It demands a lot of focus, a lot of respect every minute you’re on that track. So to be able to win here, I know the Germans and the spectators, everybody, have worked so hard and this week, no exceptions. I’m proud of all of the girls.”

Canadian Christine de Bruin took bronze for a second straight year. Full results are here.

Humphries, who married a former U.S. bobsledder, was released by Canada in September after filing verbal abuse and harassment claims against a coach, saying she no longer felt safe with the program. As a Canadian, Humphries won 2010 and 2014 Olympic titles, plus 2012 and 2013 World titles.

Humphries joined German Sandra Kiriasis as the only female drivers to win three world titles. She is already the only female driver with multiple Olympic titles.

German Mariama Jamanka, the reigning Olympic champion and defending world champion, finished fourth in Altenberg.

Triple U.S. Olympic medalist Elana Meyers Taylor didn’t compete as she sits out the season due to pregnancy. Meyers Taylor and Gibbs teamed for silver in PyeongChang.

The world championships continue Sunday with the conclusion of the two-man competition. German Francesco Friedrich, eyeing his sixth straight world title, leads after the first two of four runs.

A full TV and live stream schedule is here.

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