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USOC evaluating 35 cities for potential 2024 bid

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The USOC sent letters to 35 mayors Tuesday in order to gauge interest and begin the process of hosting its first Olympics since 2002.

“Our objective in this process is to identify a partner city that can work with us to present a compelling bid to the IOC and that has the right alignment of political, business and community leadership,” USOC CEO Scott Blackmun said in the letter.

“This letter does not guarantee that the USOC will bid for the 2024 Games, but rather is an initial step in evaluating a potential bid.”

The letter detailed the necessary requirements for hosting the Games, including 45,000 hotel rooms, an international airport, public transit, and workforce of more than 200,000 people.

The cities that have already expressed interest include Dallas, Tulsa, New York, San Francisco, Chicago, and Los Angeles, which hosted in 1932 and 1984. My vote still goes to Phoenix.

Paris is seen as a favorite to host its third Olympics, but first in a century. Rome, Dubai, Doha, and Durban, South Africa are also strong contenders to host. The final vote won’t take place until 2017.

The USOC failed to secure bids for New York in 2012 and Chicago in 2016, which was blamed on disagreements regarding revenue sharing between the IOC and USOC. Those disagreements have since been patched up through negotiations.

Here’s a full list of the 35 cities that recieved the letter:

Phoenix, Arizona
Los Angeles, California
Sacramento, California
San Diego, California
San Francisco, California
San Jose, California
Denver, Colorado
Washington, D.C.
Jacksonville, Florida
Miami, Florida
Orlando, Florida
Atlanta, Georgia
Chicago, Illinois
Indianapolis, Indiana
Baltimore, Maryland
Boston, Massachusetts
Detroit, Michigan
Minneapolis, Minnesota
St. Louis, Missouri
Las Vegas, Nevada
New York, New York
Rochester, New York
Charlotte, North Carolina
Columbus, Ohio
Tulsa, Oklahoma
Portland, Oregon
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Memphis, Tennessee
Nashville, Tennessee
Austin, Texas
Dallas, Texas
Houston, Texas
San Antonio, Texas
Seattle, Washington

Officials plan to strip Alpine skier of World Cup win for oxygen mask use

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SELVA DI VAL GARDENA, Italy (AP) — The International Ski Federation (FIS) intends to strip German Alpiner Stefan Luitz of his first World Cup win for using an oxygen mask but will not seek a further ban.

FIS secretary general Sarah Lewis said Friday that the German Ski Association has been notified that the rules call for “disqualification from the race at the event where the offense occurred.”

Racing in a giant slalom in Beaver Creek, Colo., on Dec. 2 that started at 10,340 feet, Luitz was seen using an oxygen tank between runs. He won by retaining his first-run lead.

The victory ended runner-up Marcel Hirscher’s five-race winning streak in the event, but the Olympic champion in giant slalom could yet be awarded the win, the 61st of his career.

FIS anti-doping rules state oxygen tanks cannot be brought to race venues, and “competition results achieved after the use of the equipment shall be automatically disqualified.”

“It’s part of the anti-doping and medical guide regulation but it’s related to a prohibited method so it’s very different from blood doping or taking of anabolic steroids and different offenses are categorized in different ways,” Lewis said. “This is just a breach of the regulations.”

The German association was informed of the FIS decision this week and now has two weeks to request a hearing before a decision will be made. After the decision is issued, the German association can appeal the ruling to the Swiss-based Court of Arbitration for Sport.

While there were reports that other German skiers also used oxygen masks, Lewis said no other athletes were investigated.

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Caeleb Dressel takes gold, silver at short course worlds as rival DQed

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Caeleb Dressel earned his second individual silver medal in as many events at short-course worlds, while one of his top rivals was disqualified in Friday’s 50m freestyle final in Hangzhou, China.

Dressel, who tied Michael Phelps‘ record with seven gold medals at 2017 Worlds in the larger, Olympic-size pool, finished second to Russian Vladimir Morozov in Friday’s 50m free. Morozov clocked 20.33 seconds — just .07 off the world record — while Dressel touched in 20.54.

Another medal favorite, Great Britain’s Ben Proud, originally finished third but was disqualified for moving on the starting block too early.

“I twitched on the racing block, something I’ve done before, something I’m not too happy with about myself,” Proud said, according to FINA.

Dressel also led off the U.S.’ winning 4x50m free relay on Friday, breaking his American record in the 50m free. Dressel has four golds (all in relays) and two silvers with two days left at the meet. He also finished second in Thursday’s 100m butterfly to South African Chad le Clos.

Short-course worlds are held in even years in 25-meter pools rather than 50-meter pools used at the Olympics. U.S. Olympic champions Katie LedeckySimone Manuel and Lilly King are among those not competing this week.

WORLDS: Results | Broadcast Schedule

In other events Friday, Hungarian Katinka Hosszu earned her third individual title of the week, this one in the 100m individual medley. Hosszu swept the IMs at the Rio Olympics and the last three world championships in an Olympic-size pool.

Ledecky rival Ariarne Titmus of Australia broke Chinese Wang Jianjiahe‘s world record in the 400m freestyle, relegating the 16-year-old Wang to silver.

American Ryan Murphy, who swept the Olympic 100m and 200m backstrokes, took silver in the 50m back, .05 behind Russian rival Yevgeny Rylov.

Another American, Kelsi Dahlia, picked up her second individual butterfly medal of the week, taking bronze in the 50m fly won by Dutchwoman Ranomi Kromowidjojo.

Worlds continue Saturday, with finals streaming live on OlympicChannel.com and the Olympic Channel app.

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