Video: Could Mo Farah, Usain Bolt race each other?

Mo Farah, Usain Bolt
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c6hwrLNT65Q

Usain Bolt responded to Mo Farah‘s challenge to a race. The verdict?

“That sounds fun,” Bolt said. “It’s going to be hard, but for me it’s charity, so it’s just all about fun and enjoyment,”

Farah, the Olympic champion in the 5,000 meters and 10,000 meters, plead with Bolt, the 2008 and 2012 Olympic champion in the 100 and 200, for a meeting of the two biggest track stars in the world.

“It’d be great to be able to do a distance where people vote in what distance will be suitable, and then get a judge and then come in the middle with that distance and train for it,” Farah told Sky Sports.

“Are you up for that?” Farah said, looking into the camera. “Come on, you’ve got to do it.”

Bolt was shown the video and chuckled.

“I’m up for anything,” he said. “Anything’s possible.”

Asked about the distance, Bolt shuddered at running anything close to Farah’s specialties. Not even the 1,500.

“It’s way too far,” he said. “600 for sure I can try because I’ve done 600 meters in training but not 1,500 meters.”

Olympic 800-meter champion David Rudisha has entertained the nation of facing Bolt over 400 or 600 meters — perhaps even on a 4×400 relay. But Rudisha’s knee injury that will keep him out the rest of the year put those plans on hold.

Bolt came up through the junior ranks as a 400-meter runner but has sparingly run the one-lap event in the last few years.

Farah, who is getting into marathon racing, actually recently went down to the 1,500 and broke the British record. He wanted to add the 1,500 to his schedule at the world championships in Moscow next month, but the 1,500 semifinals and the 5,000 final are on the same night. That’s too much even for the great Farah.

So, 600 meters seems like a fair meeting point.

Perhaps the most famous meeting of track champions came in 1997, when Atlanta Olympic champions Donovan Bailey (100) and Michael Johnson (200 and 400) met to determine the world’s fastest man for a $1 million prize.

That showdown had quite the anticlimactic finish.

Video: Inside Usain Bolt’s training session

2023 French Open women’s singles draw, scores

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At the French Open, Iga Swiatek of Poland eyes a third title at Roland Garros and a fourth Grand Slam singles crown overall.

The tournament airs live on NBC Sports, Peacock and Tennis Channel through championship points in Paris.

Swiatek, the No. 1 seed from Poland, can join Serena Williams and Justine Henin as the lone women to win three or more French Opens since 2000.

Having turned 22 on Wednesday, she can become the youngest woman to win three French Opens since Monica Seles in 1992 and the youngest woman to win four Slams overall since Williams in 2002.

FRENCH OPEN: Broadcast Schedule | Men’s Draw

But Swiatek is not as dominant as in 2022, when she went 16-0 in the spring clay season during an overall 37-match win streak.

She retired from her last pre-French Open match with a right thigh injury and said it wasn’t serious. Before that, she lost the final of another clay-court tournament to Australian Open champion Aryna Sabalenka of Belarus.

Sabalenka, the No. 2 seed, and Elena Rybakina of Kazakhstan, the No. 4 seed and Wimbledon champion, are the top challengers in Paris.

No. 3 Jessica Pegula, the highest-seeded American man or woman, was eliminated in the third round.

No. 6 Coco Gauff, runner-up to Swiatek last year, is the best hope to become the first American to win a Grand Slam singles title since Sofia Kenin at the 2020 Australian Open. The 11-major drought is the longest for U.S. women since Seles won the 1996 Australian Open.

MORE: All you need to know for 2023 French Open

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2023 French Open Women’s Singles Draw

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2023 French Open men’s singles draw, scores

French Open Men's Draw
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The French Open men’s singles draw is missing injured 14-time champion Rafael Nadal for the first time since 2004, leaving the Coupe des Mousquetaires ripe for the taking.

The tournament airs live on NBC Sports, Peacock and Tennis Channel through championship points in Paris.

Novak Djokovic is not only bidding for a third crown at Roland Garros, but also to lift a 23rd Grand Slam singles trophy to break his tie with Nadal for the most in men’s history.

FRENCH OPEN: Broadcast Schedule | Women’s Draw

But the No. 1 seed is Spaniard Carlos Alcaraz, who won last year’s U.S. Open to become, at 19, the youngest man to win a major since Nadal’s first French Open title in 2005.

Now Alcaraz looks to become the second-youngest man to win at Roland Garros since 1989, after Nadal of course.

Alcaraz missed the Australian Open in January due to a right leg injury, but since went 30-3 with four titles. Notably, he has not faced Djokovic this year. They could meet in the semifinals.

Russian Daniil Medvedev, the No. 2 seed, was upset in the first round by 172nd-ranked Brazilian qualifier Thiago Seyboth Wild. It marked the first time a men’s top-two seed lost in the first round of any major since 2003 Wimbledon (Ivo Karlovic d. Lleyton Hewitt).

No. 9 Taylor Fritz and No. 12 Frances Tiafoe are the highest-seeded Americans, looking to become the first U.S. man to make the French Open quarterfinals since Andre Agassi in 2003. Since then, five different American men combined to make the fourth round on eight occasions.

MORE: All you need to know for 2023 French Open

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2023 French Open Men’s Singles Draw

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