Photos surface of Topps 2014 Sochi Olympics trading cards

Gracie Gold
2 Comments

Topps is again coming out with a special U.S. Olympic trading card set for the Sochi Olympic and Paralympic Games. Images of the cards have been published on hobby websites.

The release date is Nov. 6, according to Cardboard Connection.

Beckett posted a checklist of the 100 base athletes in the set.

Here is the exact list on its site, followed by a few notes and then pictures of some of the cards:

Max Aaron, Figure Skating
Jeremy Abbott, Figure Skating
Eddy Alvarez, Short Track Speed Skating
Jamie Anderson, Snowboarding
Lowell Bailey, Biathlon
Allison Baver, Short Track-Speed Skating
Gretchen Bleiler, Snowboarding
Brittany Bowe, Speedskating
Maddie Bowman, Freeskiing
Erika Brown, Curling
Bobby Brow,n Freeskiing
Tim Burke, Biathlon
Heath Calhoun, Alpine Skiing
J.R. Celski, Short track speedskating
Kelly Clark, Snowboarding
Julia Clukey, Luge
Stacey Cook, Alpine Skiing
Emily Cook, Freestyle Skiing
John Coughlin, Figure Skating
John Daly, Skeleton
Meryl Davis, Figure Skating
Shani Davis, Long Track- Speed Skating
Billy Demong, Nordic Skiing
Patrick Deneen, Freestyle Skiing
Caydee Denney, Figure Skating
Simon Dumont, Freeskiing
Susan Dunklee, Biathlon
Katie Eberling, Bobsled
Grete Eliassen, Freeskiing
Kaityln Farrington, Snowboarding
Jazmine Fenlator, Bobsled
Pete Fenson, Curling
Dylan Ferguson, Freestyle Skiing
Bryan Fletcher, Nordic Combined
Taylor Fletcher, Nordic Combined
Travis Ganong, Alpine Skiing
Christina Gao, Figure Skating
Lana Gehring, Speedskating
Nick Goepper, Freeskiing
Gracie Gold, Figure Skating
Chas Guldemond, Snowboarding
Erin Hamlin, Luge
Keri Herman, Freeskiing
Elena Hight, Snowboarding
Steven Holcomb, Bobsled
Nate Holland, Snowboarding
Lindsey Jacobellis, Snowboarding
Lolo Jones, Bobsled
Hannah Kearney, Freestyle Skiing
Gus Kenworthy, Freeskiing
Hilary Knight, Women’s Hockey
Scott Lago, Snowboarding
Jocelyne Lamoureux, Ice Hocky – Wmn
Monique Lamoureux, Ice Hocky – Wmn
Steve Langton, Bobsled
Ted Ligety, Alpine Skiing
Evan Lysacek, Men’s Figure Skating
Devin Logan, Freeskiing
Julia Mancuso, Alpine Skiing
Chris Mazdzer, Luge
Alice McKennis, Alpine Skiing
Heather McPhie, Freestyle Skiing / Moguls
Elana Meyers, Bobsled
Bode Miller, Alpine Skiing
Andy Newell, Cross Country
Alana Nichols, Alpine Skiing
Steve Nyman, Alpine Skiing
Noelle Picus, Pace Women’s Skeleton
Amy Purdy, Snowboard
Kikkan Randall, Nordic Skiing
Justin Reiter, Snowboarding
Heather Richardson, Long Track- Speed Skating
Rico Roman, Para – Sled Hockey
Laurenne Ross, Alpine Skiing
Maia Shibutani, Figure Skating
Alex Shibutani, Figure Skating
Jessica Smith, Speedskating
Leanne Smith, Alpine Skiing
Evan Strong, Snowboard
Marco Sullivan, Alpine Skiing
John Teller, Freestyle Skiing
Hannah Teter, Snowboarding
Curt Tomasevicz, Bobsled
Katie Uhlaender, Skeleton
Danelle Umstead, Para – Alpine Skiing
Lindsey Van, Nordic Skiing
Louie Vito, Snowboarding
Lindsey Vonn, Alpine Skiing
Ashley Wagner, Figure Skating
Jeremy Wagner, Para – Nordic Skiing
Tom Wallisch, Freeskiing
Seth Wescott, Snowboarding
Charlie White, Figure Skating
David Wise, Freeskiing
Torin Yater-Wallace, Freeskiing
Agnes Zawadzki, Figure Skating
Ashley Caldwell, Freestyle Skiing/Aerials
Bree Schaaf, Bobsled
Jessica Schultz, Curling
Nick Baumgartner, Snowboarding

There are also 11 limited edition autographed cards by Olympic legends Bonnie Blair, Brian Boitano, Dick Button, Jim Craig, Mike Eruzione, Peggy Fleming, Scott Hamilton, Dan JansenNancy Kerrigan, Picabo Street and Kristi Yamaguchi.

There are also special “swatch cards” with game-worn athlete patches inserted into the card. This follows a trend set more than 10 years ago in other sports (game-worn jerseys, game-used bats, etc.)

Perhaps the most recognizable U.S. Winter Olympian is not on that list — Shaun White. Other notables missing are world champion ski jumper Sarah Hendrickson, world champion Alpine skier Mikaela Shiffrin and Amanda Kessel, the reigning NCAA women’s hockey player of the year who scored the game-winning goal against Canada in the final of this year’s worlds.

Yes, Lolo Jones is in the set. Of course, it’s no lock she’s going to make the Olympic team.

On multiple sites, I have seen Noelle Pikus-Pace‘s name misspelled on the checklist. We may have another dreaded error card. There were a few in the London 2012 set.

Topps has not responded to an email asking for more information on the set.

source:

source:

source:

source:

source:

Photo: Lindsey Vonn with men dressed as tigers

Japanese pair edges Americans for historic Grand Prix Final figure skating title

Riku Miura, Ryuichi Kihara
Getty
0 Comments

Riku Miura and Ryuichi Kihara won the biggest title ever for a Japanese figure skating pair, taking the Grand Prix Final and consolidating their status as the world’s top active team.

Miura and Kihara, last season’s world silver medalists, barely outscored world champions Alexa Knierim and Brandon Frazier in Turin, Italy, in both Thursday’s short program and Friday’s free skate to win the six-pair event that is a preview of March’s worlds.

The Japanese totaled 214.58 points, distancing the Americans by a mere 1.3 points after Frazier erred on both of their side-by-side jumping passes in the free skate. Italians Sara Conti and Niccolo Macii took bronze.

“We had a very late start to our season than initially planned, so as we have been performing at each event, I see us getting stronger, improving things,” said Frazier, who with Knierim had their best short program and free skate scores of the autumn.

Knierim and Frazier didn’t decide to continue competing together this season until July.

“I feel a little personally disappointed tonight just for myself for my jumps,” Frazier continued. “I was a little all over the place and, normally, I can execute better, so I feel a little bad, but I’m very proud of us overall. We’ve done a great job of improving each competition and looking forward to the second half of the season where we can start tapping into our best skating.”

GRAND PRIX FINAL: Results | Broadcast Schedule

Miura and Kihara, who partnered in June 2019 and train in Ontario, both waited with trepidation for their final score to be posted, worried that each’s separate mistake on jumps might cost them the title. When they learned they won, both burst into tears.

“This was the first time in eight years that I made a mistake with a Salchow, so I thought we might not get a good score, and it would be my fault,” Kihara said.

Miura and Kihara entered the competition ranked No. 1 in the world by best scores this season ahead of Knierim and Frazier, who in March became the first U.S. pair to win a world title since 1979.

Last season, Miura and Kihara became the second Japanese pair to make a Grand Prix podium and to earn a world championships medal. Their ascension helped Japan win its first Olympic figure skating team event medal in February (a bronze that could be upgraded to gold pending the Kamila Valiyeva case).

In Grand Prix Final history, Japan had won 11 gold medals and 40 total medals, all in singles, before this breakthrough.

Knierim and Frazier, already the first U.S. pair to compete in the Grand Prix Final since 2015, became the first U.S. pair to win a Grand Prix Final medal. The Final has been held annually since 1996, though it was canceled the last two seasons due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Miura and Kihara and Knierim and Frazier ascended to the top of the sport while the top five teams from the Olympics from Russia and China have not competed internationally since the Winter Games.

All Russian skaters are ineligible for international competition due to the war in Ukraine. China’s pairs, including Olympic champions Sui Wenjing and Han Cong, didn’t enter last March’s worlds and did not compete in the fall Grand Prix Series.

Later Friday, world champion Kaori Sakamoto of Japan led the women’s short program with 75.86 points, 1.28 ahead of countrywoman Mai Mihara. American Isabeau Levito, the 15-year-old world junior champion, was fifth of six skaters in her Grand Prix Final debut.

Canadians Piper Gilles and Paul Poirier topped the rhythm dance with 85.93 points, edging Americans Madison Chock and Evan Bates by .44. Both couples are bidding for the biggest international title of their careers. None of the Olympic medalists competed internationally this fall.

The Grand Prix Final ends Saturday with the men’s and women’s free skates and free dance, all live on Peacock.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

A Winter Olympic medal still being decided, 10 months later

Fanny Smith, Daniela Maier
It's still unknown whether Fanny Smith (green) or Daniela Maier (blue) is the Olympic ski cross bronze medalist. (Getty)
0 Comments

There is a second Winter Olympic medal result still in question, 10 months after the Games.

While the figure skating team event results are still unknown due to the Kamila Valiyeva case, the bronze medal in women’s ski cross is also in dispute.

Originally, Swiss Fanny Smith crossed the finish line in third place in the four-woman final at the Winter Games in February. Upon review by the International Ski Federation (FIS) jury, she was minutes later demoted to fourth place after making contact with German Daniela Maier near the end of the course. Maier, who originally was fourth, was upgraded to bronze.

“I tried to be OK with the fourth place. I was very disappointed, I have to say, [then] the jury was like this,” Maier said then. “I am really sorry for Fanny that it’s like this right now. … The jury decided like this, so accept it and be happy with the medal.”

Smith and the Swiss ski federation appealed. FIS reinstated Smith as the bronze medalist nine days after the race and six days after the Closing Ceremony. A FIS appeals commission met four times and reviewed video and written documentation for several hours before deciding that “the close proximity of the racers at that moment resulted in action that was neither intentional or avoidable.”

But that wasn’t the end. The case ended up reportedly going to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), whose rulings are usually accepted as final. The CAS process is ongoing, European media reported this week.

CAS has not responded to a request for comment. A FIS contact said Friday, “There is currently no update to provide in regards to the bronze medal in ski cross. Should there be any update, we will inform you.”

Smith said there should be news soon regarding the case, according to Blick.

Maier still has the bronze medal at her home and enjoys looking at it, according to German media, which also reported that the German ski federation expects Maier to win the case and keep the medal. Smith and Maier spoke extensively about it in recent training sessions and cleared things up. Maier said the best outcome would be bronze medals for both of them, according to the report.

For now, FIS lists Smith as the bronze medalist. The IOC lists Maier as the bronze medalist.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!